BNP Paribas Investment Banking

Has anyone had any experience with them? Thanks!

Working at BNP Paribas

BNP Paribas is one of the largest banks by assets and they headquartered in Paris France. So, they are a much stronger bank in continental Europe.

Some of their key strengths:

  • Coverage Groups
  • Project Finance
  • Derivatives
  • Structured Finance

The New York office is notably French. They have a very strong French culture and they prefer french candidates or French-speaking candidates. They have better hours generally than other banks on the street but they are not as good at developing junior talent.

from certified user aadpepsi

BNP Paribas is a very well respected name in the European circuit. Although they may not have as strong a footprint in the US, if you are interested in doing international corporate finance or structured finance, it would be worth it to explore them further.

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Comments (130)

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 10:13am

I have some removed interactions with them, nothing too indepth.

New head for corporate coverage (custodian role) since the last group head left. Main group in Paris might send someone new down or hire locally. Expect changes and reshuffling from a headcount perspective.

Divison is split heavily into different teams that either dominated by Americans or French, it would help if you spoke or understood French to better position yourself. This rule applies to the entire bank, people who speak and understand French will have a leg up on a colleague who doesn't.

I've only heard good things about the coverage division, best in europe (quick google search will corroborate this) At least 10-12hours work day. That's about all that I know

i'm not smart enough to do everything, but dumb enough to try anything
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:11pm

BNP Paribas = highly racist (Originally Posted: 05/01/2012)

Most racist company on the street. Don't expect any career progression or any form of support or understanding if you're colored or speak with a non-french accent. I even learned french (fluently) for these fuckers. French recruits get moved up while non-french (non-white for that matter) just get moved around, either parallel or lower positions, regardless of your job performance.

 
Oct 9, 2019 - 6:51pm

asiamoney:

Coincidentally, I believe that they are one of the only large banks in the U.S. that won't sponsor international students for FT (and won't let them apply to their summer internship program).

Thats not true
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:21pm

hungryhobo:
Well this sucks since I'll be interning there this summer...

Pick up Rosetta Stone in French. The only thing they love more than elf shoes and skinny pants is the French language. Be prepared to be in meetings and elevators where you think you were in Paris. Just do a good job and try to leverage an offer to a BB.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:22pm

Mr.Pitt:
It's the same in Germany, if you don't speak the language almost perfectly, you are not going to make it.

German investment banks expect you to learn German, the native language of the country you want to work in? How dare they!

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:23pm

In Germany and France, even though they speak English pretty well, some people simply refuse to talk to you in English. They'd think like if you're in our country then speak or learn our language.

But in case you do speak the language, you're almost one of them.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:29pm

Beside Japan, France was the only country where I've experienced apparent and shameless racism, despite that I do speak the language in native proficiency.

BNP Paribas and Societe Generale are awful in this regard.

I may not be on the Jedi Council, but I sure am great with the Force.

See my WSO blog posts

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:33pm

Irresistible:
BNP, SoGen, CS, UBS all bias on European.

If Arabs are not happy with it, they can start their own firms and be bias on Arabs. Same goes for Indians, Asians, etc.

Not sure why people are mad about this (in general).

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:37pm

Thought your name might be ironic or something. I don't disagree that private businesses should have a high degree of leniency in conducting their business, but your initial response was for other groups to start their own racist firms in retaliation. That's the part I object to.

Human nature says I should rape women, rarely shower, and hit anyone who I dislike over the head with a big boulder. It says I should try to enslave black people if given the opportunity to do so. These things are probably as valid in our society as racism is.

Blacks built most of our buildings; Asians built the transcontinental railroad. White people made business deals to facilitate all this (as a soon-to-be banker, I respect this plenty, but it's not all that back-breaking).

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:39pm

cokeaddict:
..your initial response was for other groups to start their own racist firms in retaliation. That's the part I object to.

Why would you object? It's similar to you in your house. I cain't tell you who to invite inside your home because it's your private property.

cokeaddict:

Human nature says I should rape women, rarely shower, and hit anyone who I dislike over the head with a big boulder. It says I should try to enslave black people if given the opportunity to do so. These things are probably as valid in our society as racism is.

