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Thank You Email After Interview

econ's picture
Rank: Neanderthal | 2,649

How long after an interview should you send the thank you email? Does anybody have a good template? I'm not looking to copy-and-paste the template, I just want to see what a good thank you email looks like.

How Soon Should I Send My Thank You Note?

Your email should be sent within 24 hours. If you are interviewing in a summer analyst - super day setting, decisions are often made about candidates at the end of the day. With this in mind, sending your email before the end of the day is beneficial if you keep it simple and make sure that it is error free.

Sooner is usually better than later in these scenarios as you want the interviewers to know that you sent your email before they are making their decision. If looking between two different otherwise equal candidates, just the act of sending a thank you email could set you apart in that scenario.

Check out another thread about After Interview Emails to learn more.

Thank You Email Template

Your email should reiterate your interest in the firm as well as touch on a specific point that came up in the interview. This demonstrates that you remember the interview and put thought into the thank you note.

Hi First Name Here,

I wanted to thank you for taking time to interview me today for the Bank of America Investment Banking program. I really appreciated having the opportunity to learn about your experience in the TMT group and your experience working on the AT&T - Time Warner Deal. After hearing more about the collegial and supportive nature of the firm, I would really love to have the chance to intern with the firm this summer.

Thanks again for your time. I hope to hear from you soon.

Best,
Rory Gilmore

Check out the below video for more tips on putting together your thank you note.

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Comments (208)

Jan 27, 2011

You should send it as soon as reasonably practical. 1 week at the very latest.

Jan 27, 2011
IlliniProgrammer:

You should send it as soon as reasonably practical. 1 week at the very latest.

Is 1-3 hours later acceptable? (Assuming, of course, that it's still articulated well.)

Jan 27, 2011

Well, that would kinda strike me as OCD. Maybe if they interview you in the morning and you get back to them in the late afternoon, that would look a little more normal.

Jan 27, 2011
IlliniProgrammer:

Well, that would kinda strike me as OCD. Maybe if they interview you in the morning and you get back to them in the late afternoon, that would look a little more normal.

Okay, I just don't want to forget. At the same time, I don't want to send it too early if that's a faux pas, haha. Sorry for all the silly questions, I'm just so new at this stuff and feel totally wet behind the ears (and really want the job).

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Jan 27, 2011

Jesus. Just send a thank you letter. I really don't think they are going to read into what time you send it as much as you are.

Jan 27, 2011
Black Jack:

Jesus. Just send a thank you letter. I really don't think they are going to read into what time you send it as much as you are.

Noted.

Jan 27, 2011

Just make it quick -- even if it's crap.

Jan 27, 2011

I'm sure this is obvious... but if you make it quick, don't make it crap.

We've reconsidered two offers over the last year due to crappy thank you letters (e.g., obvious grammar and/or spelling mistakes, general sloppiness). It didn't give us the warm and fuzzies that the individuals could be trusted to email clients and/or create decks not chock full of errors.

    • 1
Jan 27, 2011

This is not like waiting to text a girl after a date. As they mentioned, decisions are often made very shortly after so get it out ASAP. Granted, you don't need to type it up on your blackberry in the cab as you leave the office but make it a quick turnaround.

Jan 27, 2011

Thank you letters are more about the point of sending than necessarily the content. Granted don't send crap. But it is a ding between two equal candidates if you sent nothing.

Jan 27, 2011

just send it as soon as you can. probably didn't make much of a difference in any decisions, but i always tried to re-format a generic thank you email template and include 1 or 2 points that i thought were interesting or important from the interview. i could be wrong, but i don't even think most people read these things, or at least don't respond.

Jan 27, 2011

I once received an offer before sending in the thank you note...(in which case I forgot to send in the notes)...I'm under the impression that its better not to send in anything than to send in a bad one...

Jan 27, 2011

I'd send a couple of hours after the interview ended if it's going to be an email. I'm old fashioned and I say do a handwritten one (especially if they're older), but if you're going to email, give it 2-3 hours but definitely send it today.

    • 1
Jan 27, 2011

Would it be too much if I sent both? Also, how do I find out the mailbox number if I want to send hand written one? Can I just write the name and address the place that person works for?

Jan 27, 2011

Some of the information on these forums is so cringe worthy. I'm just cringing at the thought of someone actually sending an analyst or associate a hand-written thank you note for a PHONE interview (you didn't even meet them in person). Also, just be normal. Bankers aren't some different species- they're human too.

