Guide: Cold Contacting Investment Bankers For Non Targets

Big_Red's picture
Rank: Orangutan | 334

Hi Folks,

I posted a thread earlier in the month and there was a lot of interest in techniques and tips for cold contacting investment bankers so I thought I would share what I know.

First things first, I'm not an investment banker. I'm a data room sales rep with an extensive background in cold contacting (email/phone) investment bankers internationally. If you're working on M&A teams in North America there is a good chance I've called you. I've managed to create a pretty big network primarily from cold contacting so I'm here to offer basic sales tips and insights on methods that may work for you.

Note: I highly recommend reading the book How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. It's a pretty quick read that will help you understand how people communicate and how to leverage it to your will.

Disclaimer: I know very little about the recruiting cycles in banking and less about what specific traits/achievements recruiters look for. If anyone who has been through the process wants to chime in I will be happy to edit this post to create a better resource.

Getting Started

Before we get any further I wanted to emphasize that landing an interview will have very little to do with Investment banking. Sure, you may be able to pump out DCF models faster and more accurate than anyone else but it's irrelevant if you aren't given the opportunity to display your skills. In reality, getting an interview is a sales process in which you are selling yourself.

Cold Contacting Strategy

Anyone who tells you they enjoy cold calling and emailing people are lying to you. The reality is that you're going to interrupt someone and it's uncomfortable. The big thing to remember is that as long as you are polite and aren't overly aggressive with your contact volume very little bad can come out of cold contacting. Think about it, the last time someone cold called for a service you weren't interested in how long did you remember them for? 20 seconds? the same applies here.

There are 4 main topics relating to cold calling: tools, targets, timing and content.

Tools

Contact Information Gathering
Zoominfo/data.com are the two go to tools for getting phone numbers and email addresses. It's important to put an emphasis on direct phone lines. If the email isn't there it's alright, banks follow a uniform email format so a quick google search can land you any email(i.e [email protected])

Email Tracking
Email tracking is a very important tool that has become common practice in sales and marketing. There are a lot of providers but the only one I've tried and can vouch for is Yesware.

The service is about $15/month but completely worth it. You will be able to track when/how many times your email was opened, if the email has been forwarded, and if any attachments have been clicked or opened. This is all useful information in gauging interest and gives you a better idea of where you are gaining traction.

Targets

Admittedly, this section is the weakest in the guide. I know my targets in my sales process, but I know this probably changes in terms of recruitment. If anyone wants to chime in here I would love to edit this to be as accurate as possible. Anyways, I've taken my best guess and added insight on what I know.

Analysts: Probably not decision makers in hiring

-From experience, Analysts are understandably the least likely to donate their time. In the case of recruitment they aren't your best target.

Associates: Worth contacting but shouldn't be your first target

- Associates are usually more willing to spend a minute or two to help you out. I may be wrong but I would imagine their role is more evaluating people already in the recruitment funnel. As a non- target you may want to aim slightly higher.

VP/Director/Principal: These guys are your sweet spot and my recommendation for targets

- My initial thought was these titles would be too busy/senior to get a hold of and generally not willing to give you the time of day. I was wrong. Internal data proves that these targets spend the most time on the phone and have the highest conversion rates. These guys have more pull and may be able to help you make meaningful progress. Don't be afraid of their titles.

Managing Director: Obviously your ideal target, MD's are generally pretty social and definitely have the pull for you to create meaningful opportunities

- Unfortunately, these guys are heavily gated and hard to contact. In BB firms it's near impossible that a cold request actually gets seen by an MD. They literally pay secretaries to protect their time and to act as a filter to make sure only important inquiries get seen. In boutique firms you might have better luck, use your judgment for these guys.

Timing

Timing and follow-up are very important when trying to get in touch with someone.

in terms of specific timing, the best time to email/call someone is from 4-5pm and the best days are Thursday/Friday.

In sales we use a term called cadence, which is pretty much consistent steps to attempt to contact someone. I would recommend the following cadence:

Attempt 1: Email
-wait 1 week-
Attempt 2: Call & leave a voicemail. Explain that you are following up on an email from attempt 1
-Wait 3 business days-
Attempt 3: Call - No voicemail
-wait two business days-
Attempt 4: Follow-up email (make sure to send it as a reply to your initial email)

Move on.

