Lie to Recruiters About the Salary at my Current Job?

F500Guy's picture
Rank: Monkey | 64

I currently work as a mid-level corporate finance manager at a F500 and make $93k with no bonus. I know that I am vastly underpaid and the average pay for someone with my education/experience is about $130k with a 20% bonus, so I'm interested in making a move to another company.

The problem I have is that every time I talk to a recruiter, one of their first questions is "How much do you currently make?" As soon as I tell them I only make $93k with no bonus, they immediately set the bar at that level and say that they can get me $95k to $100k with a 10-15% bonus even though I'm qualified to make $130-$135k with a 20% bonus. I'm worried that lying about my current salary might get me in trouble, but I'm at a loss for what to do and I don't want to take a job that pays 30-40% less than what I'm worth. Any ideas?

Should I Lie About My Current Salary When Negotiating?

Generally, our users agree that if you are being vastly underpaid at your previous / current job you can reasonably increase the amount that you claim to be making.

OpsDude:

I know plenty of people that lied about their salary, and none of them got caught. The fact of the matter is, most big companies base their salary offer on your previous salary - offering 12-15% bumps generally. I'd say lying is worth the risk if you are severely underpaid, because every company you interview for is going to low-ball you if they know your real salary.

Hemingsway:

I would lie. My coworker did it and the recruiter didn't say anything. The worst thing that could happen is they call you out on it and you don't get the job because you lied or because the salary is too low. No loss.

antmavel - Corporate Finance Manager:

State the salary you would like to consider being hired out, otherwise it doesn't make any sense. Who cares if they check your previous salary, it doesn't matter. Each time you move to a new firm you have a one-off opportunity to make a big financial leap forward, otherwise it's all about small increase on a yearly basis and your bonus...

User @i hate audit shared a different opinion:

i hate audit:

If you are working with an external recruiting firm, go ahead and lie about your salary -- if/when you get caught, just blame it on the recruiter and say they inflated your salary. If you are working with an internal recruiter, definitely don't lie.

However, several users shared that they were asked for their W2 and old paystubs during the hiring process. However, @OpsDude shared the following thoughts on this concern:

OpsDude:

They legally cannot ask your old company your pay. I've seen W2 asked for, but you can just say you got a raise at year end and had a bunch of deductions, and they have no way of verifying. My friend added $10k to her salary, got asked for a W2 during background check, and then nothing happened.

Want to Learn More About Salary Negotiation?

Read the article - How to Negotiate For More Money During the Interview Process to learn more about the salary negotiation process.

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Comments (102)

Jun 6, 2014

I've always thought of answering the question the same way as you would answer the salary requirement one. I tell them what I felt I was worth in respect to the position and negotiations stem from there.

Jun 6, 2014

I actually tried that with the last recruiter I talked to, and she repeatedly said "I need to know what your current salary is." Should I flat out say I don't want to share that information and I'd rather focus on my market value and the salary range offered for the positions?

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Best Response
Jun 6, 2014

I know plenty of people that lied about their salary, and none of them got caught. The fact of the matter is, most big companies base their salary offer on your previous salary - offering 12-15% bumps generally. I'd say lying is worth the risk if you are severely underpaid, because every company you interview for is going to low-ball you if they know your real salary.

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Jun 6, 2014
OpsDude:

I know plenty of people that lied about their salary, and none of them got caught. The fact of the matter is, most big companies base their salary offer on your previous salary - offering 12-15% bumps generally. I'd say lying is worth the risk if you are severely underpaid, because every company you interview for is going to low-ball you if they know your real salary.

Thank you man. This is how I feel and what I wanted to do but I think I just needed to hear someone else say it.

Jun 6, 2014

I would lie. My coworker did it and the recruiter didn't say anything. The worst thing that could happen is they call you out on it and you don't get the job because you lied or because the salary is too low. No loss.

