In Your Opinion, What Is The Best Way Of Becoming An Investment Banker?

Nutter's picture
Rank: Chimp | 5

The title says it all really. I have aspirations to become an investment banker. I have read a lot of conflicting sources about people saying that the best way to become an investment banker is right after an MBA where you usually get hired as an associate but others say that this is not the case and employers value work experience more than MBA; so joining as an analyst after completing a degree. So what is the best route of going about becoming a *successful * investment banker?

Also, another thing how valuable is work experience against high grades/degree honours?

Thanks

Comments (223)

Apr 22, 2017

I would watch American Psycho and buy a rolex submariner

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Jun 21, 2017

.

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Apr 23, 2017

How many BB IB spots do you think there are?

Best Response
Apr 24, 2017

Then perhaps "people from colleges in [your] area" aren't very good at networking or are boring people or aren't meant to work in this business. You can take solid advice from a guy who has been through what you're going through and made it to greener pastures or you can keep regurgitating info you've read online and treating it as the gospel.

Side note, I'm a little curious as to what makes you, a student still in undergrad, think you know more about the process of securing a job in investment banking than I, or others, who actually have secured a job in this sector? Maybe you know something that I don't...

Edit: not sure why this post is getting MS, I guess we're trying to encourage students without jobs to advise other students without jobs on how to get a job?

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Apr 24, 2017

I had about a 3.0 overall GPA - did awesome in my major courses but I sucked butt at the first and second-year core classes (biology, etc.). I'm not an idiot - I worked a lot for a college student and then had some personal issues that affected my classes as well. I'd agree 100% with @GreenspanAndHam. I will say the hardest part of getting into investment banking is just getting in front of someone, which is why networking is so important. If you don't network and instead only apply online - then yeah, you might only get a call if you went to Harvard, had a 4.0, etc. If you can get in front of someone, then you just need to be able to show your interest and why you are qualified, all while being a normal person. The problem with college kids is that most of them are overwhelmingly socially awkward in a formal environment.

How'd I make it? Met an MD, explained why I'd like to be in the industry (no cheesy reasons), talked about why I thought I was qualified, sent them some presentation/writing/model samples, and two interviews later I had a job. Switched to a new firm this past year and did the modeling/writing test, flew to meet the team, and just naturally got along with one of the partners. They could've easily wrote me off because I came from a much smaller firm (and side note: we did an impressive job on closing a number of sizable deals for a tiny boutique), but they knew not only that I had some great experience and a lot of responsibilities at the last firm, but that I am personable, easy going, blah blah blah. Investment banking is a relationship game in the end - yeah, it helps to be smart, but the people with the relationships are going to win the deals in the end. With that said, get out and network and work on communication. Don't be afraid to make smartass (but humorous) jokes. The list goes on.

I started writing this and don't know where it went along the way. Full disclosure: I've had a couple whiskeys.

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Apr 24, 2017

FYI I had a sub 3.0 GPA equivalent from a non-target and got an offer from a top tier bulge bracket, and have successfully lateraled since. Don't dismiss anything.

I'm sure the OP appreciates your advice but, as others have said, regurgitating content you've read on this website which has probably mostly been written by other students and not listening to people actually working in the industry is probably not the wisest of moves....

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Apr 24, 2017

People get so mad if you tell the truth. It's not hard to break into IB if you come from a target school.

Let me hear you say, this shit is bananas, B-A-N-A-N-A-S!

Apr 23, 2017

Be born into a rich family with lots of prestige.

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Jun 21, 2017

MBA> HC IB

or networking > HC IB

Jun 21, 2017

What does HC mean? Thank you

Jun 21, 2017

With your background being in Biology I have to ask, what interest you about finance and specifically about the investment banking side of finance? When you say you want to work in IB, what does that mean to you as far as job title/responsibility goes?

Jun 21, 2017

Well I am interested in pharma companies, financing them, with M&A that takes place in that industry, and with the huge risks in that industry.

Jun 21, 2017

This was a funny read

Jun 21, 2017

Not sure why but his attitude/impression reminds me a little of good old Donald. No relevent experiences, bad temper, wants a job at another industry just because, insults others for attempting to have a reasonable conversation, using vocabulary that he doesn't understand, etc.

And if history is any indication, I say Pharma Donald here is going JPM/GS HC.

Jun 21, 2017

Why? I said thank you to everyone here. I said thank you.

Jun 21, 2017

In fact I can totally see Trump posting on an anonymous forum, a priori, titled

"Want to break into POTUS, please help!"

and proceed to get mad at people for giving good advice.