At any point in this process, if they contact you, take them off the cadence. Use Excel to track each person and which step of the process they are on.

Content

General: Investment bankers are among the most intelligent and skeptical people on the planet. In general try to be concise and avoid bullshit.

Email
The goal of your emails should be to try and get someone on the phone or out for a beer/coffee. In person contact resonates 1000x greater than an email or call.

General Format:

Intro
Explain who you are and why you are reaching out.

Body
Explain why you want to work at X firm and why you should be considered.

If you are trying to advertise yourself stay away from subjective terms. I.e "I'm hardworking/motivated/etc" This is literally meaningless bullshit and everyone applying for any job will say it. Instead, provide objective examples that demonstrate this behavior. I.e I achieved an x GPA/I lead my schools finance club to achieve x/etc. You get the point.

Close
Now we go ahead with our "ask" which is for a call or meeting.

Avoid a general asks such as "I would love to meet for a coffee or beer". Instead, do some research. Find a place near their office and make your request specific. I.e "I would be willing to meet up and buy you a beer. How does X bar on Thursday or Friday evening work?"

Your complete email should be no longer than a paragraph. Once you're done email it to yourself and read it on your phone. How does it look? If you received an email like this would you read it? If not, make some changes.

Cold Calling
Plain and simple cold calling sucks. With that said, stats prove calling has a greater impact than email and can be a very powerful process when trying to achieve our goal.

You have to accept that you are going to interrupt someone but that's okay. Just like the email we want to keep this quick. Make sure to quickly identify yourself, bankers get called frequently by clients and it's important you bring down their guard asap.

In terms of wording, stick to a format similar to the email. briefly explain who you are and how you believe you can help their firm/team.

I hope this helps. I will be sticking around to answer any questions you guys have. The process can be pretty daunting, but keep in mind you only need one opportunity to work out to land a gig.

Mod Note (Andy): Best of 2016, this post ranks #43 for the past year

Comments (107)

Feb 3, 2016

Thanks for the guide, as a student at a non-target, I want to chime in on some of the things you said. I may be wrong, but this is just in my experience:

Contacting analysts / associates are probably the best point of contact coming from a non-target. They were most recently in your shoes and are really willing to stick their neck out for you if you can prove yourself to them. The way it seems, they're the main points of contact when it comes to recruiting at the non-target, and have significant pull.

Also, regarding the "objective examples," it seems that some people take that poorly. Especially the "I achieved a x.x GPA." I think some of the objective examples are best saved for the phone call when you actually get the chance to speak (or meet). If you want to show them you have a high GPA to try to prove your worth, what I do is attach my resume and say "if you want to learn more about me, I've attached my resume" or something along those lines.

I think most of the other information you've posted is really helpful. Thanks a lot for this.

    • 8
Feb 4, 2016

I think you're right on this one. As i mentioned, roles in recruitment isn't something i'm familiar with.

I also agree with the GPA point that may not be the best example, however, stand by the logic of providing objective examples of how you can help.

Thousands of people apply for IBD roles, you have to create value and provide a reason for people to give you a chance.

Feb 5, 2016

Thanks to OP for this post - wish I had this when I was going through the process.

I want to echo what dartzrip is saying. I'm also from a non-target, and after quite a bit of rejection and preserving recently was offered full-time at a BB in IBD. I've found that contacting junior people can be so helpful for two reasons. First, there's the chance they like you (for reasons above) and they're willing to set something up with someone more senior. Second, even if there's not much he/she can do, at least when you do have the chance to speak with someone more senior you can share what you've learned about the role and let them know you've put in the time to meet some of the people you'd (potentially) be working with. This is especially relevant for us who have to rely more on networking to get a seat at the table.

This was my strategy - meet with as many analysts/associates as I could so that when the time came to speak with the VPs and MDs I had a much better understanding of analysts' work, and I could show them that I've put a lot of effort in to learn.