Jun 6, 2014
Hemingway:

I would lie. My coworker did it and the recruiter didn't say anything. The worst thing that could happen is they call you out on it and you don't get the job because you lied or because the salary is too low. No loss.

Agreed - I guess the only way it could go wrong is if I got an offer from a new company, put in my 2 weeks with my current company, then HR at the new company asked for a copy of my W2 or pay stub from my old company. At that point I think I'd be screwed, but I don't think HR would ask for that or call my old company to verify my pay, right?

Jun 6, 2014
F500Guy:
Hemingway:

I would lie. My coworker did it and the recruiter didn't say anything. The worst thing that could happen is they call you out on it and you don't get the job because you lied or because the salary is too low. No loss.

Agreed - I guess the only way it could go wrong is if I got an offer from a new company, put in my 2 weeks with my current company, then HR at the new company asked for a copy of my W2 or pay stub from my old company. At that point I think I'd be screwed, but I don't think HR would ask for that or call my old company to verify my pay, right?

They legally cannot ask your old company your pay. I've seen W2 asked for, but you can just say you got a raise at year end and had a bunch of deductions, and they have no way of verifying. My friend added $10k to her salary, got asked for a W2 during background check, and then nothing happened.

Jun 6, 2014

I really, really want to be a boy scout and say don't lie. I'm sure it's wrong. But I got pegged at a lower salary and when switching jobs, that lower salary is the benchmark of future salaries, and kind of hangs on you like an albatross. Especially out in F500 land with 3% annual raises and whatnot. Takes a looong time to overcome.

If you don't get caught, my hat's off to you.

Jun 6, 2014

Don't lie..just inflate your salary a bit. I've never had a recruiter ask to verify my salary, although a friend told me one asked for his W2.

Jun 6, 2014

Lie, but don't price yourself out of anything.

Remember, the recruiter doesn't work for you, he/she works for and gets paid by the firm that ends up hiring you.

Jun 6, 2014

Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the recruiter take a percentage of the offer salary? So they still have an incentive to get you as much money as possible, right?

Jun 6, 2014
Window View:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the recruiter take a percentage of the offer salary? So they still have an incentive to get you as much money as possible, right?

The long-term incentive is to keep the client happy, not worth risking the relationship for a few extra dollars on one individual employee.

Jun 9, 2014

hmm so when recruiters hear your salary # do they then in their mind inflate it by ~10-15% because they know you're likely bluffing?

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

Jun 9, 2014

Recruiters work for the employer so it is in their best interest to make the employer as happy as possible. If you think about it from the recruiter's perspective, the employer will love them if they call the company up and say "hey I have this stand out candidate with great experience and I can get him for you for 30% less than the market rate." Definitely helps that recruiter get repeat business with the client.

Before lying about what I make (id like to avoid it if possible), I may take dingdongs advice and avoid the question altogether and just tell them my target salary range. If they persist, I may just say I'm not comfortable telling them my pay because it isn't relevant. Should be interesting to see how that goes..

Jun 14, 2014

but isn't that a rather short term POV ... if you hire good people at cheaply they will figure it out and leave in a year or 2 to get what they deserve.

Jun 9, 2014

a close friend of mine was in this very situation, was extremely underpaid, like ridiculously so for the hours/work involved. just changed jobs and in the interview process said she hoped for a salary close to the low end of what she saw on glassdoor. the company didn't respond (mind you, she said she made more than she did and asked for more still); later on when she followed up, gave them a counteroffer a bit below what she'd initially quoted and found out that salary was the only thing holding the company up (not F500, a small firm), but I guess the takeaway is she aimed high, was comfortable sending a counteroffer, and nothing bad happened, she's happily employed and is making a fair wage. if it were me, I'd lie if severely underpaid, because I told the truth once when switching firms and I found out I made about 15% less than my contemporaries (if this doesn't piss you off, you don't have a pulse). you will get pegged at that salary; what's more, no BB will ask for your W2 unless you have a nutcase hiring manager, at least mine doesn't.