My point was to show that it is part of our nature and not to be shocked by it like if it was something alien to us.
If Arabs did a ton of sacrifices to build a system that generated prosperity and liberty, heck, of course that I'd be bias with fellow Arabs (at equal competence, obviously).

cokeaddict:

Blacks built most of our buildings; Asians built the transcontinental railroad. White people made business deals to facilitate all this (as a soon-to-be banker, I respect this plenty, but it's not all that back-breaking).

What I'm interested in is who was the brain behind the creation of those buildings, those railroads etc. And clearly, back then, it wasn't blacks nor asians.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:41pm

Family and race are not analogous to each other... if you don't see that, we just don't have enough of a common ground to even argue anymore. You're saying that race is a valid basis for judging people or treating people, and I disagree. I'm not "shocked" by racism - I'm merely suggesting that it's wrong, "natural" as it may be.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:42pm

cokeaddict:
Family and race are not analogous to each other... if you don't see that, we just don't have enough of a common ground to even argue anymore. You're saying that race is a valid basis for judging people or treating people, and I disagree. I'm not "shocked" by racism - I'm merely suggesting that it's wrong, "natural" as it may be.

What I'm saying is, if one race made most of the sacrifices to create a system that enhances the survival chances of our species, then we shouldn't be surprised if that race eats first.

I'm not basing my jugement on the color of the skin. Whomever enhances our survival capabilities, will run the show.

And the reason we see racism is simply because the population feel like certain groups in society, did not enhanced the survival chances enough VS the benefits they receive.

If tomorrow, black people start studying in STEM fields and are able to generate new technologies that makes our society better, I can guarantee you that we'll all be singing Kumbaya hand in hand and 'racism' will be defeated.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:48pm

mrbeancounter:
Most of you don't realize your heavy accents in what you call near native fluency.

While I agree that continental Europeans tend to be self-centered, Anshu Jain is the new co-CEO
of Deutsche Bank based in London.

Jain is an outlier. Although Jain deserved the CEO title, the Germans didn't want a non-German to be CEO without a Co. Look for anyone else at DB management who is non-German (you won't even find a French / British / Italian). Same can be said about BNP and SocGen. The same glass ceiling doesn't exist in the US. I don't know if people here are Mad Men fans, but remember when Lane Pryce said he loved the US because: "I've been here 10 months and no one's ever asked me where I went to school." I think that's a difference between the US and Europe.

While it's a problem of non-diversity in foreign banks, which also just might be due to lack of foreigners immigrating into the country, the bigger problem is the glass ceiling at foreign banks in the US. While it's not a problem at DB, UBS, or CS. I've heard it's a big problem at the French banks.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:50pm
  1. nothing you say can humiliate me, this is an online forum, I am anonymous

  2. Abdel the views you subscribe to are racist at best, catastrophically self-destructive at worst

  3. Many human beings of different races have contributed to the human experience, one's contribution should not be an excuse to alienate other human beings, especially considering no idea is original, they are all derived from failed ideas, Thomas Edison had hundreds of failed light-bulbs to build off from inventors outside the U.S., should we start discriminatory electric companies based on the fact that the white man pioneered harnessing electricity?

  4. Another note about human ingenuity, it means nothing without manual labor to carry out the task, credit is both due and deserved for those who did back-breaking work for little to no pay. When you say "worked hard" to make society better, why would you completely exclude manual labor? Perhaps it shouldn't be as valued as the idea itself, but its valuable nonetheless.

  5. Asians/Indians have made great strides in the past 2 decades in STEM fields, this has not stopped them from being referred to as chinks, towel heads, terrorists etc. Your garbage about Blacks innovating in STEM fields defeating racism is just that, garbage.

  6. A society where firms hire by race would be an inefficient and polarized one, to recommend this course of action is the height of ignorance.

you would think I wouldn't have to say this as this forum is supposed to be populated with those who can analyze a situation with equanimity but, of course, I must be absurd for thinking anything regarding race can be calmly and objectively thought through.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:51pm

BigBucks:

5. Asians/Indians have made great strides in the past 2 decades in STEM fields, this has not stopped them from being referred to as chinks, towel heads, terrorists etc. Your garbage about Blacks innovating in STEM fields defeating racism is just that, garbage.
.

ha bro, that was so weak. And to think that you had the gut to tell me : ''The fact you think you're worth arguing with is laughable.'' is just too damn funny.