OP, thanks again for this post. And good luck to all my fellow non-targets

    • 3
Dec 27, 2016
  • How do you suggest people win at this game when you've revealed the game plan for new potential players in this realm who are cold emailing that adds to the queue of cold emails of existing players using similar strategies?
  • What will make one cold email jump above another cold email vs work emails and other casual emails of this individual?
  • How come there is no mention of using "Read Receipt" or "Delivery Receipt" to ensure logistically the email got sent, delivered, and received?
  • Where would you suggest the audience to go if existing markets are crowded already and they are looking for new fertile grounds to cultivate their own individual and respective careers?
Feb 5, 2016

thanks for the post!

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

Feb 5, 2016

Always happy to contribute where I can. Thanks for the formatting help if that was you.

Feb 5, 2016

Thanks for the advice. I am in the process of cold emailing PWM firms for a summer internship. I have gotten a couple of responses from VPs and one MD. How can I turn the informational interview into an internship?

Feb 5, 2016

edit

Feb 5, 2016

Nice guide. Thanks for putting it together. I actually wasn't aware about that email tracking service. That's pretty sweet, and I will certainly think about using it in the future.

Cold calling/emailing is probably one of my least favorite things to do, and I used to avoid it like the plague when I was younger. Always made me feel uncomfortable. Social phobia is a bitch. But once you buck up and learn to do it, it's an invaluable tool.

Best Response
Feb 5, 2016

With all due respect, I completely disagree with 90% of your post.

Your Tools section offers great advice. I would add that Mailtester.com is a good way to verify emails. For tracking, I just used Excel, but can see why a sales person would need something more high tech.

I would suggest to never ever cold call an investment banker. Think about how busy they are and in the middle of their work, some random college student calls them to network. I have probably spent 100 hours in the past year helping college students out because I know how tough it is to break in, but even I would be extremely annoyed if I got an unsolicited call. This is even more annoying for senior bankers because they spend all day on the phone. When you call them unsolicited, you are literally preventing them from doing their job (i.e. speaking with clients).

Your Targets section is probably spot-on for sales, but I would not recommend this strategy for college students. College students should be contacting analysts and associates. VPs and up are the only ones who can walk into HR an almost guarantee you an interview, but most of them are too busy, too far removed from the process, unable to identify with you, broke into the industry when it was not as competitive, etc. I would still network with VPs and above (the best advice I have received came from them), but focus 95% of your effort on analysts an associates. They are closer to your age, most likely networked like you are doing, went through the process in the past two to three years, have more time to devote to helping you, etc.

My experience with timing was different. I had the best luck sending cold emails Tuesdays at 10AM. My logic was that if the emails are sent on Tuesdays, you are not bombarding anyone on a Monday morning, but there still is plenty of time during the week to connect. Thursdays and Fridays are too close to the weekend, and it is easier to write your cold email off as "I'll contact that guy next week".

I would not suggest contacting bankers four times. That is a recipe for disaster and a clear demonstration that you cannot take a hint (a terrible quality for an analyst). I would suggest one email and a follow up email a week later. That's all. By contacting them more often, you're risking your email getting forwarded to everyone with a "do not hire" note.

I think that your Content section is not correct for college students. Don't send a novel. All you need is a quick "Hi, I'm a junior at Harvard. I am interest in pursuing a career in IB and was wondering if you had some time this week to discuss your career and experience at Goldman Sachs. Thank you." That's all. Everyone who gets your email knows exactly what you want. Writing more than what I suggested is waste of your time (a terrible quality for an analyst) and a complete waste of time for the person reading your email. You want the email to be just long enough to get the message across, but short enough where I get the gist by just looking at the lock screen on my iPhone or the Outlook new email pop-up. Your wording for meeting up sounds very awkward. You're not meeting with your grandfather- you're meeting with some guy close to your age.

I hope this does not sound negative because it's not supposed to. I just wanted to point out what I think does not apply to college students. And, please, stop cold calling me about data rooms ;) You'd have more luck if you took my group out to a bar, a golf course, bowling, etc.

    • 12
Feb 5, 2016

Sil,

Thanks for your feedback. I'll try to address each point.