Just send them a 2-3 sentence thank you note, telling them that you appreciated them taking the time to speak with you, and that you hope to keep in touch. Don't go overboard by writing a 2-3 paragraph thank you note, because they have more important shit to do than reading a thank you note.

    • 1
Best Response
Jan 27, 2011

Multiply the minutes the banker spent on the phone with you by 8, then add 4 and divide by 6. Next subtract 20 and divide again by 5. This is the number of hours you should wait before sending your thank you email. If greater than 10, send a physical note via USPS. If greater than 20, a blow job will be your best bet. Guaranteed to result in an offer!

    • 4
Jan 27, 2011

Way overthinking it - bankers are busy, they don't give a shit about thank you notes

    • 1
Jan 27, 2011

When would it be a good time to follow up with her? Or should I just let it go? Wait for her to have the time to refer me?

Jan 27, 2011

It doesn't matter at all. I agree with @"Future_Banker_hopeful". Shit like this is so common sense. Here's your template:

"Subject line: Nice speaking with you

It was nice speaking with you today, I appreciated your insights about X and Y. Thanks for sending my information to HR. If you're ever in [town you live in], I'd love to buy you a drink. Let's stay in touch.

Best,
leabc
212-555-5555
[email protected]"

Jan 27, 2011

1) a few hours. <24 though
2/3) Depends on the thread content and freshness. Usually i interview with someone ive never emailed before, so i send them an email with the subject "Thank You" or something straightforward

Jan 27, 2011

rest of my message was cut off.
2/3) usually you interview with someone you've never emailed before. I send an email with the subject "Thank You" or something straightforward and easy on the eyes for someone who is working a lot of hours.

Jan 27, 2011

1) When do you time the emails? Is the night of the call acceptable? Is immediately after okay or too soon?
A few hours later.

2) Do you write it as a separate email or can you reply to the thread?
I like to reply to the thread so all of the back and forth/name/etc is together, but others might disagree. If there is no thread, then in the subject I'd put Thank You so the guy knows to ignore it or that it's not important.

3) Subject line?
Same subject or thank you, imo

Jan 27, 2011

I've usually done it as a reply to the email chain, but an associate who was giving me advice on a cold call replied to my email telling me to send it separately.

Jan 27, 2011

Don't overthink it. You received an offer and accepted it. Paperwork should follow within 1-2 weeks. There's an administrative team built to handle all the non-investing functions: investor relations, accounting, legal, HR, etc.

Most places tend to view these functions as cost centers (rather than looking at them as the foundational building blocks that ensure the stability of the business) and they are understaffed. Basically, while every revenue-related task gets taken care of immediately, administrative things take a second seat.

No need to sweat over a few days without hearing anything from them. I'd follow up with each of the people who interviewed you thanking them for spending the time getting to know you, sharing their experience of the firm, and giving you enough information to make a decision to take the opportunity they've provided you.

You could take it a step further and ask about what you need to brush up on, but I've never felt that was necessary because the simple fact they hired you means they believe you can get the work done. Show up on your first day with a good attitude, be early there and late to leave for the first month at least, and exercise all the classic 'first impression in a new role' tokens that are well known.

Jan 27, 2011

Hi APAE,

Thank you for your comments. They are well received and will be beneficial for me moving forward. Funny you mentioned of the wait between the acceptance of the verbal offer and receiving the written offer, exactly what I'm doing right now.

As I sense you're move knowledgeable in this area than me, may I ask of your opinion regarding an aspect of this hiring process. It's nitpicking but I'm still thinking of it.

What do you think of me, at this stage when they're drafting out the written offer, stating my preference of a minor tweak in my title. It's along the lines of a prefix like asking for "Investment Analyst" instead of "Analyst" they'll presumably give me? It's okay to mention or I should just let them to decide and not risk giving them any doubt that I'll come on board.

Thanks.

Jan 27, 2011

2. Just send a short follow up thanking them and saying you are excited to join. Don't do #3, seems necessary.

Jan 27, 2011

Do I do #2 after the verbal offer or after the formal offer, receiving and signing it?

