What are you reading? - What newspapers, magazines, journals, books do you recommend?

One of the most common suggestions on this site during a job search is to continue to educate yourself. Everyone seeking to advance is engouraged to read. I want to know what people are reading on a daily, weekly, monthly basis. What newspapers, magazines, journals, books do you recommend?

Comments (270)

Jun 11, 2012

Got like 30 pgs left in "currency wars" and im like 40 into "how to win friends and influence ppl". as far as staying current, im all on-line and tv. I despise newspapers because I dont know how to fold them properly and shit. I always feel like I'm reading a map with them

GBS

Jun 11, 2012
GoldmanBallSachs:

Got like 30 pgs left in "currency wars" and im like 40 into "how to win friends and influence ppl". as far as staying current, im all on-line and tv. I despise newspapers because I dont know how to fold them properly and shit. I always feel like I'm reading a map with them

I shared your sentiment, then taught myself to do it. The 5 minute investment is one worth making.

I find that few things beat reading the WSJ at the beginning of the day (before 8AM, latest). After that, information sources on the job tend to keep you up to date (Bloomberg, Reuters). For intra-day updates, industry-specific websites do the job well (Seeking Alpha, DealBook, etc.).

Jun 11, 2012

I have "How to Win Friends" in my Amazon cart!

Others I have going on right now:
Aldous Huxley - "Island"
Uri - "Getting to Yes"
"Money-Driven Medicine"
"Healthcare USA"
Graham & Dodd - "Security Analysis"

I steal my neighbor's copy of the WSJ (it's okay he never reads it), but usually check online at Bloomberg, FT, Kaiser Health News, Dealbook, and Al Jazeera.

Hoping to start trading medical stocks/purchasing hospital bonds soon. Which, combined with being an analyst in CO, justifies my selections.

GBS - How do you like Currency Wars?

Jun 11, 2012

^good shit, learn a lot about the macro scene

GBS

Jun 11, 2012

50 Shades of Gray

Jun 11, 2012
Buddyfox:

50 Shades of Gray

lol, i see all these old women reading this book on my commute to work.

Jun 11, 2012
manbearpig:
Buddyfox:

50 Shades of Gray

lol, i see all these old women reading this book on my commute to work.

I've heard so many girls talking about this book. So much so that my friend started talking to me about it...Beware, it's messed up.

But I've been reading Hull's Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives.

Jun 11, 2012

Options Made Easy and The Way of the Turtle

Here to learn and hopefully pass on some knowledge as well. SB if I helped.

Jun 11, 2012

Here is what I have been reading this summer, it is mainly value investing focused:

Trade Like Warren Buffet - Altucher
The Bond King - Timothy Meddleton
The Panic of 1907 - Carr & Bruner
The Essays of Warren Buffet
The Alchemy of Finance - Soros
Security Analysis (already been mentioned, but specifically chapters 8 and 11)
Margin of Safety - Seth Klarman
Contrarian Value Investing Approaches - Dremen
Principles - Ray Dalio
The Intelligent Investor - Graham
Julian Robertson: A tiger in the land of the bulls and the bears - Strachman
Reminiscences of a stock operator - LeFevre

Jun 11, 2012
anon56:

Margin of Safety - Seth Klarman

Heard this is a must read for value investing, and came across the following pdf version (if you guys haven't heard of it, this book is out of print and routinely sells for around $1000 used): http://www.my10000dollars.com/MS.pdf
I'd normally feel bad posting the link, but it's out of print and I'm sure the author is doing just fine for himself. Mods of course delete if this violates the terms and conditions of WSO.

Jun 11, 2012

Not really reading books, but skimming to a plethora of mostly daily news pages such as FT, Bloomberg, WSJ, Dealbreaker, Dealbook, ZeroHedge, Barron's, Wilmott, Economist, random crap friends post on facebook, and whatever email alerts I get on academic research concerning the areas of my interest. And of course sports stuff - I mean, 'cmon, you have to.

Jun 11, 2012

Daily I normally skim as many research reports as I can pull, any new SEC Filings for companies I follow on my watchlist, random other filings and report stuff. As far as websites: Wsj, zero hedge, Financial Times, seeking alpha, bloomberg, dealbreaker... all that same stuff. I also read some selected financial blogs which I don't even know to put down because I just have them bookmarked.

Twitter actually Is where I get a lot of my news from nowadays. Hell, I even look at that more than I do the Bloomberg. Sadly, something I have also been doing is going back over some of my old text books that I kept, I have a Fabozzi one and another valuation one.

Jun 11, 2012

Yeah I think very few people purchase it. I remember seeing an interview with him and the interviewer mentioned that he read it online; he didn't seem to mind.

Jun 11, 2012

The FT and the Economist are far superior to the WSJ if you're new to finance and want to understand what's going on. The WSJ is far too right wing and overtly political. As a newbie you might have a difficult time wading through the political BS to get a sense of what's going on with markets / companies. (others might have a different opinion).