  1. Mailtester is great, I will add that to the tools section.
  2. I disagree with your statement "never ever cold call an investment banker". People are generally more receptive over the phone than you might think. I do agree that it would be wise to ask "is this a good time for you to chat for a minute" it gives your target an opportunity to exit the call if they aren't interested. I will add this above.
  3. Based on yours/others feedback I'm going to completely change the targets section. As you mentioned, this is good for sales but not recruitment- thanks for the input.
  4. Timing- I gathered all the numbers from internal data. I understand the logic behind your post, but based off experience I would stick to my suggested timing.
  5. Contact: After second look, four times may be too many for a recruit. I've changed it to two emails and one call. As you mentioned earlier in your post, bankers are very busy. Many times you will be contacting someone who is willing to help, but not able to at the moment. Contacting three times helps combat this.
  6. I also somewhat disagree your messaging for emails, if you're a target this will work. But Non targets didn't go to schools that will automatically have them considered for ibd jobs. They have to mention something very brief that sparks interest. I do agree that the messaging can be more casual now that the target has been changed to Analysts/Associated- initially when I wrote that I was under the impression that we would be shooting higher up. I will take a look.

Again, Thanks for the feedback. I'm admittedly out of my element in regards to recruitment and any feedback helps.

P.S On my downtime I will do my best to find out what firm you're with and give you a cold call :D

Feb 5, 2016

I agree that Tuesday is the best day to reach out. I normally send out emails around 3-5PM and get a lot of replies from senior bankers especially (day is winding down, etc).

Feb 5, 2016

Sil is absolutely spot-on.

To add, and this is just based on me personally so results may vary, but I hate receiving cold calls - I answer the phone assuming its a client, buyer/investor on an active deal, or one of my many bosses - if I want to talk to someone regarding networking I will respond via email and set up a time. Regarding the email itself, I agree that short and succinct is best, highlighting why you're reaching out, where you are currently, and asking for a time to set up a call. Guys in this industry generally aren't a-holes, their just busy...don't be annoying, but absolutely follow up, and then get to the point. I think most folks enjoy helping people out when they're genuine and respectful of the time they are asking for.

    • 1
Feb 5, 2016

Thanks for the feedback. From what I've gathered I may have missed the mark on cold calls/targets. Cold calling does work in sales, I've had a lot of great conversations with bankers, but you're right, it may not work in terms of recruiting. I will take your/Sil's feedback and incorporate it in the changes.

  • Anonymous Monkey
  •  Feb 5, 2016

yeah- this kids never had to work for anything. Cold calling works. period. The article was great.

    • 1
Feb 10, 2016

Test comment.

Jun 24, 2016

hey please check your PM

Dec 27, 2016

Agree pretty much entirely with Sil on this one.

-Definitely do not pay for an email database site
-Do not cold call me out of the blue
-Analysts and associates should be your go to and can often have more pull in pushing resumes through than you might think
-Do not email four times
-The last thing I want to do is follow up on a random networking email late on a Friday. That is 100% going to wait until Monday
-No need to send a novel

Also you should always attach a resume in my opinion.

    • 3
Mar 16, 2017

On the content section -- "Harvard" is your spark. If you are applying from Blue Mountain State a basic email won't work.

Feb 5, 2016

Disagree with a couple things but useful post.

Do you have a data set saying that Friday night was the best time to cold email? I've always assumed that is the worst possible time to cold email. They're in a rush to finish and get the fuck out, so they will push back responding to your email and probably forget about it.

Feb 5, 2016

The data set measures combined results for calls/emails. I will take a further look but there is enough feedback here to suggest Tuesday is a good day for emails. Will add it in

Dec 27, 2016

Unless you have some personal connections to them (e.g. your dad's a client), they won't talk to you. 90% of people won't reply - actually, that's an understatement. More like 95%.

Of the 5% that reply to you, maybe 1% (aka just one guy) will vouch for you. But hey, sometimes you only need one guy.

Dec 27, 2016

How do you feel about homeless people bugging you for change? At least they probably need help more than you do, and that takes less time and effort.