Jun 9, 2014

I may be coming at this from a different angle because I'm probably more senior than a lot of other people on this site but when headhunters have called me to talk about a position that I've shown interest in talking about and ask me my current comp structure, I tell them how much I'd need to make to leave.

I think it's BS when recruiters make you negotiate against yourself by asking you to throw out the first number. An employers, especially a F500 or really any decently sized company, already has a salary and overall comp in mind.

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Jun 9, 2014

I'd rather throw out the first number in a salary negotiation. There is tons of research to support the benefits of setting an anchor above your target.

Jun 9, 2014

SirTradesalot wrote an article that essentially supports what you and Dingdong08 say. If you throw out the first number, tell them what salary you need to leave and anchor at a point you'd be happy with.

Jun 10, 2014

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

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Jun 9, 2014

Just say you're making market rate and request the range for the opportunity.

Giving out your rate is putting a ceiling on your package so don't. HR is BSing when they say your current rate is required.

Jun 11, 2014

If they ask for a pay stub you are fucked!

Jun 11, 2014

try avoiding lies and letting them know your target range before that.

Jun 11, 2014

Here's what you do, don't give them a number. Say industry competitive or give them a range. They do get paid a commish based off the package they get you. However, their concern is placing as many people as possible.

Or even better say, "I'm looking for 150 minimum all in. If you can make that happen, great. Otherwise this is non-negotiable"

Jun 11, 2014

If they continue to press on your current wage, I will only offer them the bucket I fall into. More times than not, I give them a $20k-$25k range with my current wage at the low end of that range. It essentially forces them to offer above that range to hold my interest.

Jun 11, 2014

My cousin who is an engineer is starting in oil for this very reason, wants to start his career at a high base salary before moving to other industries.

Jun 11, 2014

I was in this very position recently - I moved from a boutique fund (where base salaries were comparatively low reflecting our cost of capital) to a much larger bank. I was asked directly by the recruiter when initially approached and I told him the truth re my current salary, making sure to stress that I was aware my base salary was below market and would expect much higher when moving to a new role. When discussing salary expectations with HR following my final interview, I was careful to avoid committing to a specific number. Instead, I again stressed that I knew my current base was below market, and I would expect to be paid inline with my experience, expertise and the industry. In the end, I was made an offer above what I'd wanted.

In short, I would err on the side of transparency - with both recruiter and HR alike. If you draw attention to the fact that you are aware you are underpaid and trust their judgement with regards your expected value to the firm, hopefully you won't be disappointed.

Jun 11, 2014

EnergyTraderLDN, I'm glad things worked out for you, but if you expect banks to look out for your best interest you're absolutely crazy. I know so many people who have gotten f'ed over for so many different reasons.

Jun 11, 2014

I work at a F500 and they definitely asked for my 2 most recent paystubs during the hiring process. I assume this was to verify current employment as well as stated salary. I didn't feel like this was an uncommon request.

Jun 11, 2014

if you are working with an external recruiting firm, go ahead and lie about your salary -- if/when you get caught, just blame it on the recruiter and say they inflated your salary. never tried this myself but a friend recommended this strategy to me when i was looking for my most recent job. if you are working with an internal recruiter, def dont lie. i do like the idea of saying how much it will take you to leave your current job.

currently at a F500 and they asked for the 2 most recent pay stubs + W2 forms.

Jun 11, 2014

State the salary you would like to consider being hired out, otherwise it doesn't make any sense. Who cares if they check your previous salary, it doesn't matter...if you are good do you really think they will be back 6 months later to ask you to accept a lower salary, I really don't think so....each time you move to a new firm you have a one-off opportunity to make a big financial leap forward, otherwise it's all about small increase on a yearly basis and your bonus...

Jun 11, 2014

There is an irony somewhere here when one of the first interactions with a future employer is a position where are incentivized to lie about your salary to help negotiations along.