Jun 21, 2017

I known of a top MM Hc group with average analyst turnover of 3 months. They migt be willing to give you a look.

Jun 21, 2017

Nice thread, very helpful.

Apr 23, 2017

Keep your lips moist.

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Jun 21, 2017

yes

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Jun 21, 2017

SAT is not high enough. 1600 or bust

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Jun 21, 2017

Thanks for the reply. I understand this; I have been working on my score and plan on taking the test again in 10th grade.

Jun 21, 2017

1) Chill out. Once you enter college, no one cares about which high school classes you took and extracurriculars you did. Have fun and enjoy high school

2) Any of the top 25 colleges should do. Look up the ranking on US News

3) People enter IB from all kinds of majors, but the typical ones are finance and economics

4) Just keep up your grades for now and enjoy high school

5) Stop going on WSO, come back after you got into a top college

Love the drive you have at such an early age. Maybe focus that on a startup? Not much you should prep now for IB, enjoy life younging

Jun 21, 2017

Target elementary schools coming soon.

But as far as the questions you asked, I will give a few answers you're looking for.

  1. SAT score needs to be almost perfect
  2. GPA needs to be VERY high
  3. Take as many AP's as you can in high school
  4. Classes are not necessary that important in high school. However, I would not take classes that you believe will harm your GPA. If you do not have an interest in physics, don't take AP physics.
  5. Varsity athletics, business and finance clubs, or student council are all great extra circulars.
  6. IB is becoming increasingly competitve even at the top schools. However, Harvard, Princeton, or Wharton would be the top 3 I would set my sights on.
  7. Study SAT subject tests
  8. Lastly, your in high school. Don't overwork yourself to death you will be burned out by college. Go to football games, dances, parties, etc.

Best of luck!

Jun 21, 2017

Also, look for a way to make yourself stand out against other applicants. Starting a non-profit or a startup of something that interests you will show drive and ambition in college essays.

Jun 21, 2017

So - take a deep breath. Your interest may change - that being said make sure that you take your applications to colleges seriously - the listed schools are good. In my experience Standford works too as well as Columbia, Darthmouth, Wharton etc.

Being smart is not what banking is about - its being a hard worker so don't worry there.

If you're going to the Ivy Leagues major doesn't matter a ton tbh - just make it relevant to business.

Start reading the markets to see if you really have a passion for this and make sure that you have some interesting hobbies.

Good luck.

Jun 21, 2017

At your age you should be focused on two things: getting into a great school and keeping an open mind about what you want to do with your life. That said, aiming for IB is a great goal to have, because you'll develop a very competitive profile that will make you attractive for all sorts of other opportunities. Just stay open to what's out there - it's too early for tunnel vision.

There are very few high school achievements, other than maybe SAT score (or starting a business or curing cancer or some other wunderkind craziness) that a potential employer will care about. For the most part, your success in HS gets distilled into one line on your resume: the name of your school. And a 1560 is plenty good enough for consideration at the best schools and the top investment banks. Keep working on your grades and extracurriculars and you'll get there.

Apr 23, 2017

I'm from the UK and recently had a networking coffee with a pretty exec guy at a PE firm. He gave me a whole route to take. He advised going into companies like KPMG, PwC, Deloitte etc. do the Deals/Advisory insight and summer opportunities, work in one of said companies for a couple years, apply to a BB for M&A (If not straight into BB, go to a boutique for even more experience and more names on your resume/CV). Then after years of IB go into PE. Seems like a clear pathway. Other than that, do a shed ton of teamwork stuff like sports teams, Investment or finance societies etc. Be a well rounded individual.

Hope this helps in someway.

Apr 24, 2017

I've met several MDs who came into the industry laterally, and it seems like a pretty smart idea - skip the analyst years while getting a relevant perspective on transactions.

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Jun 21, 2017
Jun 21, 2017

That's a very open-ended question, but yes networking does help. I wouldn't say its too difficult per se, but it is more competitive than most fields so thats where you need to stand out and be better than the competition.

You're asking a pretty open-ended question as to how to break into IB. Just do a quick google search and it'll lead you to some great sites like Mergers and Inquisitions and BIWS. Those are much more comprehensive and in-depth than what I can provide

Jun 21, 2017

if only there were resources out there answering this very question.. to me, it's one of those "if you have to ask" things...

try to be resourceful

Jun 21, 2017

I would typically use a crowbar, but that's less effective at some midtown office buildings. If you want a more James Bond approach, consider dating an admin, and then swiping his/her access card.

