5/4/13

My group isn't in NYC, but when we work alongside our product group counterparts telephonically -- essentially every single day -- everyone in the NYC office loves to tell me how good I've got it because I'm not in the city.

And I'll admit, I love being in a smaller city, I love paying reasonable prices for food, gas and rent, and I love being able to drive to Wal-Mart to buy everything under the sun without having to worry about items being sold out because I live in an extremely overcrowded city.

But whenever I visit NYC it's always totally awesome.

This board is certainly obsessed with NYC -- it offers myriad things to do, has the class and prestige, is considered by many, even universally, to be the greatest city on earth and is the center of the finance world. As a somewhat frequent visitor, however, I rarely see what you guys have to deal with: cockroaches, $1700 rent amounts for a closet-sized room, constantly overcrowded restaurants and an aging, albeit robust, mass transit system.

This is all to say that it seems rare (and odd) when I talk to someone that is militantly in love with NYC who isn't originally from there.

Yeah, everyone I've ever known who was born and raised in NYC is gung-ho crazy about the city. The transplants, on the other hand, want to all say they "love" it, but at the same time seem pretty overwhelmed by the amount of discomfort associated with living there. And I think the last thing one needs in life when working 16-18 hours a day is _more_ discomfort.

So, monkeys who came to NYC for work and aren't from there originally: do you love it? Do you plan on staying forever, or just for the foreseeable future? Are you counting down the days until you get to move back to a place that's a little more laid-back?

For me personally, doing the banking thing outside of NYC is pretty great -- though I think many people on this board would argue that if it's outside of NYC, it somehow "doesn't count" as investment banking. I disagree with those naysayers wholeheartedly -- what do you guys think?

Stay classy, New York City.

Thanks for reading.

Comments (112)

Best Response
4/29/13

I'll give you a few reasons:

- cost of living
- crowded
- terrorism
- hurricanes
- douche bags everywhere
- too hot in summer
- too cold in winter
- it rains more here than in Seattle
- dirty as shit
- bums
- obsession with money
- Mark Sanchez
- horrible place to raise kids (even in the suburbs)

What else you got? I'll probably hate that too.

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

4/29/13
4/29/13

I also know so many people who live in NYC and hate living in NYC I actually love living in manhattan despite the expense. I enjoy the proximity to anything I want to do, and my addiction to cars does not outweigh the requirements of maintaining a car. I do dislike how dirty (trash and people wise) some parts of the city can be, but if you live in the right place even this is avoidable. I grew up in a suburban town outside Boston and plan to stay here for some time, but then would like to venture to either Texas or California for the weather and space.

Edit: And I had two cockroaches this weekend which is rare. The huge flying ones that snuck in through the window seam. Three all time, I definitely have experienced the terrible aspects but a bug isn't going to make me hate it.

Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

4/29/13

Why doesn't "anyone" actually like NYC? Are you kidding me? I love living here, and so do the majority of people here. What a stupid thread. I'm happy to hear that your ability to drive to wal-mart is what makes everywhere else better than NYC.

Btw amazon is usually cheaper and far more convenient than wal-mart, just fyi.

4/29/13

i think most people who chose to live in nyc love it, myself included. that being said, we love complaining about it. like when people from non-major cities complain about rent, prices or whatever, it's almost like some twisted badge of honor for nycers to retort with a complaint about how tough they have it (tiny, overpriced apartments, expensive beers, etc). i don't know the people you work with, or communicate with, who live in nyc, but try insulting nyc... i bet you'll hear a barrage of reasons why it's 1000x better than wherever you live. i'm not saying whether or not that's true, but as much as nycers complain about living here, we defend our choice to live here like you wouldn't believe.

Remember, once you're inside you're on your own.
Oh, you mean I can't count on you?
No.
Good!

4/29/13

We complain about it because we can. Snakeplissken said it best.

In reply to FutureLRO
4/29/13
4/29/13

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My story | My Linkedin

PM me if you're traveling to Buenos Aires in 2016 (I live here) :-)

4/29/13

I don't like living in NYC and will be moving out in a few months.

NYC is great if you like shopping, plays, museums, art, going to expensive restaurants, carrying everything, and nightlife (not necessarily better, just more)

It's not great if you like playing tennis, going for bike rides, throwing a football around, having a dog, enjoy driving, not being constantly wary of what the weather is, being comfortable in your own home and if you would prefer to grocery shop over going out to eat every meal.

I imagine it's a lot more fun if you're a girl.

4/29/13

I'm incredibly jealous that I'm not in NYC, although I guess I can understand why it would get old at some point.

4/29/13

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:

I'll give you a few reasons:

- cost of living
- crowded
- terrorism
- hurricanes
- douche bags everywhere
- too hot in summer
- too cold in winter
- it rains more here than in Seattle
- dirty as shit
- bums
- obsession with money
- Mark Sanchez
- horrible place to raise kids (even in the suburbs)

What else you got? I'll probably hate that too.