Jun 11, 2014

Headhunters want to know your salary because they don't want to waste their time and yours. They get paid if you get hired and accept the position. Tell the HH what you need to make to leave your job. That's that. Also tell the HH that they are not allowed to release your salary information since it will fuck you in negotiations.

Jun 11, 2014

I own a recruiting firm focused on energy trading and I would not outright lie but you can stress you are looking for "market" to "above market" comp. If its a focused firm they will have a very good idea of your current comp so no need to lie. If its a big recruiting firm and you are talking to a 24 year old then use your best judgement. I stress all in with clients and most know that if firm A offers a lower base but more upside they may need to offer more upfront if smaller bonus pool.

On roles that are more sales focusued like brokers - I have had clients request W2

Jun 11, 2014

If it's a position I'm lukewarm about or if I'm just trying to get paid more in the same role, I always inflate my salary 10% or so when talking to recruiters. If you're making $93k, just round up to $100k or $105-110k and juice the bonus percentage a little.

However, the fact you said "I am vastly underpaid and the average pay for someone with my education/experience is about $130k with a 20% bonus" caught my attention. What are you basing this target on? and have you asked yourself (honestly) why are you are not being paid close to that level? If you think you're worth $130k + 20%, just tell recruiters that's your number. If this immediately rules you out, then that's not in fact market for someone with your education/experience. My guess is that you/a contact of yours in the industry is inflating the expectation as well.

Jun 11, 2014

@milehigh - I've had multiple emails from recruiters for roles that have around a 130k base and 20% bonus, and the job responsibilities were virtually identical to my current responsibilities.

I'm underpaid because I started with my current company at the lower end of the salary range because I was actually honest with them about what I was making at my last company, so they gave me a slight bump off of that amount. Also, I finished my MBA and a couple certifications since I started with this company but they unfortunately don't give raises or additional comp to recognize that. Unfortunately, in F500 land (at least at my company), you get your 3% annual increase and 10% for promotions and they could care less if you're paid less than what you're worth. Actually, they prefer it that way.

Jun 11, 2014

Got it. In that case, I would confidently tell the recruiters you're looking for ~$130k + 20% based on other positions you've seen in the space and your education and experience level, then see how they react. When they ask what you're making, I'd just tell them "all in I make $X" (base + bonus) regardless of whether you got a bonus or not. Just make sure whatever numbers you use add up in case they ask you to separate base and bonus.

For your "all in" number, you want to show them that you're being compensated to a point that you're clearly "good enough" for the new role, but not so high that they think you're unlikely to make a move at the $130,000 amount. I think if you say all-in around $110-115k then they should put you towards the $130,000 positions.

Best of luck.

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Jun 15, 2014
F500Guy:

@milehigh - I've had multiple emails from recruiters for roles that have around a 130k base and 20% bonus, and the job responsibilities were virtually identical to my current responsibilities.

I'm underpaid because I started with my current company at the lower end of the salary range because I was actually honest with them about what I was making at my last company, so they gave me a slight bump off of that amount. Also, I finished my MBA and a couple certifications since I started with this company but they unfortunately don't give raises or additional comp to recognize that. Unfortunately, in F500 land (at least at my company), you get your 3% annual increase and 10% for promotions and they could care less if you're paid less than what you're worth. Actually, they prefer it that way.

I could swear we work for the same company off this description alone lol. I guess welcome to large corp america? I'm struggling with this at my current job and it makes me want to leave even though I like my office and the people I work with.

Jun 11, 2014

Definitely lie. Don't under sell yourself.

I'm bi-winning. I win here, and I win there.

Jun 13, 2014

Does anyone else have experience with companies asking for pay stubs from your previous job? If this is the case, lying about what I currently make could be a bad move.

I've also read that salary information is private and confidential and you are not obligated to share it with anyone, even a prospective employer. That said, I'm sure it still wouldn't go over well if a new employer asked for pay stubs and I flat out said no.

Jun 13, 2014

Lying is really, really bad. Nobody does it. You shouldn't either. They always check, always. I am never sarcastic.