You better be bringing something pretty great to the table if you're going to bother me randomly in real life. On WSO, I think that's kind of the understood point, and either I'll respond to PMs, or I won't. But if someone did this on LinkedIn then there's a 1% chance I'd respond.

Dec 27, 2016

I am looking to RE finance, but I email everyone. A guy from a target in the RE group at a top bank just forwarded my resume around for their analyst program, so don't limit yourself.

I pretty much just blast out tons of emails. Cast a wide net and you'll definitely find some helpful people. I say something along the lines of "hi my name is XX, I worked at XX this summer and am trying to transition over to (their industry), was wondering if you would be willing to take some time to talk about your experiences in the field, appreciate the advice and hope to hear back from you." I'd say my response rate is probably 15-20%. Also RE generally has need-based hiring and not structured programs, but a lot of the guys who are working at firms with structured analyst programs have offered to forward my resume.

I can tell a lot of these guys have never had a college kid cold email them before. It might be different for general IB/consulting judging from the posts on this site, but this is what I've experienced.

    • 1
Dec 27, 2016

If they don't respond, I will send them another email a few days later. If they still don't respond, shoot for someone else. The worst in when you know they read your email because they view your linkedin profile (after you don't look at theirs), but never give you a response.

I've gotten some good feedback and even have met some MDs at top MM firms. But I also call to "follow up on the email I sent" as well.

Dec 27, 2016

There's def. an art to cold-emailing people with no visible connections. Just b specific with y u are connecting with him/her and only her. As opposed to some other random MD at the same firm. Response rates are low tho, def. below the 30% line.

Baby you're the perfect shape, baby you're the perfect weight. Treat me like my birthday, I want it this way and I want it that way. It makes a man feel good baby.

Dec 27, 2016

You probably aren't doing anything wrong. It's very hard to get people you have no relationship with to respond unless you can really bring something to the table. And that's pretty unusual at the undergraduate level. You'd probably get a better return on investment if you spent the time finding more alumni to email.

Feb 6, 2016

This entire thread is pretty useful but one question I have for all of you... What would you suggest as a Subject to a cold email? I don't want the email to get filtered to spam or sound like some dumb match making spam email lol. The best I came up with is "Looking for more information" or "Looking for info session". I think "Looking to connect" sounds weird. Any thoughts on this aspect?

Feb 7, 2016

Great question, I would recommended using something like "Quick Question". It has a pretty high open rate and it's pretty genuine to the subject of your email.

Jul 9, 2016

"School Name Student looking for Career Advice" or "Company Name Intern looking for Career Advice"

Dec 27, 2016

First off, what you did takes more than two balls. I think even the experience of just cold calling makes a huge difference, and at the same time can be extremely humbling. It was not really clear in the post but did you get an offer?

Dec 27, 2016

I guess I missed the most important part in my post, lol.

Yes, I did get multiple offers.

    • 1
Dec 27, 2016

Dec 27, 2016

kill it gratz op

Dec 27, 2016

Post made me wet.

no really, very impressive and good for you. glad to see more people with balls on wso.

Dec 27, 2016

This is what more people need to emulate. Congratulations to you, well-earned.

Dec 27, 2016

Congrats!

Dec 27, 2016

how did you acquire everyone's email...linkedin? Or people's name.

Where did you start actually?

I banana back

Dec 27, 2016

also how did you ask for referrals?

I banana back

Dec 27, 2016

Congrats Whiskey.

Dec 27, 2016

Thanks all for the kind words!

Dec 27, 2016

Well if this doesn't put shit in perspective I don't know what does. Congrats!

Dec 27, 2016

...

Dec 27, 2016

Is anyone else wondering how this guy got internships w. congressmen and senators going to University of Bumfuck nowhere?

Dec 27, 2016
BigBucks:

Is anyone else wondering how this guy got internships w. congressmen and senators going to University of Bumfuck nowhere?

No, not really.

Dec 27, 2016
BigBucks:

Is anyone else wondering how this guy got internships w. congressmen and senators going to University of Bumfuck nowhere?

Congressmen and senators tend to hire from their home districts. Not too hard to figure out.