Let me adress the only semi-valid point you made, that is 'argument' #5 about Asians/Indians. Few things:

1) Asians and Indians go to the US to study in universities built and generated by the system white people built. I don't see white people rushing to spend hundred of thousands of dollars to go to U of Mumbai (if that even exists).

2) In my point, I said, ''if they're able to generate new technologies that make our lives better''. I remember seeing alot of asian/indian PhDs but I don't recall seeing alot of inventors. Maybe their kids will (those PhDs were probably looking for financial stability, so instead of doing research, they went to work). If I'm correct, then the perception and the name calling will eventually stop.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:49pm

^^^ that was rubbish!

"After you work on Wall Street it’s a choice, would you rather work at McDonalds or on the sell-side? I would choose McDonalds over the sell-side.” - David Tepper
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:52pm

That was my only valid point? really? Not, manual labor is not as valuable as idea generation but it should still be valued. Not, many races have contributed to the human experience and no one single race can claim the invention of modern society. Not, if we have an environment populated with racist firms that would be highly inefficient.Tell me, in what way do you dispute the validity of these claims?

p.s. your whole thought process that "white ppl built this country" therefore they should reap the benefits is the same thought process that goes into "black ppl suffered for this country" therefore we should seek reparations, it is so stupid its astounding.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:56pm

Im gonna assume the OP is more bitter about being in BO...producers move up regardless of race, background, or language...if they dont then they move to another bank...overall, Ive never seen anything of the sort with any european bank

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:57pm

Bernankey:
Im gonna assume the OP is more bitter about being in BO...producers move up regardless of race, background, or language...if they dont then they move to another bank...overall, Ive never seen anything of the sort with any european bank

I haven't seen anyone getting robbed/killed today, I guess the world is now a wonderful peaceful place :)
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 3:59pm

How is this new? The board of Deutsche Bank threw a fit and had an aneurysm when they knew that Anshu Jain would have to take over as head of the bank since there was no one as qualified as him to lead. The fact that the board was concerned that the Deutsche Bank would "neglect it's German roots" was just a euphemism that Jain wasn't German, though I'd doubt they'd have an issue if the CEO was another white European from a different country. They literally installed Jürgen Fitschen just so that the bank could have a german "co-CEO". And Germany is supposed to be more friendly than France when it comes to this sort of thing (just look a Sarkozy moving to the hard right on immigration issues...)

Europe claims to be kinder, more equality loving, etc than America, but it's not true. They are very real barriers towards advancement there. What I love about the USA is that if you prove you can make somebody a lot of money and kiss up when it's appropriate you're going to kill it. That's just not the way Europe does things unfortunately.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:00pm

Its true what Dhanam just said. Even though the US has a few flaws, our lame political system, we still are more tolerant and encourage hard work. Its scares me sometimes to see how the French are going towards a very dismal path. I guess there is a reason why the EU is going down the drain. -no offense to the hard working monkeys in EU.

USA 1000, Europe 0 ?

USA USA USA!!

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:04pm

Anyone familiar with BNP Paribas Structured Finance? (Originally Posted: 12/28/2009)

How is it in the US? I only know it is supposed to be a leader globally... anyone familiar with the issue?

Or what's the career path in general for structured finance? Since it is more specialized I assume the analyst won't follow the typical IBD path

Thanks!

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:06pm

Do you know which group it is ? Asset Finance (Aircraft , Export , Real Estate) ? Leveraged and Project Finance ? Corporate Acquisition ? Energy & Commodity ?

They seem to be good at Ship / Airport Finance
Dec 2009 Air Finance Journal Ranking 2009 Airfinance Journal
No.1 Arranger of debt into Japanese Operating Lease deals (Arranger)
No.1 Arranger of export credit for aircraft (combined Boeing, Airbus and ATR) (Arranger)

in Energy & Commodity
Jul 2009 Thomson Reuters Energy and Commodities H1 2009 rankings Acquisitions Monthly
- No.2 U.S. Oil & Gas Agent
- No.2 U.S. Oil & Gas Bookrunner

in Project Finance
Jul 2009 Thomson Reuters Project Finance H1 2009 rankings Thomson Reuters
- No.5 U.S. Utilities Agent
- No.4 U.S. Utilities Bookrunner

Take a look at http://cib.bnpparibas.com/awards-rankings
Once again, they're better in EMEA / Asia Pacific

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:11pm

BNPP had huge restructuring in their structured finance department about a year ago and aircraft finance took a big hit. The French banks just can't fund decade long USD asset loans anymore.