Jun 21, 2017

Big 4 internships -> tax lawyer -> M&A/ECM lawyer -> in-house IBD lawyer -> buy-side IBD merchant banking -> taking it easy in risk management in my middle age

Jun 21, 2017

delete

Apr 24, 2017

If you don't go to a target school, it better be because you have a damn good and successful family and only needed to save a couple of bucks by going to state on somewhere that offered you a great scholarship package, or due to other reasons out of your control. If your family is not very successful, better to focus on getting an MBA or it's target or bust.

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Apr 24, 2017

Uhhh what? I almost didn't bother responding but this is so wrong I had to. You can become an investment banker by coming from a target school, non-target school, MBA, etc. Which is the easiest? A target school will absolutely be an easier process because of on-campus recruiting, alumni presence, and ivy league prestige. That being said, if it was "target or bust" then I guess my friends or I from my school did the impossible since we came from a non-target. And I guess all the alumni I know from my school and similar schools also did the impossible.

Being from a target will get you an interview but that by no means guarantees you the job. I came from a non-target and the process was very difficult relative to the ivy leaguers I was up against but if anything they were impressed by all the obstacles I had to overcome to be in front of them at the interview. And I sure as hell wasn't going to take this opportunity for granted. It is completely feasible to become an investment banker from a non-target. Just focus on grades, EC, and networking and you will have a shot.

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Apr 24, 2017

Bruhhh, do you even read?

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Apr 24, 2017

My post was not saying whether you can or cannot break in from a nontarget. I'm using hyperbole to say that you have a higher chance breaking in if you come from a successful family of professionals with the exception that you go to a target. I'm joking but I honestly I've seen more kids from successful families with success than I have those without, same grades and ec, coming from my nontarget. You sound like a kid so just bounce bro.

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Jun 21, 2017

Hey [email protected] I think those things are important. But the technical knowledge is a good problem to have: you don't need it until you land some interviews first. Being a lateral is something I don't know much about, but I can give you my opinion:

Network.

It's your bread and butter. And it's the only way you'll have a strong fighting chance of breaking in. Find alumni from your school that are in NYC at the banks/boutiques. If you don't have an alumni site, put your school name and bank names into facebook and linkedin and see what comes out. Get in touch with these people. Even if it's tough to lateral in this market, you want those connections so when things turn up, you're ready to go.

I imagine that's a good place as any to start your search.

Jun 21, 2017

It's not really lateraling as I have NO IBD experience and have never worked in banking.

Also my undergrad is not well known out of the area it's in and if people do recognize it it's because of its athletic programs. I'd be very surprised if there are ANY alum working on the street. What do I do if I can't find alums in banking?

Jun 21, 2017

[email protected] -- I'd personally seek other career alternatives. I'm not sure how risk adverse you are, but it is extremely possible that you'll spend the next 2-4 years of your life trying to prepare for a job you'll likely never get. If you're okay with this, by all means go down the path of self-prep and get your MBA. The problem is, seeing Cum Laude at a state school, quitting after a year in law school, and no relevant work experience puts you in the "no chance" bucket. You can try to get in via networking, but unless you have a high profile person in your family, you're likely going to hit a brick wall.

Sorry for the large dose of pessimism, but I truly believe this is the best advice I can give.

Jun 21, 2017
CompBanker:

[email protected] -- I'd personally seek other career alternatives. I'm not sure how risk adverse you are, but it is extremely possible that you'll spend the next 2-4 years of your life trying to prepare for a job you'll likely never get. If you're okay with this, by all means go down the path of self-prep and get your MBA. The problem is, seeing Cum Laude at a state school, quitting after a year in law school, and no relevant work experience puts you in the "no chance" bucket. You can try to get in via networking, but unless you have a high profile person in your family, you're likely going to hit a brick wall.

Sorry for the large dose of pessimism, but I truly believe this is the best advice I can give.

Thanks for the reply. This is pretty much what I thought. Any ideas on alternative careers? I do enjoy finance and liked the Asset Management stuff I was doing before I gave law school a try.