Jun 15, 2014

Having a salary-non-disclosure clause in my employment contract, above discussion surpriseses me. I have the impression that you guys either
a) are allowed to state your salary to a third person (recruiters / potential new employer) or
b) don't care that you're not allowed to.
Which of the two is it?

I'm in Europe. Is salary disclosure less of an issue in the States?

Jun 15, 2014
Monkey in Acquisitions:

Having a salary-non-disclosure clause in my employment contract, above discussion surpriseses me. I have the impression that you guys either

a) are allowed to state your salary to a third person (recruiters / potential new employer) or

b) don't care that you're not allowed to.

Which of the two is it?

I'm in Europe. Is salary disclosure less of an issue in the States?

I've never heard of that in the states.

Jun 15, 2014
Monkey in Acquisitions:

Having a salary-non-disclosure clause in my employment contract, above discussion surpriseses me. I have the impression that you guys either

a) are allowed to state your salary to a third person (recruiters / potential new employer) or

b) don't care that you're not allowed to.

Which of the two is it?

I'm in Europe. Is salary disclosure less of an issue in the States?

I don't think my company has a non disclosure around pay, but I think this could be a good way of avoiding the question when a recruiter asks for salary information. I could say something along the lines of "I signed a non disclosure agreement with my company so my current pay information is confidential, but my target salary for my job search is is $X."

Jun 15, 2014

Interesting that you all have this experience. My company seems to work very hard to compensate people appropriately to avoid turnover. However, I have only been with them a year so we'll see if I am happy with my comp 4 years down the road.

FYI 93k for a finance manager with more than 5 years total finance experience is BS even in my low-cost state. Your all in comp should be at least $125k and $140k+ is not crazy.

Jun 16, 2014

Plenty of bad advices here, actually. Sorry guys.

The best strategy is to say that you have a non-disclosure and to tell a recruiter how much you want to earn. If you have 93k and would like to have 130k you can say: I want 130k slightly negotiable (you can add 'which is smth like 10% or a bit above than my current salary'). This is NOT THE SAME as 'I have 115k and want to earn 130k'.

And this is because:

* recruiter (especially from agency) is most probably aware of current salary levels in your company. If you lie there is a big chance he\she will know it. And that's a minus to your reputation on the market

* after you are hired HR could check your pay stub. Of course, yog will be hired already... but nothing is beyond recall here

BR,
Mark

Jun 16, 2014

hi mark_br... I dont quite follow your comment...
Can the HR still demand the pay stub even after you have mentioned the NDA?
If they can, how is adding 'which is smth like 10% or a bit above than my current salary' not inviting unnecessary trouble?

Jun 17, 2014

Hi MBA_Junkie, actually I meant that pay stub could be demanded AFTER you were hired.

While still in the process if you say you have NDA, recruiter, of course, cannot ask you for this document.

BR,
Mark

Mar 9, 2016

Hi,
Thanks for the article. Makes me feel I'm not the only one who's severely underpaid. I landed up in a job where I lied about my salary. Now they have made an offer and asking me for my last pay stub and W2. Any suggestions how I should deal with it?

Mar 10, 2016

How bad was the lie? Like "I lumped in my stock or bonus because the online application didn't have a spot for it" or blatant fairy tale? Send it, they will probably note a discrepancy if it's not in the same ballpark. If it's the former, expect to substantiate the difference if asked. If it's the latter your offer could be rescinded.

Mar 13, 2016

I guess it is quite bad.. I work for a private company so stocks are out of question. Only part I could have lied is my bonus but when company asks for W2 for last year and see the bonus not reflecting it could be obvious. I tried to not lie about my salary when I start my job search and recruiters would advise me to apply for junior roles simply because my salary is low.

I have another offer in the pipeline and I was so scared to lie that I actually low balled myself :(. They will probably not give me a decent offer. I still dont get it: why do companies want your damn W-2.