Jan 27, 2011

Maybe not everything you read on some forum is true. it makes no difference whatsoever. your performance is what will gain you respect from your peers, not some silly wordplay on your title (btw, the analyst title is pretty standard, although some large funds can have senior / junior analysts).

Jan 27, 2011

I 100% agree with you. My point is that there are many out there, who would perceive the FX Trader to be more respected than the Execution Trader, rightly or wrongly.

But indeed, titles may get you to a certain point. Performance is what sticks. I've witness too many financiers in high positions with lofty titles get out due to one or two bad years of performance.

Jan 27, 2011

Ask them what bars they like to go to and offer to buy rounds. Never fails

Jan 27, 2011

I would (and have in the past) done the following when in the exact same position:

  • Refrain from emailing the the entire cast of interviewers.
  • Wait til paperwork is finalized.
  • Maybe send 1 email to the analyst/director/PM that lead the interview process. Literally do not exceed 3 lines. Example: "Thanks. Looking forward to joining. Do you have any recommended reading for the next month?"
Jan 27, 2011

Hi Cries,

Thank you for the advice. Yup, I was thinking along those lines too. Your steps are sequential correct, which would mean send the email after receiving the written offer?

Anyway, since we're on that topic, it's been three days since my verbal offer and still no written offer in sight. Cause for concern? They didn't set a date of when the written offer is due.

Jan 27, 2011
Cries:

I would (and have in the past) done the following when in the exact same position:

- Refrain from emailing the the entire cast of interviewers.
- Wait til paperwork is finalized.
- Maybe send 1 email to the analyst/director/PM that lead the interview process. Literally do not exceed 3 lines. Example: "Thanks. Looking forward to joining. Do you have any recommended reading for the next month?"

Hi everyone,

Just wanna update that after weeks of corresponding with HR on package then signing contract, I'm good to go! Their last word was that my Visa application is submitted and waiting approval, about 4 weeks. Once approved I'm in.

So specific to emailing the employee who coordinated my interviews, presumably the person I'll work under, should I do it now or wait for Visa approval? Btw, my citizenship and travel history are mainly in develop cities in Asia and US. Very likely Visa approved.

What yall think?

Jan 27, 2011

I'd wait a few hours, but definitely send it within 24 hours of the talk. For instance, when I had a series of afternoon interviews, I sent emails that evening.

Jan 27, 2011

So is Sunday morning good, if you have call at 5ish or should i send something around 7?

Jan 27, 2011

I usually ask for the guys card, and send the thank you email from my phone DURING the meeting.

/s

Patrick Bateman would eat Eddie Morra's lunch (and probably his brains).

    • 1
Jan 27, 2011

I have an informational interview a week or so ago, is it too late to send a thank you email?

Jan 27, 2011

It's never too late. Sooner the better.

"I spent the weekend thinking about some of the things you said in our meeting, and it occurred to me I never thanked you for speaking with me! I truly appreciate it."

Blah blah blah.

Patrick Bateman would eat Eddie Morra's lunch (and probably his brains).

Jan 27, 2011

.

Jan 27, 2011

I would wait till the next day, just so you don't come off desperate/way too eager... can't tell you how many times I've heard analysts/associates (even some VPs) make fun of kids that send thank you emails literally right after they meet them... they are not going to forget you met with them after 12-24 hrs (and it will be a good refresher of who you are in their mind)...

Jan 27, 2011

I think it's a bit weird adding them on linkedin right after the conversation, but that's just me.

Jan 27, 2011

Monday morning

Jan 27, 2011

Yeah - first thing Monday morning is probably best

Jan 27, 2011

Never bother anyone on the weekend. You will give someone a heart attack when they see the red light flash on their BlackBerry.

Jan 27, 2011

Thanks gents!

Jan 27, 2011

Oh one more thing guys.

Do I send it together since I interviewed with both of them at the same time..

I.E Dear Name & Name ,

Jan 27, 2011

Send it as soon as you get home / your hotel.

As soon as you walk out of the building, the bankers have already started an email chain discussing you. There's no point doing it the next Monday because decisions pretty much have been made by then. If you do send it late, it's just not going to add to your performance (not that thank-you letters have ever changed anything) but it can give you a chance to keep in touch with someone you really liked.

Jan 27, 2011

Probably not a correlation, but I've stopped sending thank you e-mails and had much better luck with response rate... Did they respond to you?

Jan 27, 2011

The interviews started last fri and going into this week.