Jun 21, 2017

Asset Management is certainly a viable career choice. Life is certainly not about maximizing your wealth. If you enjoy what you do and can make enough to support your desired lifestyle, you shouldn't need much more to be happy. Note, by desired lifestyle I do not mean "dream life," I mean a lifestyle you'd be comfortable and content with.

~~~~~~~~~~~
CompBanker

Apr 24, 2017

Drink the blood of Lloyd Blankfein

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Apr 26, 2017

What if he has AIDS?

Jun 21, 2017

Network with some Columbia grads who are already on the street. I'm sure there are more than a couple UIUC grads also.

Jun 21, 2017

Have you read through the articles on Mergers & Inquisitions? If you have any friends or any warm contacts (i.e. school alumni) in investment banking I'd highly recommend reaching out to them for a quick phone call or coffee chat to learn more about their experiences.

I know this advice is a bit generic, but it really does work. More people have received offers this way than you may think. Good luck!

Welcome to the jungle.

Jun 21, 2017

netowkrings youre only way now

Jun 21, 2017

I'm in a pretty similar situation to you. It sucks. It seems like we were passed over and they only consider 2011 grads now

Jun 21, 2017

I was a May 2009 grad and I feel your pain . I worked for a year as a prop trader, that was all I could get, then went back to school to get a Master of Finance primarily to get back on the school recruiting track. However, you are rather fortunate since you are currently working for a large bank. Find someone(MD) who works in a division that you are interested in and network your way to a job. Work hard, build your resume then bounce when the opportunity presents itself. Worse case, grind it out a little while longer. Get an MBA and enter a BB as an associate.

Jun 21, 2017

What vertical are you in?

Jun 21, 2017

If you're patient, there is also the accounting route. Go try to join a big 4 with their Transaction Services, and if you get a CPA after 2 years, you could make the job to investment banking.

Jun 21, 2017

I'm in the same situation, literally couldnt have been more spot on.

My plan is to look for any finance internship (wealth management, corporate finance, etc) and study for the CFA level 1. Curious as to what others have to say.

Jun 21, 2017

You're thinking about it the right way. The two best things you can do are (1) focus on raising your GPA (2) securing a good internship for the spring + summer

If you are going to pursue a spring internship though, make sure it doesn't compromise your grades.

As you can probably guess, networking extensively throughout spring/summer is going to be your best shot here. If you end up getting a PE internship and doing a good job, hopefully they will have some contacts they'd be willing to refer you to as well.

I wouldn't consider pushing graduation unless you're really coming up empty on FT recruiting and you're dead set on BBs, and even then it's no guarantee. If you are as committed to breaking in as you suggest, I'd try to be open minded about opportunities at non-BBs as well. They can still offer great experiences and you could always try lateraling to a larger firm once you start full time anyways.

Jun 21, 2017

You are extremely committed yet started the process too late?

Other kids are hungrier it seems, son!

Jun 21, 2017

I would say you have a small chance of getting an offer within IBD without networking. However, networking will increase your odds dramatically so try and find some time to do so because it will pay off. Just make sure you network the right way.

And yes, capital markets (Like DCM) are probably going to be easier to get an offer from than on a S&T desk. However, all the positions you listed don't have a major difference in terms of difficulty between them.

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Jun 21, 2017

You need to:
1) demonstrate knowledge
2) ur gpa isn't gonna do u any favors, you need to sell the hell out of your character and personality

Jun 21, 2017

The above posters don't really know what they're talking about. I'm currently a junior at one of the above schools, and I was in a similar position as you last summer (boutique IB instead of consulting). I did zero networking until about November, and then my 'networking' consisted solely of emails and phone calls (no city visits, no coffee chats with alums). I ended up getting interviews and offers from the majority of BBs and EBs. Keep in mind, too, that I have a much easier major than you, and have a lower GPA than you do. Here's my point - with a double major in Econ/Applied math and a 3.7 at Yale, you're going to land interviews pretty much everywhere. Don't worry about the summer. Just make sure you go to networking events when banks come to campus, and in November/December, reach out to analysts/associates that are alums at the various banks via email and ask for brief phone conversations. That, combined with your academic record, will get you interviews at 99% of banks. 'Hard' networking at HYP is only necessary if you're deficient in some area (experience, grades, etc). You're clearly not, so I wouldn't stress about this too much. Good luck, and PM me if you have any questions.

Edit: didn't see oasis's comment until after I posted mine. He/she is spot on.

dollas

Jun 21, 2017

^ These kids must still be in high school

With that profile, you are all but guaranteed on-campus interviews at most if not all of the top banks. Networking is not necessary at all.

Jun 21, 2017

Rising junior? In that case, you're fine. More than fine; you're in great shape. Those first posters are either trolls, or deeply confused. You'll get interviews almost everywhere next year. If you want a more detailed discussion, PM me.