As I've told you before, congrats man. Fuck you for not putting me under friends though. :(

Dec 27, 2016

Well done Whiskey, you've earned this. Now just kill it this summer and get the offer, it gets even better from here.

Appreciated the shout-out.

Dec 27, 2016

Congrats man! This indeed is inspiring.

Dec 27, 2016

congrats dude--love hearing these stories

Dec 27, 2016

Silver Banana for you. Although I am a few years older than you, stories like these inspire me and challenge all of us to be better. I scour these boards and waste hours of my time every week but even a single story like this makes everything worth it in the end.

Dec 27, 2016

GATDAMN WHISKEY!

I thought you slithered in via URM channels... Or tennis...

jk. Congrats dude. WELL deserved.

P.S. "So I told him I took a cab from the hotel to get there." I would not work for someone who didn't at least crack some semblance of smile at that.

Dec 27, 2016

Vancouver, thanks for the words. Hopefully there are many more stories like this to come.

Dec 27, 2016

LMAO I did the same thing as you Whiskey and had the same results, but I only landed one FT offer. I remember interviewing at one boutique last spring that had a preference for Colombia/Cornell kids meanwhile I had a degree from an absolute non-target. One of the MDs asked me the same exact question "How did you get in here" I replied "I took the elevator up just like you did".

'We're bigger than U.S. Steel"

Dec 27, 2016

I am going to go out on a limb and say you didn't get an offer after insulting the MD like that...

Dec 27, 2016

Wow, what a crazy few years it must have been for you. Congrats man, you deserved it!

Dec 27, 2016

And of all of my interviews, the most memorable one was the super day at Baird Chicago. One of the VP looked at my resume and asked me, "what the fuck is University of xxxx / xxxx University, and how did you get here?" I knew from that point on, no matter what I said, I would not have gotten the offer. So I told him I took a cab from the hotel to get there. No smile, no smirk, you could smell the tension in the room. Whatever, dickhead.

^ best part. That's some tough talk coming from someone who a) works in the midwest and b) works for a pissant bank like Baird.

    • 1
Dec 27, 2016

where did you end up?

Dec 27, 2016

So did you get an offer?

Dec 27, 2016

Haven't officially accepted an offer yet, but will be at a BB.

Dec 27, 2016

pshhhh i got more ballz than you brah.

I don't accept sacrifices and I don't make them. ... If ever the pleasure of one has to be bought by the pain of the other, there better be no trade at all. A trade by which one gains and the other loses is a fraud.

Dec 27, 2016

Just wondering if you could clarify the "5 roudns of informational interviews"

From what I understand:

You got in touch with bankers and ask if you could talk with them briefly
Now did this happen with the same banker 5 times in a row or did they just keep referring you on up the chain?

Dec 27, 2016

Inspirational story. Love it.

Dec 27, 2016

Inspirational story. Love it.

Dec 27, 2016

Am I the only one wondering what happened after telling the guy you took a cab from the hotel to get to get to the interview?

That is so lame it goes around and becomes funny.

Dec 27, 2016

Did you really have a 3.2 gpa?

Congrats.

Dec 27, 2016
leveragedbanker:

Did you really have a 3.2 gpa?

Congrats.

I really did.

Dec 27, 2016

I say "good on ya, Whiskey!" Never get tired of success stories. Thanks for posting!

"Now go get your f'n shinebox!"

Dec 27, 2016

Very inspiring stuff, thanks for the post.

Dec 27, 2016

Congrats, definitely an inspiring post. I'm going through the process myself now, and am reaching out to analysts / associates. When you emailed and/or called higher-ups (VPs, Directors), how were those emails / calls different from the ones you had with associates/analysts? I usually have just been asking for career advice and trying to get in front of bankers and recruiters, rather than straight-up telling them why I should be hired. I guess I need to change tactics. Thanks!

Dec 27, 2016

Great job man! Great story!

Dec 27, 2016

Congrats! Very inspirational - I came from a similar background.

Dec 27, 2016

can't you get that interviewer fired for that? Seriously. What the fuck.

Dec 27, 2016

Also coming from a school with "baby sitting positions on my school's career site" so this is hands down my favorite inspirational post. Thank you!