A lot of the traditional heavyweight commercial banks in this space have exited this business and have been shedding their asset books and lease portfolios which have been picked up by the likes of SMBC. A lot will depend on the geography that you're looking at as in the US/Europe, airlines can tap into capital markets for financing where you see IB players in this business. Also you should expand your search to leasing companies.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:12pm

kingp... thank you for the insight!!
I knew the European banks were decreasing the scale of their investments in aviation, but I didn't know how extensive things were. So is it safe to say that most banks looking to build portfolios are in Asia?
Believe me, I have been trying the leasing companies... I'm actually expanding my search to consider the banks now and OEMs. But to be honest I'm moreso interested in the banks and lessors. I spent time at an OEM and am not keen on going back to Seattle. That's why I'm trying to figure out a way to get into banking... I think networking will be more effective than applying to reqs with my background.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:13pm

BNPP had probably one of the strongest platforms (after RBS exited) on the lending side and when they were forced to restructure, this team along with ECA was hit the worst. The guys I knew of either left or managed to move to other parts of the organization.

It's a niche sector that requires balance sheet dedication so look for whoever is currently underwriting deals. The Japanese banks (SMBC, BTMU...) have taken on market share from what I've seen but you also have players like BOC Aviation building up their portfolios.

I would definitely think you need to network through linkedin, conferences etc given that it is a very specialized sector. Coming from OEM might help you somehow as I've seen ex OEM marketing guys end up on the banking side (specifically to leverage their connections with the carriers).

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:23pm

parfather:

For MF PE in London you'll need a second language as well as a BB background. For MM PE in London you'll need the ACA.

I summered in a well known MM IB in London. Plenty of Analysts and Associates exiting to well regarded MM PE firms including 2 to Bridgepoint, and they don't have ACA.

 
  • Anonymous Monkey's picture
  • Anonymous Monkey
  • Rank: Chimp
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:25pm

Tier 1?...they are Tier 1 in France, Tier 2 in other Europe, Tier 3 in the US and nowhere in Asia.

If you have a choice, perhaps SocGen would be a better bet.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:27pm

BNP seems to be a big player in the field as shown by the league table -

Japanese and French banks own this space. The only people who care about PF are PF people. That said, you'd be doing more than your typical IB kid.
Mergers & Inquisition wrote a good piece on this.

for a first year analyst you should expect 60-90k total compensation (base,bonus)

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:28pm

BNP Paribas - How far would you put it from a BB? (Originally Posted: 10/23/2010)

Hi,

I wanted to know what your views on BNP Paribas are?

Looks clearly to be one of the banks that emerged from the GFC relatively strengthened compared to peers. This is already one of the biggest players in Europe with ambitious growth plans for Asia and North America. How far would you put it from BB like DB or CS ?

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:30pm

a friend of mine worked in HK. A lot of them came over from DB, Citi, etc. Heard the co-worker relationship is great with very little office politics, which is why people stay around. Like other BBs, they frequently poach key rainmakers with connections to the Chinese govt, but I am pretty sure they are not in the top 10 in terms of deal flow (they're one of the few foreign banks I can think of that didn't get on the AgBank IPO this year).

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:32pm

BNP Paribas - How is this firm in the US? (Originally Posted: 03/04/2009)

sorry for posting this on the i-banking forum, but this one definitely gets the most volume.

What do you guys think about BNP Paribas in the US? I know it's well known in Europe, but do you see it gaining more prominence over the next couple of years? I have an SA offer from them for Fixed Income rates trading in either flow or exotics in NY. I'm thinking about taking this over my JPM S&T internship in Asia because I know they are strong in structured products. Am I being crazy?

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:33pm

I interviewed with BNP Paribas (London office) in the past. Total douche bags, arrogant, and utterly retarded.