They told me up to 2 weeks to get answer while they interview other candidates.

No reply to the thank you email, but I didn't expect one.

Jan 27, 2011

For future reference, if it's not time sensitive (i.e. after an informational interview), then I would recommend sending a thank you email right after, and then sending a card. A while back, another analyst at my bank got a handwritten thank you card from a student he'd spoken with, and it really impressed everyone- it's just that much more personal and sincere, even if it pretty much says the same thing that he said in the thank you email.

Jan 27, 2011

You don't

Jan 27, 2011

lol

Jan 27, 2011

They should be personalized. A template could only have negative results. It is so easy to tell when things are templated

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Jan 27, 2011

yes.

Jan 27, 2011

In the U.S. Yes

Jan 27, 2011

In general, it's pretty standard in business to refer to people you work with by their first names. If you haven't met the person before and you don't yet work at the firm, Mr. / Ms. may be better for Directors and MDs. Honestly calling an associate or analyst Mr. / Ms. is a bit odd.

Jan 27, 2011

I would recommend that anyone use first names in emails like this. However, if you're female doubly so. There is no quicker way to put yourself in an unintended subservient position than to write Mr./Ms./sir/madam. Terrible idea.

(PS -- this is not URGENT)

    • 1
Jan 27, 2011

wow, didn't know this. so you think it's best to not return a thank you note?

Jan 27, 2011
gomi:

wow, didn't know this. so you think it's best to not return a thank you note?

They are fine - I realize they're well-intentioned (but also almost always form letter-type platitudes). I can't say that I usually read past the "I just wanted to thank you for..."

I would just prefer not to get them at all hours of the day. But no, I really don't care if you don't send me one after your interviews.

Jan 27, 2011

Is this sentiment shared by all bankers, or would an interviewee be penalized for not sending a thank you note when every other interviewee has sent a thank you note?

Jan 27, 2011

Yea I never thought they made any difference either.

Jan 27, 2011

Yeah for next day mail hand written thank you notes.

Jan 27, 2011

After my first round interviews on campus my recruiters mentioned this before my final round interview. I asked them about sending thank you emails to all the people I met during final round interviews and they both said the same thing:

"By the time you can get to a computer to send thank you emails the decision on you will have already been made."

In my case, when they made me my offer many of the people who interviewed me during the final rounds called me up to congratulate me and encourage me to sign. At that point go ahead and express your thanks, but thank you emails don't seem that necessary for final round interviews.

Jan 27, 2011

I don't particularly care for thank you notes after interviews because the decision on you has already been made. A thank you note isn't going to change the decision.

Having said that, I like to receive thank you emails after campus presentations. It refreshes my memory on who gave the extra effort to come up and talk to me after the pres. I give extra kudos to those that can bring up something specific we spoke about (not always banking related--maybe we like the same baseball team; it serves as a good refresher).

Jan 27, 2011
WizardofOz:

I don't particularly care for thank you notes after interviews because the decision on you has already been made. A thank you note isn't going to change the decision.

Having said that, I like to receive thank you emails after campus presentations. It refreshes my memory on who gave the extra effort to come up and talk to me after the pres. I give extra kudos to those that can bring up something specific we spoke about (not always banking related--maybe we like the same baseball team; it serves as a good refresher).

Wizard makes a great point. Post campus presentation emails can make a big difference when it comes time to select interviewees. Thank you notes AFTER an interview are usually superfluous.

For the post presentation, try what Wizard suggested. Keep it short, but point out something that nobody else would have talked about. Stay away from generalities. That will
help the recipient remember who you were, and will put a face to the resume.

Jan 27, 2011

Notes are fine as long as they are sent during normal business hours.

Jan 27, 2011

Turning the tables a bit, I always return thank you notes after 2am. It's somewhat a pleas for sympathy...

Jan 27, 2011

On the subject of post-presentation contact:

What tone should an e-mail take? "Thanks for taking the time to talk to me . . . " ?
Or should I come up with some question about the employer or about i-banking in general, even if I probably already know the answer?

Jan 27, 2011

Go with the first approach and mention something specific you spoke with him/her about.

Don't ask stupid questions just for the sake of it.

Jan 27, 2011

Honestly... thank you notes make no difference to me. It annoys me all the more when under-qualified people try too hard to impress.