Also focus on understanding the basics of finance if you don't have that background yet. You can waste a lot of time on the melodrama of the news cycle or idolising rich investors / financiers without actually learning how to read a balance sheet/cash flow statement, or understanding what bankers actually do on a day to day basis.

Jun 11, 2012

The Alchemy of Finance - George Soros

Jun 11, 2012

Distressed debt analysis - Stephen Moyer
**Fantastic book. Not hard to read at all if you understand basic corporate finance and accounting. Halfway into this. Sort of bummed I can't finish it soon because of my SA stint.

Investment banking - Rosenbaum & Pearl
**Started this recently just by reading certain sections. Informative so far.

Jun 11, 2012

Reading:
WSJ
The God Delusion- Richard Dawkins
Shut Up, Stop Whining and Get a Life- Larry Winget
Where Ever you go, there you are- John Kabat Zinn
Loaded- Robert Sabbag

Currently in Queue
The Ice Man: The Confessions of a Mafia Contract Killer- Philip Carlo
The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test- Tom Wolfe
Smugglers Blues- Jay Brown
Mr. Nice- Howard Marks

Harvey Specter doesn't get cotton mouth.

Jun 11, 2012

Hunger Games trilogy, say what you will but they are fucking good...

Jun 11, 2012
HFFBALLfan123:

Hunger Games trilogy, say what you will but they are fucking good...

First one's good, second one's ok, third one's terrible.

Jun 12, 2012
manbearpig:
HFFBALLfan123:

Hunger Games trilogy, say what you will but they are fucking good...

First one's good, second one's ok, third one's terrible.

I didn't like the first one (more bowhunting, less feelings please) and haven't bothered with the other two. Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, now that is a trilogy. Elisabeth Salandar is badass.

Currently reading Don Quixote. Other things I've read this year: Count of Monte Cristo, The Divine Right of Capitalism, and Brave New World.

Jun 12, 2012

Great responses! Lots of books to add to my list. Thanks everyone!

Jun 13, 2012

Reading game of thrones and rewatching the first two seasons. I didn't realize how much detail I missed when I watched the first time.

Jun 16, 2012

I'm reading currency wars now and I have a few questions if someone would like to share some knowledge. I tend to be skeptical on these kind of issues so I tried doing some research on QE1&2. I gathered that there are differing opinions on "printing money" and increasing the money supply.

On one hand I hear that the fed is printing money in exchange for "assets" from banks (if anyone could clarify this id appreciate it) and injecting currency into the money supply, lowering the $'s value to boost exports.

Another side says it's just an exchange of assets. The fed has reserves (currency) and banks have tbonds or some sort of fed liability. Since cash is technically a more liquid form of a govt liability it is just an exchange of liquidity. This process i would imagine wouldn't affect the dollars value but decrease long term interest rates.

If anyone wants to explain QE and rip apart my apparent analysis it would be great. I would hate to walk around not knowing what I'm talking about.

Jun 16, 2012

A guy called "Soros" asking about monetary policy & QE... Classic!

All joking aside, my understanding is that the Fed pays for the securities / assets that it buys from the banks by crediting the reserve accounts that they have with the Fed. So its all digital, not physically printing money, but it does increase the "Monetary base". I think it increases M0 & MB, but I'm not entirely sure if it's both or just M0.

I'm not an economist though. Just a real estate investor.

Jun 16, 2012

Just read the wsj and know what is moving the markets. Credit markets specifically.

Jun 16, 2012

FT.

Jun 16, 2012

The WSJ is largely worthless; read the lex column of the FT, and the economist, and dealbreaker on NYT.

"...all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

  • Schopenhauer
Jun 16, 2012

FT > WSJ if you can deal with that gayish color they print on. Also like the Economist and I've also recently been won over by the American Interest which seems to be similar quality to the Economist.

My best piece of advice would be this: If you have enough time, try to understand what is actually going on, not just the limited amount of info they give in the article. If you don't understand something, google it. If that leads you to more things you don't understand, google those too. Obviously, you have other things going on in your life, but the best way to impress people in interviews is to simply know a lot and be fluent, and there's no substitute for putting the time in.

Jun 16, 2012
Ravenous:

FT > WSJ if you can deal with that gayish color they print on.

Agree that its a better paper, but the wsj is usually easier to get a hold of as a student.

Ravenous:

My best piece of advice would be this: If you have enough time, try to understand what is actually going on, not just the limited amount of info they give in the article. If you don't understand something, google it. If that leads you to more things you don't understand, google those too. Obviously, you have other things going on in your life, but the best way to impress people in interviews is to simply know a lot and be fluent, and there's no substitute for putting the time in.

^^Very good advice here. I'd say that is why i got my job.