Tim Tebow

At least y'all fixed that one today.

4/29/13

I want to move to Texas

4/29/13

DonVon:

My group isn't in NYC, but when we work alongside our product group counterparts telephonically -- essentially every single day -- everyone in the NYC office loves to tell me how good I've got it because I'm not in the city.

They're humoring you.

4/29/13

I love living in New York, and I'm a Midwest transplant. I do miss driving every now and then, and wish I could afford a nicer apartment, but that's about all the complaints I have. Also, the expensive rent is somewhat offset by not having a car/insurance to worry about.

In reply to Edmundo Braverman
4/29/13

Edmundo Braverman:

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

my god, how could I forget tourists? Truly painful.

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

4/29/13

I think you've got it backwards, DonVon. It's the transplants who think New York is the greatest. The people who grew up in the area tend to be the jaded, self-reverent stereotype because they know it's not that great.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:

Edmundo Braverman:

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

my god, how could I forget tourists? Truly painful.

You also forgot Mayor Bloomberg.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

4/29/13
In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:

Edmundo Braverman:

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

my god, how could I forget tourists? Truly painful.

I hate tourists with the white-hot intensity of a thousand dying suns.

4/29/13

There is a difference between going there for a day and working there 300+ days a year.

Mps721

4/29/13

Lived and grew up outside NyC my whole life. I love going to the city and going out at nights. Only a 40 minute train ride very easy. Got a job just oustide of NYC and loving it. Doing the analyst gig right outside the city (white plains) is great. Much lower cost of living. Still a great nightlife. Can keep a car. City is only 20 minute train ride. Stay at friends places when i want to stay over. And am saving way more on rent.

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:

I'll give you a few reasons:

- cost of living
- crowded
- terrorism
- hurricanes
- douche bags everywhere
- too hot in summer
- too cold in winter
- it rains more here than in Seattle
- dirty as shit
- bums
- obsession with money
- Mark Sanchez
- horrible place to raise kids (even in the suburbs)

What else you got? I'll probably hate that too.

Cost of living is high because incomes here are high. Are you complaining about the high incomes too?

Crowded -- the density results in a LOT of benefits. Think about all the diversity of restaurants, nightlife, etc that can only exist bc of the population density.

Do you mean perceived terrorism? Actual historical terrorist effects are low on a per capita basis.

Hurricanes -- recency bias. Extreme weather is NYC is largely non-existent.

Dbags -- NYC people are real not fake. Extreme dbaggery usually comes from BnT crowd, not actually people from NYC.

Most people like seasons, but this is all subjective.

Amount of rain in inches/year is not as relevant as % of days with precipitation.

There are bums in every city, though NYC is dirtier than most. This is an offshoot of the density.

Obsession with money is more rational than people who work eight hours a day and then claim money isn't important to them. They're in denial.

Sports in NYC are amazing. We have nine major sports teams, so we're bound to have to have a few bad apples.

You don't need to optimize for kids until you actually have them. When you do, there are many excellent suburbs in the NYC area if that floats your boat.

4/29/13

I lived in NYC for 2.5 years and had my fill. I still love to visit (and frequently do), but it's better in small doses.

"For I am a sinner in the hands of an angry God. Bloody Mary full of vodka, blessed are you among cocktails. Pray for me now and at the hour of my death, which I hope is soon. Amen."

In reply to justin88
4/29/13

justin88:

SirTradesaLot:

I'll give you a few reasons:

- cost of living
- crowded
- terrorism
- hurricanes
- douche bags everywhere
- too hot in summer
- too cold in winter
- it rains more here than in Seattle
- dirty as shit
- bums
- obsession with money
- Mark Sanchez
- horrible place to raise kids (even in the suburbs)

What else you got? I'll probably hate that too.

Cost of living is high because incomes here are high. Are you complaining about the high incomes too?

Crowded -- the density results in a LOT of benefits. Think about all the diversity of restaurants, nightlife, etc that can only exist bc of the population density.

Do you mean perceived terrorism? Actual historical terrorist effects are low on a per capita basis.

Hurricanes -- recency bias. Extreme weather is NYC is largely non-existent.

Dbags -- NYC people are real not fake. Extreme dbaggery usually comes from BnT crowd, not actually people from NYC.

Most people like seasons, but this is all subjective.

Amount of rain in inches/year is not as relevant as % of days with precipitation.

There are bums in every city, though NYC is dirtier than most. This is an offshoot of the density.

Obsession with money is more rational than people who work eight hours a day and then claim money isn't important to them. They're in denial.

Sports in NYC are amazing. We have nine major sports teams, so we're bound to have to have a few bad apples.

You don't need to optimize for kids until you actually have them. When you do, there are many excellent suburbs in the NYC area if that floats your boat.

You sound like a loser transplant

To fade me its gonna take more than guts, you need the eye of the tiger, heart of a lion and King Kong's nuts

4/29/13

Wal-Mart kicks ass, actually. All you Wal-Mart haters can SUCK it.