Jun 21, 2017

If you're at HYP you are not 'breaking in' hahaha

'Before you enter... be willing to pay the price'

Jun 21, 2017

dont waste time networking for IBD - youre a top candidate and youll get interviews everywhere (and offers too, if you dont suck). that said i would focus your time and efforts to network for analyst positions with top HFs and MF PE shops since youll have access to them.

Jun 21, 2017
ricottacheese:

dont waste time networking for IBD - youre a top candidate and youll get interviews everywhere (and offers too, if you dont suck). that said i would focus your time and efforts to network for analyst positions with top HFs and MF PE shops since youll have access to them.

Is this for real?
Networking is about much more than just getting a job.
No matter how great your grades are, culture, group placement and overall fit still very much come into play.

Array

Jun 21, 2017

I don't think you'll have any trouble getting offers with that profile unless you are are really annoying and have zero social/interviewing skills.

Jun 21, 2017

You're never guaranteed any offers, but I'd be surprised if a single bank denied you a first round interview

Jun 21, 2017

The people telling you not to network are giving you terrible advice. Yes, you will likely have your choice of interviews come next winter. However, the recruiting process is such a crap shoot that you can never be too careful. Further, it will help to have relationships in top groups for selection day.

Jun 21, 2017

Non-target students oversimplify the top target campus recruiting process. Even with a 3.7 at HYP you are not guaranteed interviews. Network with people now, before your internship starts, and then follow up with them during the fall semester.

I have a close friend - double quantitative major at HYP with a 3.9 GPA, ended up landing an offer with a top hedge fund manager but got it through networking and not OCR. Did not get a single offer through OCR (and he's a really cool guy so that's not the reason). Credit Suisse told him that they preferred to hire athletes over traditional candidates.

I'm at a target school, have a good GPA with a bunch of work experience and ended up having to network pretty intensely to land my current summer offer. I'm a sophomore, but it was still difficult and OCR did not help me at all.

You can't go wrong if you network - it's highly advised that you do so. You'll certainly be up against people who have networked, so maximizing your competitive edge can't hurt.

Jun 21, 2017

Berkeley will give you more options for recruiting, but UCLA would be fine as well. You should ultimately go where you believe you will have the best college experience because both are good schools.

That said, if the primary driver of your decision is whether or not you can get into Haas, I'd go to Berkeley. If you want to do banking, you will need top grades, and that should correlate with your ability to get into the b-school.

Jun 21, 2017

Hi Arian, I think my advice would be pretty similar from the monkey above.

Echoing his words, both schools are good, and if you are an excellent student, it shouldn't make a large difference at the end of the day.

I think it really comes down to you at this point; if you like UCLA that much more over Berkeley, going to Berkeley would probably make you slightly miserable if you began to reminisce the choice you made. However, If your sole criteria is getting a better shot at a top job, regardless of your well-being, then go for Berkeley.

In addition, I'd just like to remind you not to fear the fact that you might get rejected from the Haas programme; work hard, commit to it, and nothing will stop you from achieving what you want.

"Suffer today and live the rest of your life as a champion!"

Jun 21, 2017

I'm not sure if you can do this, but could you go to UCLA for your first two years and THEN try to get into Haas as a transfer student? If so, it kind of takes all of the risk out of it. Either you get into Haas or you just stay at UCLA.

Also, what kind of money are we talking here? Any scholarships?

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Jun 21, 2017

Bump

Jun 21, 2017

You sure it isn't a research associate position? Thus same as analyst. Regardless, congrats. Keep us updated.

Jun 21, 2017

Yeah, sure am. That was actually my first question on the phone interview, along with how many people they'd be taking. And thanks I appreciate it

Jun 21, 2017

Best of luck. My only advice would be to actually practice building out models from scratch. It will give you a wholly different understanding of how things work than reading from a book/interview guide.

Jun 21, 2017

Interesting. That would be a very impressive move to jump into an associate position with that much experience. Be ready to stave off underlying resentment from analysts with more years of IBD experience, but that's definitely not a reason to be hesitant to make this jump. I don't mean for my tone to be pessimistic, but it's just surprising that they'd try and bring you on as an associate vs an analyst simply because of the years of experience. I say this because in a group with flat structure there is very little difference between experienced analyst and associate in terms of roles and responsibilities.

I would think that this could almost be a selling point on your behalf when you're pitted up against MBAs. Lower cost (only marginally) for equal, if not better, domain knowledge and aptitude for the job. Obviously the objective isn't to negotiate yourself into a lower paying position than possible, but from a competitive standpoint it can be helpful to make them realize the marginal difference in cost vs. performance if they're trying to compare you to someone with a nice MBA on their res who will command higher comp.