Jun 16, 2012

Agreed with Ravenous on The Economist as an excellent source for current events. You won't necessarily get flashy titles or bizarre stories, but you'll get articles that are definitely thought provoking and worth reading. Interestingly enough, its mission statement is "to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress." LOL.

It's a shame the authors hide their identities, since they all seem like very bright individuals.

Bottom-line: get a subscription of The Economist.

Seabird -- why is the WSJ largely worthless? I'm genuinely curious why you hold that opinion.

"Rage, rage against the dying of the light." - DT

Jun 16, 2012

Aragorn - it has less business news than it does political content. Its full of stories. The "personal journal," "weekend journal," "review," whatever sections appeal to more of an aspiration to compete with the NYT rather than as being a business paper. And it feels to me like the quality of the reporting has gone down and gotten less thorough.

"...all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

  • Schopenhauer
Jun 16, 2012
seabird:

Aragorn - it has less business news than it does political content. Its full of stories. The "personal journal," "weekend journal," "review," whatever sections appeal to more of an aspiration to compete with the NYT rather than as being a business paper. And it feels to me like the quality of the reporting has gone down and gotten less thorough.

Fully agreed. When it was owned by the Bancroft family, it had no shareholders to report to. Now that it's owned by Rupert, the only thing I do with my free WSJ is to take the Money and Investing section out and dump the rest. No I do not care what credit card deals are available and no stop explaining what EPS is in every single article.

Another part of WSJ's incompetency is if you go to wsj.com, as of 10:33PM, the headline for markets section is "Dow Loses 200 Points - Stocks fell sharply, punctuating a three-session skid with the biggest declines this year."

yea sure. Lately, i am not even sure if I am reading WSJ or the Post.

Jun 16, 2012

Wait, what's wrong with the Markets headline?, total noob if you can't tell...

Jun 16, 2012
helpmepleasethx:

Wait, what's wrong with the Markets headline?, total noob if you can't tell...

Dow dropped 200 points on Tuesday, and it was still the headline on Thursday.

Jun 16, 2012
  • Economist for big picture stuff
  • WJS for day to day stuff
  • WSO for everything else :D
Jun 16, 2012

Side post: What about specifically for prospective traders?

I say fuck change, I don't chase dimes

Jun 16, 2012
AnATLieninNY:

Side post: What about specifically for prospective traders?

I love the zerohedge and cliffkule blogs for keeping up to date and thinking more comprehensively about current issues. I've used those to prep for my last few markets-based interviews and the interviewers have been impressed with my market knowledge and trade ideas.

Jun 16, 2012

Hunger games, harry potter, winnie the pooh books

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Jun 16, 2012
jgx101:

winnie the pooh books

Winnie the Pooh? That right there is some real dope shit.

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Jun 16, 2012
OKsure:

It's been my impression that consultants are usually well read.

"Free on nights and weekends. Are you my cellphone bill?"
Fortunately (or sadly depending if it's my creative side or rational side talking) I've stopped reading fiction. I have enough problems to deal with on a day to day basis that I don't need to worry about the fantasy rebellion against the Capitol or some shit like that.

Jun 16, 2012

Playboy articles.

Jun 16, 2012

WSJ, FT, The Economist, Christie's Greatest Estates & Esquire

My ADD-esque attention span wont allow for books.

Jun 16, 2012

too big to fail is real good. long and incredibly detailed, but aren't we all?

Jun 16, 2012

I usually just go to Barnes & Noble, head for the Business Profiles section and find something there. Basically read everything by Michael Lewis, everything on the financial meltdown, and most of the books on Boeing/Airbus and now I'm starting to move onto the stuff on Target/Walmart/Amazon. They're generally informative, interesting and easy reads which is exactly what I'm looking for after a long week of work.

Jun 16, 2012

Fucking everything, I'm an information junkie

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Jun 16, 2012

Current Reading list:

Lords of Strategy
The Ascent of Money
Crisis Economics
The Book of Basketball
Understanding Options

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

Jun 16, 2012

Don't care too much for fiction. I prefer to learn things. I'm not reading any books right now, but my "to read" list keeps getting longer.

In the morning I'll usually read "The Economist" or "Stratfor" over breakfast.

Jun 16, 2012

I used to like heavy-duty non-fiction, but lately all I've been reading is fiction - when I get back to the hotel after a long day, my brain just isn't interested in reading books on economics. In the last 6-8 months I've read:

  • A bunch of John Le Carre (The Tinker-Tailor trilogy, Little Drumer Girl, Our Kind of Traitor)
  • The Hunger Games (All 3 - got through them in ~2 weeks)
  • 4 of the Game of Thrones series, currently on the fifth

For magazines (always grab 1-2 at the airport on Monday morning), I like:

  • The Atlantic
  • Fortune
  • Bloomberg Markets
  • Economist (sometimes - if I want current events, easier to get on the internet than to read a week later)
Jun 16, 2012

Foreign Policy Magazine

Toronto Life

Jun 16, 2012

I prefer to read non-finance these days:

Fiction:
Hemmingway (big fan)... Moliere... Orwell... Voltaire... Whatever... I don't read Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings & Robert Jordan books... Might read the first twilight at some point to understand how it has such a strong hold on so many women regardless of their backgrounds. Also to understand why Tom Barack would write a memo about it and speak about it on so many occasions...