I walked in for an interview without knowing that the interview was supposed to be a teleconferencing one. The teleconferencing (webcam) did not work for 1 hour, there was no coherent communication between the HR depts of London and NYC, and an IT guy stayed during my interview for like the first 15 minutes trying to fix a damn machine that wasn't needed for my teleconference interview. The IT guy told me that BNP Paribas doesn't use MS Office application but they exclusively use only Lotus. (I was interviewing for the corporate finance division).

The interviewers were total idiots. asked me retarded questions...they were just real arrogant French snobs (2 of them were French and 1 Brit).

didn't like them one bit.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:36pm

After SoGen they are the best in derivatives, hands down.
If you are doing structuring at either banks, you will be received like a king at any other banks after a few years.
But as you said they are French, and this has some drawbacks, the firm culture is a bit rigid, in other words don't count on a "fast track".

Which area are you most interested in though? If it is M&A, they are definitely not the greatest bank, if it's S&T they are one of the best (thanks to their deriv business). If you plan on working in France, great bank :) Although I would advise against it.


Remember, you will always be a salesman, no matter how fancy your title is.
- My ex girlfriend

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:37pm

"After SoGen they are the best in derivatives, hands down."

Best as in most likely to blow up? They may be the second best french bank, but not 2nd overall, no way.

In seriousness, BNP is a decent shop. I know a few guys there....they definitely let them take risk. The brand is not that well known in the US, and they have quite a french culture. You can do worse, but I'd go to most recognized US banks before i went there.

Unless you are european, or a french speaker.

But hey, what do i know?

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:39pm

For derivatives structuring and trading I heard multiple times that they are the best at what they do, and also trade the most in those products (maybe this might just be for Europe?). I had that confirmed by people from GS and CS (London again).


Remember, you will always be a salesman, no matter how fancy your title is.
- My ex girlfriend

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:41pm

thats because most kids going into ibanking arent interested enough in the profession to know banks like BNP or SocGen. i know so many kids who are all gung-ho pre-ibankers and i know more about that world than they do, and i am not going into ibanking.

most kids know ML, bear, goldman, UBS, JPM, Morgan Stanley and then they start drawing blanks.

------

"its the running joke now, we now have fair trade with china so they send us poisoned sea food and we send them fraudulent securities."

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:42pm

"

"After SoGen they are the best in derivatives, hands down."

Best as in most likely to blow up?"

 

I don't usually say I told you so....but hey, I did.

 

Jimbo

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:44pm

BNP Paribas - Anyone with experience with them? (Originally Posted: 12/18/2006)

Did a search and doesn't really seem as if many people have talked about them too much. I was wondering if anyone has experience with them? How is their presence in the US? What does their outlook look like with regards to IB. Also any info about summer program or info about full-time analysts would be great. Thanks.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:45pm

No one talks about BNP Paribas here because everyone is obsessed with Goldman, Lehman, Morgan, CS, Merrill, JPM, Deutsch Bank, Houlihan, BlackRock, KKR etc.

BNP Paribas is a very well respected name in the European circuit. Although they may not have as strong a footprint in the US, if you are interested in doing international corporate finance or structured finance, it would be worth it to explore them further.

I initially started grad school as a joint JD/MBA student. I spent a summer working at a top law firm, participated in a small healthcare M&A deal with BNP Paribas and worked with a few of their associates. Although I opted to finish just the MBA and not the joint program, I would not have had the chance to work with BNP Paribas had I not had that summer assignment. I think they're one of the top 3 banks in France in terms of IB M&A work, however their retail banking gets more widespread recognition.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:46pm

BNP is solid. It is a big client franchise with a truly global presence and a ton of money under management. All of the above should translate into better and bigger deals in the future.