As a third year analyst, I've face similar situations where they are interviewing for a sr. analyst/associate (although you've made it clear their looking for an associate). The way I played it was to emphasize why this was the right job for me, etc, but mention that my interest in the position was based on the quality of the opportunity, the experience, and the direction I wanted to take my career with seniority only being a secondary consideration.

Either way, congratulations and best of luck with this impressive move. You must be a real stud in interviews.

Jun 21, 2017

Best of luck! Let us know!

Jun 21, 2017

Try to get a SA spot. You can cold call/email like crazy for that which will help. Numbers are your friend here. Since you don't have quality (non-target) you have to go with quantity.

After you get a SA spot, then you should be good to go.

You can also do the same thing but look for a 1st year analyst position as well. Sure the big banks will probably look over you, but if you can get in contact with a smaller firm they might give you a chance.

Jun 21, 2017

Given your concentration in Risk, I'd be curious to see @"SSits" opinion on what you can do.

Jun 21, 2017

I would try networking with any local IBs including the MM, not just BBs. BBs like prestige and it's hard to get unless you come from a target school and/or have a BB SA experience.
And from what you said, it sounds like you're in the mid-west (correct me if I'm wrong, since I had a similar situation graduation from a mid-west state school) Consider relocating to NYC where there are more job and networking opportunities.

What we do in life echoes in eternity - Maximus Decimus Meridius

Jun 21, 2017

I'll probably do the same thing. Can you give us some insights on how to find local IBs and boutique/MM firms? Some examples would be greatly appreciated.

I'm in NJ just in case you're wondering.

Jun 21, 2017

Thanks! I am actually from NJ as well, but I went to school in VA. I have an interview for an internship at Societe Generale coming up...have any of you heard anything about them? Culture/Reputation on the street?

Also, any advice for this interview or Ibanking analyst interviews in general would be appreciated.

Jun 21, 2017

thanks! I am starting a job in capital markets operations at a major bank. Is it easy to move accross departments from an operations position?

Jun 21, 2017

First, you are going to want to clarify whether you would like to work on the sell side for a few years or pursue a career in investment banking. The skills that you will need to get started in investment banking are different than those that you will need to have a long and successful career in investment banking. The role in investment banking transforms from one that is research, financial modeling & valuation based into one focused on origination and facilitating the M&A process. M&A (Mergers & Acquisitions) is the core product of investment banking, and the other products, advisory & capital-raising, simply support this. In short, WSO, WSP, and IBI are good for getting the financial modeling & valuation side of things, but if you are interested in reaching VP level and above I would check out IBU which focuses on M&A origination, coverage, mandate/target matching and deal structuring.

Best,
Michael Herlache MBA
VP, M&A

Jun 21, 2017

mba or ice cold networking

Jun 21, 2017

Network, Network, Network and Network some more. Than after that when you're done networking you should call 10 more people and try to expand your network.

People like it when you reach out for advice about how to make the transition. You want to get to the point where you are tired of hearing the same story from a bunch of bankers. Thats when you have networked enough and are making progress.

Jun 21, 2017

I would advise your mother to go to the coat closet and grab a hanger...

Jun 21, 2017

Come on buddy, you have to do better than that:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=most+prestigious+preschool+fe...

Jun 21, 2017

Definitely B - why on earth would you go to med school if you want to do IB?

Jun 21, 2017

Because I actually do have a passion for med and I figured, hey if I have to do a first degree anyway, why not do it in something I love? And it would also provide a stable plan B that I would be perfectly content with in case of anything.

Jun 21, 2017

Goodluck

Jun 21, 2017

Thank you

Jun 21, 2017

Where is 'home country' ?

Med school will make you look smart but confused/lacking direction or 'oomph' for what you want to do - you'd have to have stellar connections to land IB gigs without a strong b school. B is looking better.

Jun 21, 2017

Home country is Jamaica. The intention would be to go to a strong b school if I do take route A, but I know that it's risky. Would having a degree in medicine make me look confused? I thought that your major didn't matter at all.

Jun 21, 2017

My home country is Jamaica. Would med school really make me look confused? I thought that major didn't matter for IB.

Jun 21, 2017

@"Revul" Apparently I can't edit comments, but yea, if I do decide on taking route A, I would definitely try to get into a top B school.

Jun 21, 2017

Apply online and hope for the best.

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Jun 21, 2017

Please don't feed the troll, people. Let this post be the last of the thread.

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Jun 21, 2017

I'm serious guys.... I really am very interested and concerned about business and finance and want to do whatever it takes to get to Wall Street New York and be the best of the best, PLEASEEE help me wso I want to be an investment banker so so bad.