Non-Fiction (mostly politics/economics/philosophy/history):
Orwell... Edward Said... Chomsky... Various different authors in terms of history.

Finance:
Most of my non-fiction reading has been finance related, but I'm trying to change that. I've read too much to list here. I love Michael Lewis and Roger Lowenstein's books. I try to read each one they've published. I also like reading books by investors, like Margin of Safety by Seth Klarman. I will read Howard Marks' new book.

I much prefer reading good fiction these days over finance. I need to read more recent authors though and broaden my horizons. There is only so much free market/socialist/libertarian/value investing propaganda one can read before it gets repetitive...

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Jun 16, 2012
Relinquis:

Also to understand why Tom Barack would write a memo about it and speak about it on so many occasions...

I hadn't seen those youtube vids until now, thanks for sharing. The moderator for that discussion (Belasco, guy in the suit) was one of my professors.

Jun 16, 2012

On the road....usually fiction, just can't force myself to do more business books these days.

On the weekend, business books....about 12 in queue currently.

Daily reviews: The Economist, Fortune, Local Newspaper, Globe & Mail, Fast Company, Strategy+Business, Bain Insights, McKinsey Quarterly
- These are all in my Twitter feed on my phone, so I scan for what interests me the most during my commute, or later in the evening after work

Really - I second the information junkie comment above, it's useful to know the world - all parts of it. Think PESTEL globally.

Jun 16, 2012
  • The Consultant's Quick Start Guide: An Action Plan for Your First Year in Business
  • The Seven Cs of Consulting
  • Open Innovation, Seeing What's Next, Blue Ocean Strategy
  • Good to Great
  • Who Says Elephants Can't Dance?, Lou Gerstner
  • The Basics of Process Mapping, Robert Damelio
  • The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management, Eric Verzuh
  • Eats Shoots and Leaves
Jun 16, 2012

Books I've read in past 6 months or so (been on non-fiction kick I guess....studied literature in college in addition to econ):

River of Lost Footsteps: A personal History of Burma (currently reading....I think the writing is pretty meh overall, but the subject matter is interesting)

Burmese Days by George Orwell (Just read, fiction)

Lords of Strategy...I think the subtitle is "Secret History of Consulting". It's pretty good background on how BCG,
Bain and McKinsey rose to prominence and what distinguishes them

Stillwell: The American Experience in China by Tuchman (highly recommend this, especially if you have China or WWII interest....as someone who has lived in China the past two and half years or so, a lot of the frustrations Stillwell experienced resonate with me)

Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power (by Kaplan)--also recommend for thoughtful country-by-country breakdown from Africa to India, comparing the influences of Islam, America and China in each place and the strategic importance of each state

Miracle--forget subtitle and author's name but its basically a history of each Asian Tiger's economic rise and offers a bit of an argument about the importance of strategic economic planning by government. It's okay for background so you can impress Asian folks from Indonesia, Korea, Taiwan, Japan, China, Singapore with your knowledge, but the guy's grasp of economics seems shallow

Fiction wise, nothing beats collections of Raymond Carver or Flannery O'Connor's short stories for me.

Jun 16, 2012

WSJ on regular basis.

Books/magazines related to the industry I work in

Books on general business advice and self improvement (ex: How to win friends and influence people)

Jun 16, 2012

half way through the art of war great book.

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Jun 16, 2012

Economist, Forbes, Bloomberg
Inc, Entrepreneur, Fast Company (not as much the first two anymore; they've gotten worse)

As far as books go, strictly non-fiction. I feel like novels are wasting my time whenever I try them. I read a lot of business books, but science, history, and biographies as well. Usually one decent sized book each week.

Jun 16, 2012

Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist = Gospel

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Jun 16, 2012

Only non-fiction. I rarely read business books. I stick to history, science and economics. Currently finishing up a series of books on the roman republic / empire.

Jun 16, 2012

All of you guys who only read non-fiction should pic up some fiction ASAP.... it doesn't matter if it's Shakespeare, Hemmingway, Voltaire or those Twilight books... Focusing on non-fiction limits your mind and world view.

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Jun 16, 2012
Relinquis:

Twilight books

Get thee behind me, Satan.

Jun 16, 2012
Relinquis:

All of you guys who only read non-fiction should pic up some fiction ASAP.... it doesn't matter if it's Shakespeare, Hemmingway, Voltaire or those Twilight books... Focusing on non-fiction limits your mind and world view.