They have a much stronger presence in Europe than in the U.S., just like aadpepsi said, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, i think that this is a plus just because you might want to be a part of the firm that is on the attack and with the right momentum can rise to the top very quickly.

additionally, if you want to be surrounded by internationally oriented people that speak more than one language this is a good place to be.

they have a strong syndication group and their structured finance team has been closing solid deals.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:48pm

I used to work there, and let me say you should avoid this place if you can. Maybe one day BNP will recognize its potential, but I don't see that happening anytime soon. As long as the people at the top are french it'll never happen. They are content with being a predominately retail shop with a small i-bank attached. They don't see the need to become a bigger and better i-bank and they certainly won't pay to make it happen. Compare their progress in the last 5 years to barclay's and you'll see what i mean. It's a good place to go if you want something safe and secure, but not if you think you're good enough to compete with the rest of the street.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:49pm

Can't say I was impressed with BNP. I was invited to this dinner for women from LSE--luckily being a French bank, the food was amazing and there was champagne all night :
It was all women from the firm, and they all were asking me why didn't I speak French fluently and why didn't I study finance. Which is really annoying, given that I was invited to the dinner after submitting my application, which said that I neither spoke French nor studied finance. They also kept mentioning that 1/3 of the London employees were French. Myself and a few others got pissed off as the night progessed. They either have no training budget, or HR has no idea how to make people actually want to work for that firm. Also, their office in London is in Marylebone--in the West End, way way way far away from the City and Canary Wharf. It's like working for UBS in Stamford, except for a less prestigious bank.

Anyway, I withdrew my app and took an offer with another bank.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:50pm

Don't know about deal flow etc., but I have a friend in capital markets there and he loves it. He says the people are great and his hours are very good (usually out by 7:30pm). He also says they have some really hot french girls haha.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:52pm

BNP PARIBAS Capital Markets (Originally Posted: 02/09/2011)

I have an interview coming up and am having trouble answering the question, WHY BNP over any other bank? I know there have been similar posts, but I wanted to know if anyone could give me a more direct answer. Your help is much appreciated.
Thanks!

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:53pm

You could say that it's the largest global banking group in the world, and that's what attracted you. Find something they do that others don't, and that's your answer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BNP_Paribas

read up, and let the BS flow......

Get busy living
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:54pm

I'm not sure why the answer - hey man, I need a job - just doesn't tickle these people. Like most of us have 20 options......

Get busy living
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:57pm

BNP Paribas - Interview coming up with this firm (Originally Posted: 02/05/2012)

Hey guys,

I have an interview coming up with BNP Paribas for summer analyst position in banking. Can anyone provide any color and insight on BNP in the US? Obviously they are very strong in Europe and more of a middle market player in the US, but does anyone know more specifically what types of deals they work on here or what their top groups are? Also, if anyone has been through the process and has any specifics that would be much appreciated. Thanks.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:58pm

Hey,
Just some basic insight on BNP Paribas in the US: traditionally strong in fixed income, with a growing equities business. They also have a structured finance business, and smaller advisory activities (M&A, ECM...).

See below links for recent interviews on Closing Bell of the CEO for North America, the co-heads of Fixed Income and the Head of Equities & Commodity Derivatives.

http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000067462
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000067865
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000068150

Hope this helps somewhat.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 4:59pm

BNP Paribas - How is the bank viewed? (Originally Posted: 10/12/2010)

I know it's European Bank. I've been checking out their website, it has lot of crap, and not much useful information. Does anyone with any knowledge of the bank care to comment?? How is the bank viewed? It's strengths?

 
  • Anonymous Monkey's picture
  • Anonymous Monkey
  • Rank: Chimp
Apr 3, 2014 - 5:00pm

BNP is one(if not the) most globally respected bank. It's the biggest in terms of balance sheet. It's not too well known in the states, but it can throw that balance sheet around and get in a lot of deals.

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 5:01pm

Girl I dated had a friend there and the only thing I ever got from him about it was that there seemed to be a bit of a ceiling for non-french speaking/non-french employees. Something to consider

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 5:03pm

Interned there last summer

Not very good in IBD, BUT as said above they have huge balance sheet to win deals. I think it is top5 M&A EMEA, top10 M&A worldwide currently (on all the major mega deals in the past few months)

S&T very strong, especially in fixed income, equity derivatives

 
Apr 3, 2014 - 5:04pm

I know a guy there in interest rate derivatives who made it sound like the US IBD division (Non S&T) is practically non existent.

fdba Emory Blaine and BBA or otherwise trying to find the perfect pseudonym.
 
Apr 3, 2014 - 5:05pm

I interned over there in Equity Research in an emerging market in Asia (think Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam). People were really nice and helpful. They really made me feel like a part of the team.

Don't know how it goes in the West though.

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