Bump

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Jun 21, 2017

Trololol hohoho

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Jun 21, 2017

It's so sad that I can't tell if this is some troll post by a veteran WSO monkey or one of the hundreds of anxious high school dumbasses that now populate this forum.

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Jun 21, 2017

OP, I wrote a song for you.

I wanna be the very best,
Like no one ever was.
To pitch them is my real test,
To close them is my cause.
I will travel across the land,
Searching far and wide.
Each client to understand
The all-nighters that are inside
Investment banking, (gotta pitch them all) its you and me
I know its my destiny
Investment banking, oh, you're my best friend
In a bank account that you must fill
Investment banking, (gotta pitch them all) a heart so true
Our 10th Red Bull will pull us through
You teach me and I'll teach you
(In-vestment-banking) Gotta pitch 'em all
Every challenge along the way
With courage I will face
I will grind every day
To claim my rightful place
Come with me, the time is right
There's no better team
Arm in arm we'll win the mandate
It's always been our dream
Investment banking!
(Gotta pitch 'em all)
It's you and me
I know it's my destiny
Investment banking!
Oh, you're my best friend,
In a mandate we must win.
Investment banking!
A heart so true.
Our 10th Red Bull will pull us through.
You teach me and I'll teach you.
Investment banking!
(Gotta pitch 'em all)x5
Investment banking!
It's you and me
I know it's my destiny
Investment banking!
Oh, you're my best friend,
In a mandate we must win.
Investment banking!
A heart so true.
Our 10th Red Bull will pull us through.
You teach me and I'll teach you.
INVESTMENT BANKING!
Gotta pitch'em all!!
Gotta pitch'em all!!
INVESTMENT BANKING!!!

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Jun 21, 2017

Not sure about Queens US placement, but from what my friends at Ivey say (and a quick LinkedIn search) they send a handful of students down south every year. That being said, #2 would probably be your best bet if you got in to a top school (e.g. H/S/W).

Also what's the reason for your late entry? If it's you "discovering yourself" you might get dinged. If it's something like military service it could really help you.

Jun 21, 2017

I'm sure I could come up with a good enough story. But basically it was due to some personal issues which I have gotten documented and feeling out a different program at my school. If that isn't a good enough reason I'm sure I could conjure up some BS that will sound good enough.

Anyone else have thoughts on this situation?

Jun 21, 2017

Do you have an aversion to working in Toronto? I would think the recruiting would be far better there for the 2 Canadian school you listed.

Personally, I think there are many positive to working in IB outside of NYC. I understand that NYC has many more options for lateraling and PE exits etc, but it also has a ridiculous COL and the lifestyle is pretty brutal.

Just my thoughts

Jun 21, 2017

Not too familiar with Canadian IB which may sound odd since I live here lol. If the comp and overall structure per se is similar, then I would definitely be open to it

Jun 21, 2017

If you want to go to the US transfer to a top university in the states. If you cannot, go to Ivey or Queens. Once there you can try to get into Canadian banks. The only time your age will get mentioned in interviews and such is if you bring it up. People will just view you as a 2nd year, 3rd year etc.

Jun 21, 2017

The stereotypical path: 3.7+ GPA in finance at a target school, finance-related internship sophomore year, Summer Analyst banking internship junior year, return offer for full time at the end of your junior summer

Jun 21, 2017

As above, or if in the UK, the typical path is top A-level grades in school usually AAA and above, followed by a 2:1 at a target university or less often but still doable, with a bit of extra networking and ECs, at a semi-target university (you also have the occasional superstar candidate from a non-target university). The usual steps, after securing your place at university, are to ideally complete a one week spring week in your first year of university during your easter break, followed by a summer internship in your second year and then hopefully a return FT offer for the following year after graduation.

Jun 21, 2017

Thanks for quick responses!
As for resumes, other than work experience what makes a candidate more attractive for recruitment?

Jun 21, 2017

Other than work experience, top grades and a top university, banks will most likely look for something to help differentiate candidates. Such as spoken languages, ECs like finance societies (this shows an interest in the industry and additionally if you're interested in S&T you can start your own trading portfolio), music achievements (shows dedication and commitment to play an instrument at high grade), taking part in volunteer work (not boring ones though), and other things which demonstrate key competencies such as leadership and teamwork skills e.g. playing sport or joining the university's football team etc..

Also, by making the most of any networking events banks host and meeting with employees and actually sending those follow up emails and making the effort to arrange a time to meet up again for a drink or a phone call. This although mostly leads to nothing, can occasionally (if you do it well and they like you) lead to recommendations which can help you land that first round interview.

Hope this helps.

    • 1
Jun 21, 2017