Have you read the world according to garp? a good buddy of mine wont shut the fuck up about it

Jun 16, 2012
Relinquis:

All of you guys who only read non-fiction should pic up some fiction ASAP.... it doesn't matter if it's Shakespeare, Hemmingway, Voltaire or those Twilight books... Focusing on non-fiction limits your mind and world view.

Amen!

Jun 16, 2012
Relinquis:

All of you guys who only read non-fiction should pic up some fiction ASAP.... it doesn't matter if it's Shakespeare, Hemmingway, Voltaire or those Twilight books... Focusing on non-fiction limits your mind and world view.

Agreed. Fiction can be just as intellectually satisfying, with exception of the Twilight series and Harry Potter-esque fantasy young adult novels. Books like that are a disgrace to the written word.

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Jun 16, 2012

I just had to chime in. Okay yes Twilight is a disgrace but NOT Harry Potter :( It is till this day for me the best book in children (and young adult) literature I've ever read. Judge away!

My formula for success is rise early, work late and strike oil - JP Getty

Jun 16, 2012

Relax, ladies. Its just Harry Potter. The only reason I read HP was because my GF (who eats this shit up like candy) at the time convinced me to.

Jun 16, 2012

I've read too many finance books (technical or otherwise) to list. But Market Wizards and Inside The House of Money have to be my favorite for the non-technical ones.

I've been a fiction tear lately and I just finished Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine which was a major inspiration for Catch-22 and the author of which is according to Bukowski, 'the best writer of the last 2000 years.' Pretty incredible stuff although it's awfully grim.
I've also read the first two volumes of In Search of Lost Time by Proust and they're easily my favorite novels of all time.

Jun 16, 2012

Last 4 books read:
- Steve Jobs Bio
- Those Guys Have All the Fun (ESPN history)
- Fortunes of Change (Talks about how the ultra-rich in the US have gotten steadily more liberal)
- Book of Basketball

Jun 16, 2012

I tend to read 3-4 books at a time (thank you iPad for making that possible with travel). I find it allows for me to reflect on the books (especially non fiction) rather than simply sprinting through a book. Right now reading:
- Elegant Universe
- Game of Thrones
- Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital

Jun 16, 2012

Haha - Sirius Black died because of a killing curse and he fell into some random-ass death well if I recall correctly. It wasn't that hard to get. Anyway sorry, I'm a pretty well read guy, and I have to say HP struck a chord few books have. Might make me sound like an idiot, as Hagrid might say, 'tis true y'know.

Jun 16, 2012
bbjhva:

Haha - Sirius Black died because of a killing curse and he fell into some random-ass death well

Exaclty. What the shit was that portal? I don't like how that wasn't explained.

Jun 16, 2012

I usually start my mornings with playboy

Jun 16, 2012
General Disarray:

I usually start my mornings with playboy

this is what i was going when i was a freshy.

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Jun 16, 2012
General Disarray:

I usually start my mornings with playboy

Why not Brazzers? More Bang for your buck

Jun 16, 2012

I'm a freshman as well. I usually check out The Economist or Financial Times.

Jun 16, 2012

WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

Best Response
Jun 16, 2012
BTbanker:

WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

All good points. I've sketched out my reading routine below. The morning stuff I tend to read cover to cover. I also read pretty much everything on Dealbreaker, because it's hysterical. Note: this is as a college senior, who is planning on joining an IBD group after graduation.

My morning reading (inbox arrival times EST):
-UBS Economics morning note (by 3:30 am)
-Bond Buyer daily digest (by 4:30 am)
-The Gartman Letter (by 6 am)
-American Banker daily digest (by 8 am)
-Thomson Reuters morning note (by market open)
-Deakbook morning digest (by market open)
-Dealbreaker Opening Bell (by 10 am)
-Term Sheet (noon-ish)

Throughout the day:
-WSJ (the app is fantastic)
-Dealbook (especially items by Steven Davidoff, aka the "Deal Professor")
-Dealbreaker (Matt Levine does a great job of distilling complicated ideas, & is funny as well if you get his humor)
-My portfolio (via Bloomberg's, Reuters', & my brokerage's apps)
-WSO (honestly, less so more recently)

Weekly:
-Hedge Fund Alert (mostly for the "Grapevine")
-My brokerage's macro research (can get tedious, so I skim)
-Various equity research (individual stocks, industry guides, etc.)
-A few other product- & industry-specific newsletters (ask alum/network contacts for their favorites)

Ongoing:
-Various books (recent titles include The Big Short & When Genius Failed)

Pleasure reading (this is important, by the way - don't be a finance robot!):
-Literature (a lot by Hemingway lately)
-A few blogs (relating to my university, sports interests, funny stuff, etc.)