4/29/13

Most people don't like NYC because they can't afford to do all of the things that make NYC awesome.

I

4/29/13

I have only visited NYC, but I have to agree. NYC would suck to live in compared to many other major cities. London is a way better city to live in. It has better culture, more history, more moderate temperature than NYC, good night life, cheap flights to some of the best get aways in the world, and the list goes on. Also, Canary Wharf kicks ass. The tube sucks, especially if you have to use the Jubilee and DLR, but it's still better than NYC subway imo.

4/29/13

I hate large cities, even though I grew up in the NYC suburbs. Taking the Port Washington line of the LIRR for ~25 minutes to my water front estate on the North Shore is more my style, albeit that is a bit out of my price range. =[

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

4/29/13

I fucking hate it here, I grew up in the suburbs and only moved here 3 years ago, but already sick of it. My girl on the other hand loves it since it reminds her of home (she grew up in a major city in Asia)

4/29/13

Good in small doses now. Loved the idea of it when I decided to go to NYU, but got pretty tired of it after graduating. Not sure if the good aspects of the city out weigh all the shitty ones, but I am glad I lived there for a while.

4/29/13

nyc is garbage unless you're making serious money or you're a hot chick..seriously..or..unless you're some kind of homosexual or artist type person..

alpha currency trader wanna-be

In reply to Edmundo Braverman
4/29/13

Edmundo Braverman:

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

Why stay then? Aren't you semi-retired and pretty mobile? Why not find some place warm and uncrowded?

Can't speak for NYC specifically, but I think in life in one of the major cities in general (NYC, SF, LA, Paris, Tokyo, etc.) can elicit ire because basic life is just a grind so much of the time. You are always in some sort of line, you are always hauling shit up and down things, you are always competing for space and/or resources with a million other people, you are constantly inundated by noise, and someone is always trying to squeeze another dollar out of you. It's the nature of being in the hive.

In reply to labanker
4/29/13

labanker:

Edmundo Braverman:

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

Why stay then? Aren't you semi-retired and pretty mobile? Why not find some place warm and uncrowded?

Can't speak for NYC specifically either, but I think in life in one of the major cities in general (NYC, SF, LA, Paris, Tokyo, etc.) can elicit ire because basic life is just a grind so much of the time. You are always in some sort of line, you are always hauling shit up and down things, you are always competing for space and/or resources with a million other people, you are constantly inundated by noise, and someone is always trying to squeeze another dollar out of you. It's the nature of being in the hive.

In reply to justin88
4/29/13

justin88:

SirTradesaLot:

I'll give you a few reasons:

- cost of living
- crowded
- terrorism
- hurricanes
- douche bags everywhere
- too hot in summer
- too cold in winter
- it rains more here than in Seattle
- dirty as shit
- bums
- obsession with money
- Mark Sanchez
- horrible place to raise kids (even in the suburbs)

What else you got? I'll probably hate that too.

Cost of living is high because incomes here are high. Are you complaining about the high incomes too?

Crowded -- the density results in a LOT of benefits. Think about all the diversity of restaurants, nightlife, etc that can only exist bc of the population density.

Do you mean perceived terrorism? Actual historical terrorist effects are low on a per capita basis.

Hurricanes -- recency bias. Extreme weather is NYC is largely non-existent.

Dbags -- NYC people are real not fake. Extreme dbaggery usually comes from BnT crowd, not actually people from NYC.

Most people like seasons, but this is all subjective.

Amount of rain in inches/year is not as relevant as % of days with precipitation.

There are bums in every city, though NYC is dirtier than most. This is an offshoot of the density.

Obsession with money is more rational than people who work eight hours a day and then claim money isn't important to them. They're in denial.

Sports in NYC are amazing. We have nine major sports teams, so we're bound to have to have a few bad apples.

You don't need to optimize for kids until you actually have them. When you do, there are many excellent suburbs in the NYC area if that floats your boat.


If NYC hasn't lost the luster for you, usually that means you haven't been here long enough yet. Amazingly, some people like this dump even after staying here a long time. I am not one of them.

Also, I think people discount the threat of terrorism way too much. I saw what happened on 9/11 and while that was horrible, it would be much worse with a small nuke or some sort of chemical weapon. If someone was going to deploy those anywhere in the US, there's probably over an 80% chance it would be in Manhattan.

And finally, the 'real New Yorkers' generally are the BnT crowd, not people from Manhattan, most of whom are from elsewhere originally.