Jan 27, 2011

I don't mind thank-you-notes, but I have to look at every Blackberry message... and if it interrupts my precious few hours of sleep, I'm not a happy camper.

Jan 27, 2011

I've had experience with both. Sometimes if HR doesn't call, and I send a thank you note, one of my interviewers would respond with "Call me please ASAP". Other ones respond (usually the analysts I meet with) and tend to be really cool, i.e. I"d like to hang out with them even if they weren't my interviewers.

Jan 27, 2011

is it fine to just send thank you emails to the interviewers you liked best, or should it be an all-or-nothing thing in case they compare and get offended?

Jan 27, 2011

I delete them w/o even reading them to be honest.

TY notes are WAY overrated.

Jan 27, 2011

why do you guys not care about letters when most careers do? e.g.

Writing a thank you letter, or thank you email, after an employment interview is a must. In fact, some employers think less of those interviewees who fail to follow-up promptly. Plan to send out your thank you letters as soon as possible (preferably within twenty-four hours) after your interview. (link)

Jan 27, 2011

I wouldn't ignore the importance thank you e-mails since I know for a fact that an e-mail got me the job (I was told this by the person who ultimately hired me).

However, it is true that everyone who interviewed you will have already given their input before you can get home and send an e-mail. That being said, if you're interviewing at a smaller place and you know the people actually making the decisions (the VPs in charge of the analyst program in this case), then it definitely makes sense to e-mail them and address any concerns that they might have.

Keeping all this in mind, 95% of the time, the decision is already made, so don't count on the e-mail salvaging a mediocre interview. But, who knows, it may just be enough to put you over the edge and get you in.

Jan 27, 2011

B/c you're not going to be able to affect your outcome with a TY note.

You either are good or you suck and being polite enough to send a TY note doesn't make a difference.

Jan 27, 2011

I don't understand some of the logic of some people on this thread saying they don't matter, don't send them. I've heard from bankers personally that they will not offer someone if they don't send a thank you note. Some bankers care, some don't. Why take the chance. And perhaps they are really being genuine and do thank them for their time.

Jan 27, 2011

Always send them.

We're just letting them know that usually they have no affect on outcome.

Jan 27, 2011

ok I get it. thanks.

Jan 27, 2011

I would have done Friday after the interview, but in this case I'd do Tues morning.

Jan 27, 2011

monday so he'll remember you for the entire week

Jan 27, 2011

ASAP ?

Jan 27, 2011

I usually send it out an hour after the conversation.

The longer you hold off, the more likely he/she will forget.

Jan 27, 2011

Thanks, just sent it
Also, is it alright to connect on Linkedin afterwards?

Jan 27, 2011

I'd send the letter ASAP. I'm always impressed when a letter arrives quickly.

Regarding LinkedIn, I only do it if the call went really well--otherwise I wait and connect after the 2nd call, or use it as a way to touch base later on. Good luck!

Jan 27, 2011

now

Banking.

Jan 27, 2011

Agreed. Later Friday might not have even been too soon. Monday is definitely too late, and bothering people on weekends isn't so cool.

Jan 27, 2011

Monday is not too late... One business day is acceptable

Jan 27, 2011

Not sure what you ended up doing, but Monday would have been most appropriate.

With e-mails forwarding to phones nowadays, you need to be sensitive to the time you're sending an e-mail of this nature (something unimportant to the recipient). Late Friday would have been inappropriate (anything after 10pm), and Saturday and Sunday are definitely inappropriate (let them have their weekends, they'll forget about your e-mail come Monday anyways). Use the same etiquette you'd use for making phone calls to these guys.

Jan 27, 2011

Thanks for the responses. You guys are right, I think Monday seems most appropriate and luckily I haven't sent it yet.

Jan 27, 2011

Just send it tonight. Don't over think it.

Jan 27, 2011

I'd say send it tomorrow morning only because it's more considerate. Let him enjoy his family or dinner or whatever tonight without his Blackberry going off.

Jan 27, 2011

Do it the next day so they are forced to think about you for two separate days. That was always my philosophy.

Jan 27, 2011
Bowser:

Do it the next day so they are forced to think about you for two separate days. That was always my philosophy.

Lmao this too.

Jan 27, 2011

Ah, both good points. Never thought about it in the context of him being interrupted by some annoying college kid while eating dinner with his family. Thanks for the thoughts, fellas.