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Jun 16, 2012

Props to these students looking to get ahead this way. I wish I was this smart when I was a freshman. Freshman year most mornings I was reading my text messages from the previous night to make sure I didn't drunk text 384752 girls.

Jun 16, 2012

.

Jun 16, 2012

FT,
WSJ,
seekingalpha,
The Economist,
WSO,
finance.google.com

Jun 16, 2012

@Sandhurst: Thanks for a great response! I know I wouldn't be able to read all of those you listed but I will try some of them out. Any other recommendations at my level?

Jun 16, 2012
ppatell:

@Sandhurst: Thanks for a great response! I know I wouldn't be able to read all of those you listed but I will try some of them out. Any other recommendations at my level?

The morning reading that I listed probably totals ~1.5 hour, which I'll read over breakfast, walking, between classes, etc., all on my phone.

That said, if you were to trim, my recommendation would be to keep the UBS note (it's succinct; max 2 min), the Gartman Letter (varies; ~15 min), American Banker (skim; ~5 min), Thomson Reuters (super worthwhile; ~10 min), Dealbook (varies; ~15 min), and Term Sheet (also great; ~10 min).

That makes for a total of approx 45 min, after which you will be informed on (in the same order) macro news, global markets, US financial industry, US equities, US i-banking, and US private equity & venture capital. Not a bad deal.

Jun 16, 2012

Hi sandhurst

May i know where you get your subscriptions to term sheet and UBS Economics morning note?

I can't seem to find them online.

Jun 16, 2012

Hi Sandhurst.

Are these free? Also, I have googled UBS Econ morning notes and Reuters morning notes and there was no result.

Snootchie Bootchies

Jun 16, 2012

Someone already mentioned seeking alpha, but they have a wall street breakfast newsletter that will email you a quick breakdown every morning around 9. It can also be humorous at times.

Jun 16, 2012
MindOverMonkey:

Someone already mentioned seeking alpha, but they have a wall street breakfast newsletter that will email you a quick breakdown every morning around 9. It can also be humorous at times.

With the current state of the financial system and the hilarity of the fiscal cliff negotiations, pretty much any financial/economic news is humorous these days...

I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

Jun 16, 2012

I should have included these in my post above:

UBS: http://www.ibb.ubs.com/institutions/securities-res......
TR: http://online.thomsonreuters.com/morningnewscall/
Term Sheet: gettermsheet.com

Jun 16, 2012

Thanks so much Sandhurst for the replies.

Did you do a paid subscription to the Gartman Letter? For American Banker, Bond Buyer, it seems i need a business email or else I can't get them up and running.

Do advise if you can.

Jun 16, 2012

I check my facebook, twitter, barstoolsports, kissingsuzykolber, profootballtalk, my fantasy team and my fanduel teams.

Jun 16, 2012

Oh and linkedin if I'm really bored out of my mind

Jun 16, 2012

WSJ, FT, and AbnormalReturns.com (a daily linkfest of the best finance/econ writing in the blogosphere) are really all you need.

Jun 16, 2012
Hayek:

WSJ, FT, and AbnormalReturns (a daily linkfest of the best finance/econ writing in the blogosphere) are really all you need.

Thanks a lot!
I'm going to stick with WSJ, Bloomberg, Seeking Alpha's Wall Street Breakfast, and FT.

I quick question in regards to WSJ: Most of the articles on WSJ need a subscription, is there anyway, besides pay for a subscription, that I can get access to the locked articles?

Thanks!

Jun 16, 2012

Only read FT, everything else is crap

Jun 16, 2012

Zerohedge

Jun 16, 2012

If you are a freshman, spend your time doing something fun and worry about finance in a few years.

Jun 16, 2012
Bobby Digital:

If you are a freshman, spend your time doing something fun and worry about finance in a few years.

...or I can do both.

Jun 16, 2012

Don't read zerohedge yet, you'll end up cynical early and have a hard time getting a job.

Jun 16, 2012
meabric:

Don't read zerohedge yet, "you'll end up cynical early" and have a hard time getting a job.

Lolll!

Jun 16, 2012
meabric:

Don't read zerohedge yet, you'll end up cynical early and have a hard time getting a job.

haha truth... may be why I am such a cynical asshole at this point in my life. that and drudge report

Jun 16, 2012

Great question OP and awesome info. Thanks Sandhurst

PE is the new black.

Jun 16, 2012
barbariansatthegates:

Great question OP and awesome info. Thanks Sandhurst

I'm actually quite surprised that this question wasn't asked previously. No problem!

Jun 16, 2012

Sandhurst - why the Bond Buyer? You plan on joining a muni group or just interested in the industry?

Jun 16, 2012
ChiTown82:

Sandhurst - why the Bond Buyer? You plan on joining a muni group or just interested in the industry?