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

4/29/13

For those of you wanting to go to Texas, I love it here in Houston. However, let me clear up the Texas vs. NYC argument. NYC is great if you are young, don't want to have a family and are extremely career oriented. There is a big rivalry in my bank between the different markets on why each city is better. Houston is not a party city, although there is some decent nightlife, it won't compare to NYC. However, Houston is a city you want to be in long-term, it's laidback, cost of living is cheap. Everyone I work with has a 5k sqft house or bigger, something that most couldn't even touch in NYC. NYC is great if your young and don't care about savings, Texas is more for raising a family and starting a fresh life. One of my NYC analyst buddies visited me in Houston and saw that I had a huge apartment all to myself that was built in 2007 and in one of the nicest areas in Houston. I am paying half the rent he is. Plus we don't got state income tax which helps alot. I am considering moving to NYC mainly because my family is upstate, but when I make enough money, this is where I am coming back.

In reply to Edmundo Braverman
4/29/13

Edmundo Braverman:

my god, how could I forget tourists? Truly painful.

I hate tourists with the white-hot intensity of a thousand dying suns.

Do they have any Romanian gypsies in NYC like they do in Paris ?

"I like money (as do most females) but love is...great :)"-student
"Perhaps you've failed to take into account my hidden assets"-007
Omnia

In reply to jiggider
4/29/13

CrazyWaferS:

I have only visited NYC, but I have to agree. NYC would suck to live in compared to many other major cities. London is a way better city to live in. It has better culture, more history, more moderate temperature than NYC, good night life, cheap flights to some of the best get aways in the world, and the list goes on. Also, Canary Wharf kicks ass. The tube sucks, especially if you have to use the Jubilee and DLR, but it's still better than NYC subway imo.

I tend to agree with you, the problem with London is the weather.
Can't speak for NYC never been there (even if I would love to).

In reply to jiggider
4/29/13
4/29/13

I think that New York does have it's shortcomings, yes.
However, keep in mind that a lot of people are also there before there's something about the lifestyle that they just can't turn away, once they experience it.

As for me, I love New York. It really depends on where you live. Downtown can be quite nice in the evening

I'm not concerned with the very poor
-Mitt Romney

In reply to job.resume
4/29/13

job.resume:

I don't like living in NYC and will be moving out in a few months.

NYC is great if you like shopping, plays, museums, art, going to expensive restaurants, carrying everything, and nightlife (not necessarily better, just more)

It's not great if you like playing tennis, going for bike rides, throwing a football around, having a dog, enjoy driving, not being constantly wary of what the weather is, being comfortable in your own home and if you would prefer to grocery shop over going out to eat every meal.

I imagine it's a lot more fun if you're a girl.

As far as shopping, its all online anyway. Restaurants, museums and the performing arts are all there. Nightlife is good but doesn't really hold a candle to major European capitals, mostly because people you'll find in the clubs. Most of the downsides you list can be managed, some others, such as education, can be unmanageable depending on the situation. The other big downside, cost of living, is less of a consideration for people in this industry/on this board.

People tend to compare NYC to a college campus and miss the value of all that urban density. Ask buddies in the suburbs how hard it is to meet friends when they are 20+ miles away (rough equivalent of doing to Williamsburg with regard to travel time). The same is true for professional events - again, ask someone in San Jose how often they make it out to SF for things like tech meetups.

The housing thing is dumb when you consider that NYCers don't need a car/insurance. Sure rent on a studio is $1800 a month, but the payment on a car in line with many of our lifestyles is going to be over $300. As long as you don't actually need the space (i.e. no family/home office/entertaining) who cares?

4/29/13

Some people have this weird public transit fetish. There are some advantages to density but it also has downsides (bedbugs, more difficult to haul stuff around, expensive groceries within walking distance, etc.)

Get work experience in NYC and then move elsewhere - you can always go back and visit.

In reply to BatMasterson
4/29/13

Financier4Hire:

Edmundo Braverman:

my god, how could I forget tourists? Truly painful.

I hate tourists with the white-hot intensity of a thousand dying suns.

Do they have any Romanian gypsies in NYC like they do in Paris ?

The gypsies alone probably knock Paris 5-10 spots down the best cities list.

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:

If NYC hasn't lost the luster for you, usually that means you haven't been here long enough yet. Amazingly, some people like this dump even after staying here a long time. I am not one of them.

Also, I think people discount the threat of terrorism way too much. I saw what happened on 9/11 and while that was horrible, it would be much worse with a small nuke or some sort of chemical weapon. If someone was going to deploy those anywhere in the US, there's probably over an 80% chance it would be in Manhattan.

And finally, the 'real New Yorkers' generally are the BnT crowd, not people from Manhattan, most of whom are from elsewhere originally.

I've lived in Manhattan for almost 10 years. Certainly it's not for everybody, but it gets a lot better once you make enough money to live comfortably and save money. For me, this was after a few years in the business (age 24).

80% is too high. DC is a big target as well; NYC wasn't the only target on 9/11.

I've met a bunch of people who commute in from New Jersey and call themselves New Yorkers, LOL.

Since you don't like NYC, where would you prefer to be?