Pull chicks in high school -> Average state college -> Join god tier frat -> Pull chicks with frat brahs -> Xanax -> 2.5 GPA -> Waltz into Goldman Sachs interview some time during senior year -> "I'm here for the money pussies" -> Greatness

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Jun 21, 2017

yes you are right...and yes that was obvious.

But for some people that isn't an option: A) have to take summer classes to graduate on time b) Grades not up to par junior year c) for people not close to NYC...picking up and moving for 2 months is very hard.

  • its just as hard to get an internship in IB from what people said...because like you mentioned banks want to hire people from their intern class...so they want to get the best of the best
Jun 21, 2017

oh and interns actually do get paid, the pay is prorated. I think my friend made something like 10k during his internship.

Jun 21, 2017

yeah, this past summer I made 4,000 a month pre tax + 2,000 end of summer "merit bonus". So, for an intern after witholding and other taxes, each paycheck every two weeks is around 1,500...sure as hell beats my job two summers ago making 8.50/hr in a warehouse doing crap work from 10-4 every day (amounted to not so much spending cash)

Jun 21, 2017

newsflash, rosshill: it's actually a bit harder to get a summer analyst IB job than FT

Jun 21, 2017

Yeah, I think so too. I think it would be harder to land a summer job than an actual full-time position.

Jun 21, 2017

Yeah...don't the BBs usually hire almost all of their summer interns unless you really fucked up? I heard that at ML if they hire 95% of their interns fulltime they consider it a recruiting failure.

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

Jun 21, 2017

don't you mean don't

Jun 21, 2017

probably easier to get hired during the summer - you're cheaper labour and gives the company a chance to "interview" you for 3 months. also, since most banks hire a large percentage of the summer crew to stay on full-time after graduation, less spots are open during fall recruiting.

Jun 21, 2017

Most banks hire almost the entire summer intern class, unless you really do a bad job. Even if you hate the group/bank, it's still a good idea to suck it up and get a full time offer, and then use that as leverage to get offers from better banks during the fall recruiting season.

Jun 21, 2017
JackDole1029:

I have a friend here at Dartmouth who enlisted in the Air Force when he was a sophomore in high school (17) in the delayed entry program. The kid went to basic training that summer and job training the following summer. His six year committment will end when he graduates in may. he got to put on his resume that he was in the air force reserve for six years. He got an interview with every bank he applied to and got an offer with every bank he interview with. he applied to 5 banks. he had a 3.3 GPA.

He said his interviewers were respectful and gave him low ball questions. he said it really seperated him from the pack. Moreover he said he could have got in with a 3.0. That was the only EC activity he had on his resume.

I'm not surprised. I would have given him home field advantage too.

Jun 21, 2017

Being in the army or the Air Force takes enormous dedication. It is not some other activity that you do simply because you are "passionate" about it. People join the Air Force and the Army to serve their country.

The sacrifice of putting your life on the line day in and day out takes a lot more dedication and sacrifice than just being an athlete or a serial club joiner.

I'm not surprised at all.

Jun 21, 2017
JambaMan:

Being in the army or the Air Force takes enormous dedication. It is not some other activity that you do simply because you are "passionate" about it. People join the Air Force and the Army to serve their country.

The sacrifice of putting your life on the line day in and day out takes a lot more dedication and sacrifice than just being an athlete or a serial club joiner.

I'm not surprised at all.

I completely agree with you.

Jun 21, 2017

I know an associate that was an officer in a branch of the military and he is worthless (and lazy above all). Because of that, I will probably never give military personnel a bigger advantage over anyone else.

Jun 21, 2017
GameTheory:

I know an associate that was an officer in a branch of the military and he is worthless (and lazy above all). Because of that, I will probably never give military personnel a bigger advantage over anyone else.

Would your associate be the exception or the norm for military types in ibanking because it does require immense dedication to be in the military for 6 years?

Jun 21, 2017

My point is that never to assume that someone is dedicated and/or hardworking without verifying for yourself.

Before I started banking I met a VP in an airport terminal who was a captain in the army - he said banking was harder physically and mentally than boot camp and all his years in the service. I personally don't believe it, but he looked pretty miserable.

Jun 21, 2017

You'll always have bad seeds. I know a few who were in the Marine Corps. One got out as a Lance Corporal; you need to be a scumbag to get discharged as an E3 or below.

Jun 21, 2017

at my b-school (top 10) all the military guys got banking offers. it is a surefire way to get a banking job, but like other posters have said these fellows put their lives on the line (i.e. active duty in iraq).

Jun 21, 2017

cylack, Duke MBA?

Jun 21, 2017

Answer this, and the world will be your oyster.

Jun 21, 2017

A strong grasp of the English language couldn't hurt.

Jun 21, 2017

Good gpa. Sociable. Good networking skills.

Jun 21, 2017
Comment

If the glove don't fit, you must acquit!

Jun 21, 2017
Jun 21, 2017
Comment

If the glove don't fit, you must acquit!

Jun 21, 2017