I'm going into an industry group, but I had an internship in cap markets, so I like to stay informed. Among a few other product-specific publications, I read Bond Buyer in particular because I have become a bit of a municipal finance conspiracy theorist.. not going to get into it here, but I can discuss via pm.

Jun 16, 2012

Marketwatch.

Jun 16, 2012

Hi OP,

If you really want to learn and get more accustomed to things, then the laundry list of sites noted above are definitely good. That should help you with breadth of stuff, but honestly it would probably be more useful to you to start with something you like and let that inform your reading process.

Let me explain -- say you read an article about the fiscal cliff. Unless you know what that means or what the economic impacts people are referring to mean, then reading a series of articles is somewhat useless to you. You'd be better off reading a bit about definitions of fiscal policy and the terms that are being thrown around.

Another example would be if you like a certain type of company -- say it is an automaker. Then maybe start reading news about that sector, and use that as a bouncing pad to other stuff (like if a set of companies are mentioned as seeing the same thing).

It's easy to get information, the hard part is actually interpreting it and making sense of it in your own head. That's why it may help to start small and build your knowledge base over time.

For current events, looking at the front page of really any financial news source will be sufficient. To actually understand what you are reading will require more work, and that's probably a better choice early on -- let your curiosity guide your reading and "information overload" will be more manageable.

Jun 16, 2012

The economist, FT, WSJ, Bloomberg Briefs (if u you have access to bloomberg terminal), Forbes, Fortunes, Barrons, Businessweek is ok sometimes.

Jun 16, 2012

Thanks a lot OP and Sandhurst, subscribed to most of those newsletters yesterday and just finished reading them. Info was presented very concisely and was super informative. Thanks a million, super helpful

Jun 16, 2012

I typically browse everything from Financial Times to Yahoo Finance. Dealbook is my goto, very concise but informative articles. I've even had interview questions asking me to analyze a Dealbook article.

Jun 16, 2012

Just adding to the boat load of quality links:

Felix Salmon Blog
http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/

Der Spiegel for Euro news
http://www.spiegel.de/international/

Back when I was a student:
http://news.efinancialcareers.com/us-en/

TIME Daily Briefing for non-finance look around the world
http://world.time.com/category/daily-briefing/

Jun 16, 2012

nypost.com

Jun 16, 2012

I just realized I actually only read the WSJ, dealbreaker, and WSO. The rest of my activity is just to waste time.

Jun 16, 2012
CountryUnderdog:

I just realized I actually only read the WSJ, dealbreaker, and WSO. The rest of my activity is just to waste time.

I've fallen into this same thing. Occasionally I will mix it up and hit zerohedge or DealBook. Seeking Alpha has a decent article from time to time. Bloomberg is getting way to Bloombergish for me lately; I can't take it seriously anymore.

I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

Jun 16, 2012

reddit. jk, sort of

Jun 16, 2012

bloomberg, reuters, google news(aggregator), wsj, the economist

Jun 16, 2012

techcrunch, reddit.com/r/technology

Jun 16, 2012

Dealbook

Jun 16, 2012

One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch is worth a read.

Jun 16, 2012

Einhorn's book
Margin of Safety
The Market Wizards books
Trading Catalysts

I'd imagine anything on the Blue Ridge Capital reading list would be good reads

Jun 16, 2012
goblan:

I'd imagine anything on the Blue Ridge Capital reading list would be good reads

I agree actually, but most of these reading lists are ridiculous and can only be used for a rough guideline. You still have to go and pick the ones best suited for your needs.

Jun 16, 2012

Michael Lewis.

Jun 16, 2012

investment checklist - michael shearn
competition demystified - greenwald
value - McKinsey
valuation - McKinsey
art of short selling - staley

Jun 16, 2012

I'll second Margin of Safety by Seth Klarman.

Also people will recommend the Intelligent Investor and, while it certainly deserves respect for pioneering value investing, I think there are more modern books that articulate the principles more clearly and succinctly.

"My dear, descended from the apes! Let us hope it is not true, but if it is, let us pray that it will not become generally known."

Jun 16, 2012

Cannot recommend The Most Important Thing by Howard Marks highly enough. Great treatise on investor psychology; covers both common mistakes and positioning to avoid said mistakes. Google a PDF or torrent for maximum utility.

Jun 16, 2012
Jun 16, 2012

Douglas Kennedy

Jun 16, 2012

Black Swan ... it sucks. City Boy is a good read if you are looking for something about the life of an Equity Analyst in the city of London and what he gets up to.

Jun 16, 2012

Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.

Jun 16, 2012
Consultant2013:

I'm just finished my first year of my MBA and I am searching for some good summer reading. I am starting an internship at a boutique consulting firm specializing in website and mobile development.

What sort of stuff are you into? Fiction? Non-fiction? Work-related non-fiction (ugh)?