4/29/13

I personally love walking to work and that is coming from a car enthusiast. Granted I drive every once in a while, but being able to walk to work and break away from the world is nice. Being able to go out any night of the week and having friends who will drink or people that are partying is great. Food is great as you have all sorts of cuisines at your finger tips. Lot of history, artwork, parks, etc. Having anything you want to do all within walking distance, or 10-20 minute cab right is a great feeling.Granted my life is mostly at work so it is nice to have everything close to where I work and where I live. Time is precious.

That being said the second I get married and have kids, I am moving to suburbs (unless I find myself super wealthy-even then likely wont matter).

4/29/13

The easiest way to tell someone's not from NYC is when they talk about how awesome it is

In reply to justin88
4/29/13

justin88:

SirTradesaLot:

If NYC hasn't lost the luster for you, usually that means you haven't been here long enough yet. Amazingly, some people like this dump even after staying here a long time. I am not one of them.

Also, I think people discount the threat of terrorism way too much. I saw what happened on 9/11 and while that was horrible, it would be much worse with a small nuke or some sort of chemical weapon. If someone was going to deploy those anywhere in the US, there's probably over an 80% chance it would be in Manhattan.

And finally, the 'real New Yorkers' generally are the BnT crowd, not people from Manhattan, most of whom are from elsewhere originally.

I've lived in Manhattan for almost 10 years. Certainly it's not for everybody, but it gets a lot better once you make enough money to live comfortably and save money. For me, this was after a few years in the business (age 24).

80% is too high. DC is a big target as well; NYC wasn't the only target on 9/11.

I've met a bunch of people who commute in from New Jersey and call themselves New Yorkers, LOL.

Since you don't like NYC, where would you prefer to be?

These are difficult to pull off while you're still working (which is why I'm still here), but Miami or Austin would be ideal. Maybe some small mountain town with a lake, like Tahoe or Coeur d'Alene.

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:

These are difficult to pull off while you're still working (which is why I'm still here), but Miami or Austin would be ideal.

Yeah, I get crushed on state/local taxes as well.

It's possible to spend a fair amount of time in Miami (weekends) while working in NYC.

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:
Maybe some small mountain town with a lake, like Tahoe or Coeur d'Alene.

I knocked the bottom out of a chick in a van in Couer d'Alene. True story. (Full disclosure: she was imported from Spokane)

In reply to labanker
4/29/13

labanker:

Edmundo Braverman:

Can't speak to NYC, but from the standpoint of another major city I've come to detest Paris. There are a lot of reasons, but I imagine my main complaint would stand true in the Big Apple as well - I'm sick of having a million people up my ass every minute of every day. I'm just fucking sick to death of humanity, and there isn't a square inch in this fucking town that isn't occupied by some dumb-as-a-bag-of-hammers tourist or some other lower life form.

Why stay then? Aren't you semi-retired and pretty mobile? Why not find some place warm and uncrowded?

It's because my kids are in such a goddammed great situation at school and I'd just hate to move them. I swear it's the only thing keeping me here.

In reply to meabric
4/29/13

Bad example with San Jose. In a city of 1MM people at the epicenter of the tech and VC communities there are plenty of tech meetups you don't have to travel to SF for.

Also, the housing argument is not a dumb one. Your statement about the studio for $1,800 being fine because you don't need that much space is not the point. The point is that if you don't need that much space, you can spend less than half that much rent $ living somewhere else.

4/29/13

Red Sox fan, it's in our blood.

In reply to meabric
4/29/13

meabric:

job.resume:

I don't like living in NYC and will be moving out in a few months.

NYC is great if you like shopping, plays, museums, art, going to expensive restaurants, carrying everything, and nightlife (not necessarily better, just more)

It's not great if you like playing tennis, going for bike rides, throwing a football around, having a dog, enjoy driving, not being constantly wary of what the weather is, being comfortable in your own home and if you would prefer to grocery shop over going out to eat every meal.

I imagine it's a lot more fun if you're a girl.

As far as shopping, its all online anyway. Restaurants, museums and the performing arts are all there. Nightlife is good but doesn't really hold a candle to major European capitals, mostly because people you'll find in the clubs. Most of the downsides you list can be managed, some others, such as education, can be unmanageable depending on the situation. The other big downside, cost of living, is less of a consideration for people in this industry/on this board.

People tend to compare NYC to a college campus and miss the value of all that urban density. Ask buddies in the suburbs how hard it is to meet friends when they are 20+ miles away (rough equivalent of doing to Williamsburg with regard to travel time). The same is true for professional events - again, ask someone in San Jose how often they make it out to SF for things like tech meetups.

The housing thing is dumb when you consider that NYCers don't need a car/insurance. Sure rent on a studio is $1800 a month, but the payment on a car in line with many of our lifestyles is going to be over $300. As long as you don't actually need the space (i.e. no family/home office/entertaining) who cares?

Or you could live in Chicago and spend a grand on a sick apartment and still not need a car. Makes the bank account grow rather quickly.