Jan 27, 2011

Just do it the next day. That being said, I've gotten emails from MDs past 11pm. As shark-monkey said, don't over think it.

Jan 27, 2011

I feel like it doesn't give you an advantage to send one, but it can hurt you to not send one...

Jan 27, 2011

My opinion is that it's completely irrelevant.

Jan 27, 2011

In my opinion, they don't help you at all, but not sending one might make you stand out in a bad way.

Jan 27, 2011

send one. just don't go into a massive email; the following form should do the trick (adapt as you wish)
Dear xxx,
- great to meet you
- really enjoyed it
- hopefully having the opportunity to work with you in the future
Sincerely,
yyy

No more than 100 words

Jan 27, 2011
Disjoint:

send one. just don't go into a massive email; the following form should do the trick (adapt as you wish)
Dear xxx,
- great to meet you
- really enjoyed it
- hopefully having the opportunity to work with you in the future
Sincerely,
yyy

No more than 100 words

To tell you honestly, mine was about 300 words, talking about how I enjoyed the conversation and would love to work with him in the near future. I also made references from the interview and quoted some of the exact statements he had said. This may he knows I'm really interested. I know 300 words were a bit too long, but I wanted to show him my fullest interest in this opportunity. Was it that terrible of what I did?

Jan 27, 2011

Definitely write thank yous to everyone you interview with, especially if they passed on their business cards to you. It will take a few minutes to write the emails, and you don't want to risk standing out in a negative way.

Jan 27, 2011

I wouldn't say be thorough in the fact that you write a 2 page letter, but be specific so they remember you when they read it. Everyone does it, so it won't put you above anyone else, but like said above, if you forget then you're dinged.

Jan 27, 2011

I always write thank-yous to everyone I interview with, for the same reasons people have already mentioned - limited effort required, low upside / high downside.

I keep them short and simple, but make sure they're personal:

1) Nice to meet you, thanks for your time
2) I appreciate you sharing your perspective on X (personal part - to show you were actually listening)
3) Will look forward to hearing back / working with you in the future

One thing to be careful of - don't send the same stock email to people at the same company. For recruiting, we track all communications with candidates, and it looks bad when all of your thank yous are exactly the same.

Jan 27, 2011

Good to know, thanks charlie

Jan 27, 2011

Definitely don't stop sending them...

Jan 27, 2011

I've never heard of talking about past experiences in a thank you email lol.

Jan 27, 2011

you idiot. you should send one asap! they'll still remember you too and this extra platitude will make all the difference. go get 'em tiger!

Jan 27, 2011

Haha. Obviously that's the only reason they haven't gotten back to me.

Jan 27, 2011

Better late than never, just email them saying you want to thank them again for interviewing you/re-express your strong interest/hope to hear back soon.

Good luck!

Jan 27, 2011

Is this thank you email stuff common in the UK or in Europe, too? Or does this apply only to the US? I have never sent even one thank you email and still got the offers I wanted. So is there anyone in the UK and Europe that does send them as well?

Jan 27, 2011
above_and_beyond:

Is this thank you email stuff common in the UK or in Europe, too? Or does this apply only to the US? I have never sent even one thank you email and still got the offers I wanted. So is there anyone in the UK and Europe that does send them as well?

in Europe people don't tend (emphasis on tend) to hand out their cards. hence, no follow expected or required

Jan 27, 2011
above_and_beyond:

Is this thank you email stuff common in the UK or in Europe, too? Or does this apply only to the US? I have never sent even one thank you email and still got the offers I wanted. So is there anyone in the UK and Europe that does send them as well?

I don't know about the UK or Europe but it's really stupid and I wish it wasn't the norm over here. They are all so generic and silly anyways

Jan 27, 2011

I don't know. I always saw it as another way to remind them of something positive about me, establish a connection. And the neurotic side of me felt good that a lot of times they'd respond back with something like, "it was a pleasure" or whatever. It didn't necessarily mean anything, but when you're in a low information position even for a few days, you cling to what you can.

I think those who are bitter that they have to do X or Y because it's the norm are doing themselves a disservice.

Jan 27, 2011

@Oreos: I got quite a few cards but I never sent a thank you mail after receiving them. It worked out fine for me but I'm still wondering if some people expected those mails.