Jun 16, 2012

For Whom the Bell Tolls

"I am not sure who this 'Anonymous' person is - one thing is for certain, they have been one hell of a prolific writer" - Anonymous

Jun 16, 2012

Flaterfoon - Your suggestion looks very interesting - it is definitely on my list, thanks

GoHuskies - I am a Hemingway fan, but I haven't read this book yet

Holla_back - I am looking for non-fiction mostly. I will read great work-related non-fiction, but I am more interested in biographies or inspiring/anecdotal books that are not boring to read

Jun 16, 2012

Pricing the Future and The Accidental Investment Banker just landed in my pile

Jun 16, 2012

Good Bye Gordon Gekko by Anthony Scaramucci

Jun 16, 2012

50 shades

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

Jun 16, 2012

Megachange: The World in 2050

It gives you a good bird's eye view of a lot of the changes (demographic, political, technological) that the world is likely to see in the next few decades. It's good if you want to be able to speak even remotely intelligently about a variety of subjects so it's very consultant/networking friendly. A word of caution, it was written by the Economist so it's not the most enjoyable read.

Also, Kitchen Confidential - because Bourdain is the shit.

Jun 16, 2012

I'm starting my MBA this fall, getting ready for the wonderful world of case interviews (case in point, and case interview secrets)

I'm thinking about something non-business/interview prep next.

Jun 16, 2012

Agree about Black Swan. The first quarter is interesting, but starts dragging ass after that.

Currently reading "Den of Thieves." It's pretty good.

Jun 16, 2012

Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength

This book was actually recommended to me by a mentor at the big 4. It is excellent - describes how willpower acts like a muscle and needs to be trained, but can also be fatigued from over work. Sadly, this book kept me awake at night. There is an interview with Dr. Baumeister online, here is the link: http://www.consultingcafe.com/articles/dr-roy-baum...

Jun 16, 2012

Barbarians at the Gate, then Predators' Ball

Jun 16, 2012

Just finished reading The Accidental Investment Banker.

Currently reading Buffet Beyond Value.

You need to understand that a good firm, a profitable firm, and an attractive stock investment can be 3 unrelated things. -Epicurean Dealmaker

Jun 16, 2012

the power of habit

Jun 16, 2012

One billion customers

Jun 16, 2012

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

Jun 16, 2012

If you prefer fiction, you might want to read The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Bexter. Two superb author and an interesting book. Second and last book is published a few days ago and I'm currently waiting for it so I don't know it is good (but I expect it to be perfect). Additionally, I recommend anything written by Terry Pratchett.

Jun 16, 2012

"Antifragile" is way better than Black Swan- its Taleb's latest book. Also "On China" by Henry Kissinger was excellent

Jun 16, 2012

Superman - the New 52

Jun 16, 2012

The Rule of Four by Caldwell and Thomason

Jun 16, 2012

Four Hour Chef - by Tim Ferriss
The Quants

Jun 16, 2012
Unforseen:

Four Hour Chef - by Tim Ferriss

Reading this too.

Also reading:
The AIG Story
The Swerve: How the world became modern

Planning on reading The Privileges next.

Jun 16, 2012

Liar's Poker

Jun 16, 2012
Maxyboy712:

Liar's Poker

How is it?

Jun 16, 2012

Moby Dick

Jun 16, 2012

Sparknotes

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

Jun 16, 2012
Jun 16, 2012

This Time Is Different by Reinhart and Rogoff

You need to understand that a good firm, a profitable firm, and an attractive stock investment can be 3 unrelated things. -Epicurean Dealmaker

Jun 16, 2012

Al-Qaeda's 22 Tips For Evading Drones

    • 1
Jun 16, 2012
companion:

Al-Qaeda's 22 Tips For Evading Drones

Reported to FBI's NY field office.

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

Jun 16, 2012

Thinking, Fast and Slow

Jun 16, 2012

Extraordinary Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay
and Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition featuring Kate Upton

Jun 16, 2012

A Random Walk Down Wall Street and Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

Rise early, work hard, strike oil.

Jun 16, 2012

Influence is a good one.

Jun 16, 2012

Inside the House of Money - Drobny

Random Walk Down Wall Street - Malkiel

Jun 16, 2012

Saw a reddit post asking what the real-life analogue to Game of Thrones would be, and the popular consensus was the War of the Roses, which I believe was an inspiration for R.R. Martin to begin with. I thought that was an interesting premise by which to choose one's next read so I'm currently reading 'The Sunne in Splendour' by Penman. It's historical fiction so I'm eager to read the real history afterwards and see how loyal the book was. If most of this story is true then it truly is a remarkable period of history.

Jun 16, 2012

Blink

Jun 16, 2012

George Dangerfield's "The strange death of Liberal England, 1910 - 1914".

Jun 16, 2012

The Open Society and Its Enemies - by Karl Popper

Jun 16, 2012
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