Mar 13, 2016

Go with a ball park #. Ex: Take your Q1 Gross Earnings and x 4. I'm guessing you're asking about how to account for OT in your "salary"?

Make opportunities. Not excuses.

Mar 13, 2016

Use recruiters and just tell them one of the main reasons you're looking is due to pay. You can be honest with them and remember they get paid based on your salary so they're not looking to place someone who's making $35k who should be making $75k.

As for employers I'd say the same. Be honest but wait until it comes up. Obviously they want to pay as low as possible but they have a salary in mind when they're hiring someone and employers (trust me I've hired dozens of people, if not hundreds) dont want multiple people in the same role making wildly different salaries because it always comes up when people work together and creates issues. For example, if you're hired as the 10th analyst/associate and 9 of then make between $72-$78k and they pay you $50k you will find out and be a discontent employee and want to leave. The act and cost of hiring a new you after you leave isn't worth the delta between your pay and everyone else's. And employers aren't stupid: they know someone looks for a new job to make more money.

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Mar 13, 2016

Sounds like HR is just going through the process. They are anal about dumb, mundane things. Just provide them the info so they can check their little box.

Mar 13, 2016
AnthonyD1982:

Sounds like HR is just going through the process. They are anal about dumb, mundane things. Just provide them the info so they can check their little box.

Just like Toby from The Office, yuck.

"If you can count your money, you don't have a billion dollars." - J. Paul Getty

Mar 13, 2016

Yeah, did it already. Freaking had my heart racing thinking it was the final decision. Not cool, HR. I hope my reference was right about my status.

Mar 13, 2016

everyone does it, they want to make sure that if they do make an offer, its more or within range of your previous job

Mar 13, 2016

Good question, I'd like to know too.

We're Italian, "WACC" means something else to us.

We're Italian, "WACC" means something else to us.

Mar 13, 2016

great question

Mar 13, 2016

I've been asked this too, and I figure it's good to say something along the lines of, "I'd prefer to talk about salary when there's an offer on the table". Not with any attitude: just simply that you can divulge that information once you are made an offer. Thoughts? Good idea? Bad idea?

Mar 13, 2016

they needs salary number before the interview to see how much are worth..

if u are forced to tell... always say approximate and add bonus too

Mar 13, 2016

That seems reasonable to me as well. Initially, it would appear to be a good idea to answer so they would know if they would even be in the ballpark when it came to the level of compensation they intended to offer but actually it seems to me that pay among similar level positions even at different firms are rather standard, there for making it a fairly unnecessary question.

Ultimately I would think telling the truth is the best choice, but I am curious if salary inflation is common in interviews. If so, how much?

Mar 13, 2016

Maybe this is a way for the interviewing firm to establish what tier of analyst you are !

If I was in that position I would state my actual base + whatever the top tier analyst in my year received as a bonus. this would give the interviewing firm the impression that
a) you are truthful about the base (which is fairly standard across the board) and b) that you were one of the top tier analysts in the firm you are coming from

Its simply a signaling effect!

Mar 13, 2016

Sneaky!

We're Italian, "WACC" means something else to us.

We're Italian, "WACC" means something else to us.

Mar 13, 2016

I'm completely with Alphaholic.
You should NOT:
1) tell them your salary - if you've learnt about negotiation strategies, your current salary is most like your BATNA. If the employer gets this info, you're position in the contract negotiation becomes VERY weak.
2) make up an inflated salary: HR isn't stupid. Background checks are real and they can find out if you're full of shit. While background checks will probably not result in the HR finding out exactly what you made during the last work, they can have an informed (and pretty accurate) guess by confirming the industry you were in and what kind of things you were doing before.

Remember - no employer can demand you to tell them your salary. Your salary is a private information and is definitely NOT something that will look bad on you if you choose not to reveal it. Alphaholic's approach seems to be a good way to mitigate such situation.