I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

In reply to Champs46
4/29/13

Champs46:

The easiest way to tell someone's not from NYC is when they talk about how awesome it is

So much this

Sometimes I go about in pity for myself, and all the while a great wind carries me across the sky
4/29/13

NYC in your early to mid 20s is an amazing place to be single, especially a single guy given the skewed gener ratio. However, later on, the city becomes a grind. At most firms across industries from my representative sample of friends, you'll work longer hours in NYC. Not sure what it is, but in other cities, maybe people have families, have other things going on in their lives, and just don't do face time at work like in NYC. In addition, you'll earn pretty much comparable salaries across cities, but the expenses greatly outpace any marginal salary differences. And, carrying groceries flights of stairs, overpriced bars, etc. I love to visit, but glad I don't live there anymore.

4/29/13

Very different place across industries. I find people in the arts tend to love it. Journalism, advertising, media, design, architecture, film etc. Basically because they have their "community".

I love the city because of the density.. eating out, going to concerts, games, events etc. The truth is America doesn't have great urban living compared to Europe and parts of Asia and South America. Chicago, Austin, San Francisco i suppose, and NY of course, but it's quite expensive...more for the uber rich i.e. ceo, athlete, hedge fund, film types.

It's hard to find the "good life" at an affordable price.. being able to walk everywhere, get fresh food, bike safely, slay hotties, and party at cool places..So i guess you're screwed if you don't like suburban living / aren't a millionaire

I must say, Montreal has all those things. Wish it wasn't so damn cold in the winter

4/29/13

Best part about NYC: I know the spots to take a poop where it's quiet. Albeit ... only in the midtown area. It's such a good feeling, taking a dump outside of work in a nice bathroom that is not well known.

In reply to karypto
4/29/13

karypto:

Best part about NYC: I know the spots to take a poop where it's quiet. Albeit ... only in the midtown area. It's such a good feeling, taking a dump outside of work in a nice bathroom that is not well known.

LOL. I guess that's a bit ironic considering that the city is literally covered in poop.

Sometimes I go about in pity for myself, and all the while a great wind carries me across the sky
In reply to karypto
4/29/13

karypto:

Best part about NYC: I know the spots to take a poop where it's quiet. Albeit ... only in the midtown area. It's such a good feeling, taking a dump outside of work in a nice bathroom that is not well known.

Knowing where to take a shit is the nicest thing you can say about the city. This sums up why this town sucks better than any points I could have made.

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/29/13

SirTradesaLot:
These are difficult to pull off while you're still working (which is why I'm still here), but Miami or Austin would be ideal. Maybe some small mountain town with a lake, like Tahoe or Coeur d'Alene

Ausssssstin! Fun fun fun!!!

xoxo

Dirk Dirkenson:
Shut up already. Your mindless, reflexive responses to any critical thought on this are tedious. You're also probably a woman, given the name and "xoxo" signoff, so maybe the lack of judgment is to be expected.
4/30/13

I'm a single woman living in NYC (part time), grew up in NYC and has lived in cities like London, HK, Paris and Shanghai. Though I've never lived in anywhere else in the US, I however, have spent sometimes vacationing in Austin and SF. And let me tell you this. The only con of NYC is the lack of outdoor activities (in Manhattan).

I'm in 20's, I eat out once or twice a week, have a night out once a week. I love outdoor sports (the options are limited but they ARE people out there who goes out and play football/basketball/soccer at the parks, I play flag football bi-weekly when I'm in town.)

Upstate NY is also actually pretty damn cool for some laid-back outdoor activities if you had a car. I absolutely love NYC and the reason why a lot of people say it's the greatest city on earth is because... it is the greatest city on earth. I honestly don't think NYC is THAT nasty. Actually, I don't think it's dirty at all. China town is dirty, the rest of NYC is ok.

I do have some friends on the street hate it here, but if you're not happy with yourself the chance is you probably won't be happy anywhere else. So you work long hrs, man the fkc up and deal with it. This is the career you chose, nobody wants to be around a depressed weak minded dude who can't get over his work hrs/the weather. You think you hate NYC? NYC hates you! Grow up and learn to enjoy yourself. I'm also so tired of the whole weather argument, just stop being a weak minded fck, there are tons of things going on in life and in this world and you choose to let the weather be a key factor of your misery? Sounds like a real man to me.

4/30/13

NYC would be awesome at 500k a year. That said, it would be awesome because you could live like you make 250k a year in almost any other city.

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

4/30/13

I'm from there and I'm tired of the damn place. I'm moving down south.

4/30/13

New York is a dump and anyone who says otherwise is delusional. Quality of life (especially if you work in banking but true for most professions in NYC) sucks hard. People are not meant to live in these types of conditions.

People tend to think life is a race with other people. They don't realize that every moment they spend sprinting towards the finish line is a moment they lose permanently, and a moment closer to their death.

4/30/13

I think this really comes down to how much you value material possessions and luxury vs. having an active life and a diversity of personal / professional opportunities.