Nothing is true; everything is permitted.

Dec 27, 2016

Reading this is just motivational. I'm searching and getting into the cold-email/calling the companies, VPs etc.. Thanks for sharing

Dec 27, 2016

+1 SBBBBBBBB

Dec 27, 2016

Sick story man congrats

Dec 27, 2016
Whiskey5:

And of all of my interviews, the most memorable one was the super day at Baird Chicago. One of the VP looked at my resume and asked me, "what the fuck is University of xxxx / xxxx University, and how did you get here?" I knew from that point on, no matter what I said, I would not have gotten the offer. So I told him I took a cab from the hotel to get there. No smile, no smirk, you could smell the tension in the room. Whatever, dickhead.

This is awesome. Congrats!

Dec 27, 2016

Great Job!

Dec 27, 2016

+1 thanks for an entertaining read.

Bitch please, I love bananas! If you found my advice useful, hit me up with one.

Dec 27, 2016

Silver banana for this great post. +1

Dec 27, 2016

incredible story, about to attempt the same journey.

would appreciate all the technicality advice you can give if you don't mind pming me

Dec 27, 2016

Hey Whiskey,

Congrats - very sick story. I was wondering if you could elaborate on the informational interview process. How did you do it ? Did you simply cold email them telling them you were interested in ibanking and wanted to get on the phone with them? Once you got them on the phone how was it like? Do you go into telling them you want to interview at their firm?

Thanks!

Dec 27, 2016

Hey Whiskey,

Congrats - very sick story. I was wondering if you could elaborate on the informational interview process. How did you do it ? Did you simply cold email them telling them you were interested in ibanking and wanted to get on the phone with them? Once you got them on the phone how was it like? Do you go into telling them you want to interview at their firm?

Thanks!

Aug 10, 2018

Can you possibly PM me?

Feb 7, 2016

Amazing post. Thank you so much.

Dec 27, 2016

Less needy, be more specific (e.g. make them feel more special), and less about what THEY can do for YOU.

Gee golly. I work in TX and this kid wants to work here too! We have so much in common!

Bottomline is you want to portray yourself as a winner who he'd be lucky to have on his deal team (obviously don't make the ask in the first cold email). Talk about your accomplishments and figure out a way how that ties into what he does. You're eager to learn more and would appreciate X amount of time. No one likes beggars.

Dec 27, 2016

Thanks for the advice. Surprisingly, I actually got 2 out of 4 responses so far today but I definitely agree with what you said, especially the part about making it more specific about why I'm reaching out to them specifically. I will definitely make adjustments based on what you said.

Dec 27, 2016

My cold email is more along the lines of...

Dear Mr. ___________,

I graduated from ________ in 2015 and am pursuing a career in investment sales. Since graduating, I have taught myself ARGUS and financial modeling while working part-time as a project manager for a small construction/development company in NYC.

Would you have a few minutes to speak with me about your experiences? I've attached my resume for a more substantial look at my background.

Best,

If you managed to get a referral to someone else, make sure you include that in the subject. Also change the first sentence to:

I was speaking with [person's name] about pursuing a career in investment sales and he said I should get in touch with you. I graduated from ______ in 2015 and have since taught myself Argus and financial modeling while working blah blah blah

Dec 27, 2016

I'm certainly being nit-picky but that "quite frankly" strikes me as incredibly disingenuous. Otherwise the advice in the other comments covers it.

Dec 27, 2016

I'm always a fan of introducing yourself first. Try to read your email from the reader's perspective. He doesn't know you at all and his mouse is hovering over the trash icon.

"Dear Mr. ____ I graduated from ____ and am pursuing a career in investments sales..."

"...wait, who is this again?" looks at long email "I'm not reading this to find out" clicks trash

Feb 7, 2016

I'd like to give another vote for Dale Carnegie's book. Amazing!

    • 1
Jun 21, 2017

.

Dec 27, 2016

Exactly where I started and I ended up in a BB.

Dec 27, 2016

What were your stat though?

Dec 27, 2016

This is your starting point...

Dec 27, 2016
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Dec 27, 2016
Feb 10, 2016
Mar 28, 2017