Mar 13, 2016

Bump

Mar 13, 2016

I think it's a good thing, unless for some reason your current comp was more than an entry-level associate position. How long until you should hear depends on WAY too many factors to accurately assess. If it was a superday you attended and haven't heard yet, you may already be screwed. If it's a more informal process with a lot of rolling interviews it may be weeks before they know if you're the best man for the job. Never be afraid to contact HR and try to get a more accurate timeline though. Hope that helps. Also, wait 24 hours before bumping.

Mar 13, 2016

they cant check it legally, if its a big company you used to work for then its already known (so dont lie) and if you were heavily bonus compensated your pay check is private information between you and the company. It's more to make sure they make a sensible offer.

Mar 13, 2016
John Daggett:

Do you think not answering salary history questions would preclude an applicant from a job?

Yes, but it would depend on the context. Please elaborate.

Mar 13, 2016

Thanks SirTradesaLot, it looks like you answered it here: http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/blog/how-to-negotia...

This seems to suggest that it best to give a number before the interviewer can. Is that the case?

Also, would it be best to give two numbers (one high and the other very high) which are both backed up by statistics?

Mar 13, 2016

I could be wrong about this, but i am pretty sure that you are not obligated to tell HR or anyone else what you currently make.

Mar 13, 2016

This discomfort you are experiencing is the result of an asymmetry of power between employer and employee- it is perfectly normal. They can ask you. While I cannot say with any competence if you legally can refuse to answer (I wager you can), I am certain that they can withdraw the offer if they think you will be...problematic. At the beginning of a relationship, you want to be as forthright and cooperative as possible- tell the truth. If they ultimately offer you a salary that is insufficient, that is another question with another answer. Here, the answer is simple- you made the right choice by answering their question. In fact, I would recommend you answer all of their questions, provided they are relevant.

To assuage your fears, here are some questions to ask yourself: "What would I have stood to gain by refusing to answer the question? Would that have forced them to give me more money or would it just piss them off?"

Your concern is understandable, but your next move is to wait. The ball is in their court. Presumably, they will make an offer with a compensation figure. Once you know that, you'll need to decide what to do next. Until, then relax- you got a job offer in a depression- that's more than many can say.

Mar 13, 2016

I agree with RLS but would add:

Do not lie about your salary when asked. The tax forms you fill out after excepting the offer will reveal how much you were making at your previous job. If you lie, they will figure it out and will have to make a determination whether to keep you on after being dishonest with them.

My recommendation is: Be compeletely honest with them in terms of your salary/bonus. Wait for them to give you an offer before determining whether or not you want to ask for more. In the case that you do want more, I would create a schedule or table that shows the rationale for the amount you are requesting and why. This can be a salary comparison of jobs similar to the one you get offered in your market versus what they have offered you. You don't necessarily need to show this to them, but its good to have as a reference. Also, stay away from the "my rent is $2,000 a month, plus I need more money for "XYZ stupid expenses." They will look at that and say, 'why is this kid so needy? Why doesn't he move into a cheaper apartment or not spend money on "XYZ?"

Once you ask them, the worst thing they can say is no. Just be sure to not come off as confrontational and you'll be fine.

Mar 13, 2016

English?

Mar 13, 2016

what is a revou salary and why dont i get one?

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

Mar 13, 2016

Just forge one, that's easy enough.

Mar 13, 2016

Dumb, just dumb.

Mar 13, 2016

You're probably screwed, but your only option is to probably tell them you're not comfortable giving them your pay stub.

Yeah, you're probably screwed.

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

Mar 13, 2016
jackman:

Hi, I need some advise. I have just got a job offer from a consltanting firm. However at the interview I overstated my previous salary . Now the new consultating firm want me to provide them with my final pay slip.. how should i play this one. any ideas?

Just tell them that while looking up the pay stub in your records, you realized you made an honest mistake. Hopefully you didn't overstate your salary too drastically or else it will really look like you were trying to take them for a ride.

Mar 13, 2016
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Mar 13, 2016
Mar 13, 2016
Mar 13, 2016
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The Auto Show

Mar 13, 2016