@Cruncharoo: Exactly, I can't imagine why or how those thank you mails provide any "value" for the applicant. In my opinion, the interviewers tend to make their decision pretty quickly and I just don't think that any form of thank you mail would persuade them to overthink their decision.

@timlambcurry: Actually I see your point, but however, I still can't see the value of sending such an email. But yes, you're absolutely right. Since it is the norm in the US, I guess you should just send them..

Thank you for your opinions guys.

Jan 27, 2011

they are useless, dont worry about it

Jan 27, 2011

generally if i really like them i will send them, otherwise i don't

i really don't think there is any effect... once i didn't send, got a "thank you for visiting us" email two days later, and an offer the next day. yea i felt bad about not sending

Jan 27, 2011

Use the search tool, lots on this topic.

My thoughts? Decisions are probably already made before you get the chance to send a thank you note: so if you're doing it to brown nose or give yourself an edge, it won't help. But yes, if you had a good talk with someone, I don't think it can hurt you to BRIEFLY thank them. Unless of course you send more than a sentence or two, send it at an unreasonable time (remember, blackberries...), or say, "Thnx 4 teh intvw, ttyl!"

Jan 27, 2011

LOL...I don't really recommend using IM vocabulary in a thank-you!

However, if you really did have a genuinely good interview experience, it wouldn't hurt to let them know.

And about timing, wait a day or two. Try to send something hand-written since an email can get lost among the millions in their inbox. If you've asked for a business card (don't forget to ask, especially if it's a one-on-one interview), use the address provided there. Even if you don't get the offer, they'll at least know you're well-mannered.

Jan 27, 2011

they make the decision either that night or the next day, so its even more pointless if you wait2 days to send it