Having lived in Texas and Chicago, it's abundantly clear that your material lifestyle is significantly better outside of SF/NY/LA. There is merit to the point that the NYer spending $1,700 on rent isn't paying for a car, which, if my friends in Houston / Dallas are any barometer, would be >$600 per month for the type of car that people on this forum are interested in. However, for most people, having a nice car is the pinnacle of material possessions: all your friends see it, you ride in it every day - having a nice car and a nice apartment make you feel more successful and put you at ease. The vast majority of people would rather have a nice car and a nice apartment for $1,700 per month than a small apartment and a trip to work on the subway for the same price.

Honestly, the people complaining about grocery prices / the cost of beer are splitting hairs. Who cares about that stuff? It doesn't really move the needle. As far as I can tell, the real "things that are better" for non NY/SF/LA cities are cars and apartments.

On the other hand, when you get out of your car / apartment, you're still in Houston / Dallas. These cities just don't have the sheer volume of restaurants, clubs, bars, neighborhoods, people, art, theatre, movies, jobs, etc. The advantages I have felt from living in NYC primarily relate to being able to do whatever I want whenever I want. I want to grab Thai food within walking distance at 3:00 AM on a Tuesday? I can do that. I want to see a limited release film? I can do that. I want to go to a bar with bankers or hippies or journalists or doctors or whatever fits my fancy? I can do that. There are great parts of Dallas / Houston, but while living there, I inevitably found myself doing the same few things over and over again. That can still be extremely fun with the right crowd - but it's a trade off.

The other distinct positive to living in NYC is the career opps. Regardless of what industry you want to be in, what position you're shooting for, what type of culture you're seeking - you can find it in NYC. As I've been interviewing the last month or so, I am able to slip away and walk a few blocks to interviews at a host of different firms. Just by virtue of knowing a bunch of people in the city, I find that job opportunities fall into my lap with regularity. My friends in Dallas / Houston don't have this same experience.

As always, capitalism works. There will never be a "perfect city", because everyone would move there, the cost of living would skyrocket and then that would be a drawback to living there. As far as I can tell, that's what explains NYC. Just by looking at the supply/demand dynamics for apartments here will demonstrate to you that more people prefer to live in NY than in Dallas from a pure geographical standpoint. Therefore, it depends on what you like.

For the right price, anyone would live just about anywhere (within reason). And when you look at the prices, different people will come to different conclusions about what living situation offers an attractive value proposition. To some, NY will look underpriced relative to the opportunities / variety here; to others, it will look absurdly overpriced relative to the luxury / space that they could have elsewhere.

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

4/30/13

Also, the grass is always greener. I know more NYers who are determined to move to Houston than I know Houstonites that are thrilled about staying in Houston. I also know more Houstonites that are determined to get a job in NY than NYers who are thrilled about staying in NY. It's a hedonic treadmill, folks.

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

In reply to Y2A
4/30/13

Y2A:

I fucking hate it here, I grew up in the suburbs and only moved here 3 years ago, but already sick of it. My girl on the other hand loves it since it reminds her of home (she grew up in a major city in Asia)

Sounds like my exact story. Ended breaking up for this reason - gl

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/30/13

SirTradesaLot:
SirTradesaLot:

I've lived in Manhattan for almost 10 years. Certainly it's not for everybody, but it gets a lot better once you make enough money to live comfortably and save money. For me, this was after a few years in the business (age 24).

80% is too high. DC is a big target as well; NYC wasn't the only target on 9/11.

I've met a bunch of people who commute in from New Jersey and call themselves New Yorkers, LOL.

Since you don't like NYC, where would you prefer to be?

These are difficult to pull off while you're still working (which is why I'm still here), but Miami or Austin would be ideal. Maybe some small mountain town with a lake, like Tahoe or Coeur d'Alene.

Denver yo. It's a great city if you can put up with 3 blizzards in April. Also, it's a small finance city, but there are definitely jobs in the industry here.

"You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer
"Your grammar made me wish I'd been aborted." -happypantsmcgee

4/30/13
4/30/13

How can so many people disrespect the center of the cosmo?

I'm just a humble clown. I juggle around just for a good laugh of yours.

In reply to SirTradesaLot
5/1/13

SirTradesaLot:

These are difficult to pull off while you're still working (which is why I'm still here), but Miami or Austin would be ideal. Maybe some small mountain town with a lake, like Tahoe or Coeur d'Alene.

Come on Sir! Surely as a one of the founding partners your firm should feel obligated to grant you the freedom to work from wherever you want. So long as you are always reachable (easily accomplished nowadays with cellphone and wifi), make good on your PnL/being productive and able to travel whenever and wherever they need you, I don't see why they must keep you in the office every day.

I am not quite a partner yet (getting there soon hopefully) but the managing partners made it clear to me a while ago that I can work from anywhere I wanted, subject to the above conditions.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

5/1/13

The one thing I don't understand about NYC jobs is that why isn't the salary actually adjusted to account for cost of living. There is a slight adjustment for analyst between Houston and NYC for most of the BBs, nowhere enough to actually adjust for the difference in living expenses.