Jan 27, 2011

I find thank you notes to be pretty worthless in terms of swaying an interviewer's thoughts as to whether or not you're a good candidate. However, I find thank you notes to be particularly helpful in sending someone a reminder that you exist and are waiting for a response. For my PE interviews, I typically waited 3-4 days, and sometimes a week, to send thank you notes. Often times I would be either denied or pushed to the next round a day or two later.

~~~~~~~~~~~
CompBanker

Jan 27, 2011

I almost always sent them immediately via Blackberry. I would have a pre-programmed generic Thank you drafted up. As I'm walking out of the building, I'd whip it out, type in "[email protected]" and hit send to each of my interviewers. Can only help.

I don't just do it for super day or interviews in general either. I usually send it to every recruiter I meet on campus, employee who came with that recruiter who I talked to, etc to thank them for their time, and it's worked. They remember your name when they're sifting through hundreds of resumes for interviews later.

I keep brief one or two sentence letters. I usually try to quote something funny or rememberable from our convo at the bottom. I almost always get replies like "glad you found the on campus meet helpful -- and quotable at that! feel free to ask me questions if you have any."

Jan 27, 2011

Hey,
from the sounds of it they might have gone for someone else. I'd just send them a quick email and ask about the status. They know that you have your own plans and need to know how they are gonna proceed with you.
They might just be busy and be thankful for your reminder.

Jan 27, 2011

Give them a call, doesn't hurt. Too easy to ignore an email.

Jan 27, 2011

Send them another email informing them of the level of coarseness and incompetence exhibited by their actions, notably their failure to reply to your initial email. Proceed to thank them for their time and wish them a pleasant afternoon, and safe trip home, and a happy tomorrow. Under ideal circumstances, the aforementioned will yield an offer of employment for the coming summer months. Godspeed ma boi

Jan 27, 2011
turtles:

Send them another email informing them of the level of coarseness and incompetence exhibited by their actions, notably their failure to reply to your initial email. Proceed to thank them for their time and wish them a pleasant afternoon, and safe trip home, and a happy tomorrow. Under ideal circumstances, the aforementioned will yield an offer of employment for the coming summer months. Godspeed ma boi

What happened when there's still no reply to such a follow-up email? A very polite one, wished them a good day, and didn't inform the "level of coarseness and incompetence" at all.

Time to move on?

The Auto Show

Jan 27, 2011

Good Afternoon NAME,

We spoke on DATE and I wanted to follow up this week to ask about any progress made with my application. I am still very interested in the POSITION TITLE with BANK and thought it would be best to touch base.

Thank you,

Jan 27, 2011

fml got dinged. Guess it's time to cold call other branches

Jan 27, 2011

Call them. Tell them you are interested, can add value, and are ready to get started. Ask if there is anything you can provide to help them make a decision.

Jan 27, 2011

I agree with SirPoopsalot. You should contact them and let them know what you are and what you can do.

Jan 27, 2011

Thank you SirPoopsalot and donald!

What's the best time to call? the interviewer is on the buy side.

Just want to be extra careful because i maybe labelled as pestering.

The Auto Show

Jan 27, 2011
huanleshalemei:

What's the best time to call? the interviewer is on the buy side.

After 4 PM EST.

Jan 27, 2011

Could learn how the email addresses are assigned at the company:

[email protected]

Could call the switchboard / receptionist and ask for his email. Explain to them that you interviewed.

Could hit him up on linkedin.

You could use linkedin to look at peoples profiles who are at the same company and see what their email address is to learn what form / structure they give the address as well.

Jan 27, 2011
Cookies With Milken:

Could learn how the email addresses are assigned at the company:

[email protected]

Could call the switchboard / receptionist and ask for his email. Explain to them that you interviewed.

Could hit him up on linkedin.

You could use linkedin to look at peoples profiles who are at the same company and see what their email address is to learn what form / structure they give the address as well.

This. Don't send a note via snail mail unless the place is super old school

Jan 27, 2011

You could ask him for his contact information as well

Jan 27, 2011

You are thinking way too hard about this. No one cares enough to actually read the emails, they have more important stuff to do like actually work. Just send the email after the interview so that they don't forget who you are and make sure it's half decent on the off chance that they actually read your email

Jan 27, 2011

I think a card is a bit gay, especially right after the interview. Just send nice thank you e-mail that night.

Jan 27, 2011

Simply send a follow-up email within 24 hours. It demonstrates you were committed, you're very interested, and you're sincere. A card is probably a bit over the top, as the MD who ended up dropping my offer and scholarship literally opened a stack of hand-written cards in front of me on the trading floor to make sure there wasn't a gift/check in the envelope and then dropped them all in the trash. The chance that they'll even read, let alone reply to the email is minimal.

Jan 27, 2011

Send it Saturday if you want but they won't see it till Monday (if you spoke to HR)

Jan 27, 2011

there's nothing you could do, just wait. otherwise you may come off as annoying, they are just too busy for you.

Jan 27, 2011

No need to send another thank you. DonA't worry though. Many interviewers donA't respond to post-interviewe thank you emails. I wouldnA't read anything into it.

Jan 27, 2011

I agree. I got about 3 responses from 6 I sent. They read them (return receipts) just sometimes found no reason to respond I assume.

Jan 27, 2011

Thanks Guys

Jan 27, 2011

The next day. I wouldn't wait any longer than that. I also wouldn't send it the same day, but that's just me.

Jan 27, 2011

I'd say a few hours after a phone interview. Chances are that the interviewer assumes you are nearby a computer anyway.

Jan 27, 2011

Agree with Muzach, few hours after - at the latest. This way you are fresh in their memory, any later and you get lost in cyber space along with all the other candidates defeating the letters purpose.

Jan 27, 2011

Yeah it shouldn't really be much longer than a few sentences either. It's mostly so that the interviewer has your email address I think.

Jan 27, 2011

Awkward email to write

Jan 27, 2011

"Thank you for the opportunity to discuss opportunities at X firm. I enjoyed meeting the team and look forward to hearing your decision."

Jan 27, 2011

I would say "I look forward to further discussing my application with you," as the telephone interview is almost always the first round of the application process.

Jan 27, 2011

Hello [First Name],

Thanks for taking the time to speak with me [today, yesterday, whenever] about your background in [prostitution/ banking/ trading]. I appreciate the advice you gave me regarding [mention something important you discussed]. If I'm ever in [city] I would love to grab [fried chicken, coffee, drinks, lunch] to discuss [cite something discussed] further. Thank you for your advice.

Regards,
[Person who doesn't know how to type a fucking thank you email and requires the help of career services to get by]

    • 1
Jan 27, 2011

Anyone?

Jan 27, 2011

They gave you the card for a reason... ask away

at least I would/ and do

It has gotten me awesome contacts

Jan 27, 2011
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Because when you're in a room full of smart people, smart suddenly doesn't matter--interesting is what matters.

Jan 27, 2011
Jan 27, 2011
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