In reply to TeddyTheBear
5/1/13

TeddyTheBear:

The one thing I don't understand about NYC jobs is that why isn't the salary actually adjusted to account for cost of living. There is a slight adjustment for analyst between Houston and NYC for most of the BBs, nowhere enough to actually adjust for the difference in living expenses.

Why would there be an adjustment if people are willing to work for less? The reality is that most finance hopefuls want to be in NY (for the opportunities, prestige, centrality - whatever), so they are willing to take the downgrade in lifestyle.

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

In reply to ecuaman
5/1/13

ecuaman:

NYC in your early to mid 20s is an amazing place to be single, especially a single guy given the skewed gener ratio. However, later on, the city becomes a grind. At most firms across industries from my representative sample of friends, you'll work longer hours in NYC. Not sure what it is, but in other cities, maybe people have families, have other things going on in their lives, and just don't do face time at work like in NYC. In addition, you'll earn pretty much comparable salaries across cities, but the expenses greatly outpace any marginal salary differences. And, carrying groceries flights of stairs, overpriced bars, etc. I love to visit, but glad I don't live there anymore.

The gender ratio really doesn't have any effect on who's getting laid and who's not getting laid.

Also, if you like it in your early 20s, you'll probably lose your fucking mind when you hit 30.

In reply to NorthSider
5/1/13

NorthSider:

As always, capitalism works.

This is exactly what I took from this thread.

"For I am a sinner in the hands of an angry God. Bloody Mary full of vodka, blessed are you among cocktails. Pray for me now and at the hour of my death, which I hope is soon. Amen."

5/3/13

I came here 4 years ago for college and I've got to say I'm in love with the city. I'm from a small (100,000 person) city in Pennsylvania, and I never liked the rural-ness of it at all.

My parents met in NYC and we always took trips here as I was growing up, so early in life I made it my mission to do something great in the city.

We'll, like I've said, I've been here for 4 years and am about to start working full time in a few months, and I can honestly say I'll probably be here for the rest of my life. Sure I may move to Long Island or Connecticut eventually, but that is a looong way off.

It's the convenience, the sense of pride that if "I've made it here; I can make it anywhere," the business/chaotic-ness of a 24 hour city that I love. It's definitely not for all (most?) people, but if you're personality meshes with the city you can't live anywhere else. I've also got to say that most people don't love it for many years (even more than 4,) and it's definitely a learning curve and a love/hate relationship for a while.

If you wake up at a different time, in a different place, could you wake up as a different person?

5/3/13
5/4/13
5/4/13

NY is gr8. Its gotta be my favorite city in the world for a reason.

5/4/13

The simple reason most people don't like New York is that they don't have deep enough pockets. NYC is very expensive, a decent apartment (2000+ square feet in a good Manhattan neighborhood) is in the mid 7 figures. If you are making 7 figures there is nowhere better in the world than NY. If you're making 500k then you would be much better off in someplace like Houston.

5/4/13

If I never step foot in that city again, my life will be better. Trash piled shoulder high every morning, crowded with very rude people, bums, overpriced. Even when I'm just visiting I feel like I'm trapped in that disgusting place.

5/4/13
5/4/13

- You pay a relatively huge price to live in a shoebox.
- You can walk outside for 5 minutes and encounter a lot of filth.
- Too many people think their high rolling CEOs.
- Too many little d!cks try to act like ballers.
- Too many fake girls and those w/ a sense of entitlement
- This is the first year the Knicks haven't disappointed me in a decade.
- Hipsters from Brooklyn
- Too many liberals, not enough fiscal conservatives

In reply to SirTradesaLot
5/4/13

SirTradesaLot:

I'll give you a few reasons:

- cost of living
- crowded
- terrorism
- hurricanes
- douche bags everywhere
- too hot in summer
- too cold in winter
- it rains more here than in Seattle
- dirty as shit
- bums
- obsession with money
- Mark Sanchez
- horrible place to raise kids (even in the suburbs)

What else you got? I'll probably hate that too.

-smells like shit
-too many white people
-too many black people
-too many fucking people
-hipsters
-state income tax sucks cock (not as bad as cali)
-the knicks
-the jets
-the mets
-michael bloomberg

edit: or just watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeMgs3yqNzs (you knew it was coming eventually, didnt you?)

I hate victims who respect their executioners

In reply to guyfromct
5/4/13

futurectdoc:

The simple reason most people don't like New York is that they don't have deep enough pockets. NYC is very expensive, a decent apartment (2000+ square feet in a good Manhattan neighborhood) is in the mid 7 figures. If you are making 7 figures there is nowhere better in the world than NY. If you're making 500k then you would be much better off in someplace like Houston.

this is so fucking wrong

I hate victims who respect their executioners

5/4/13

Complaining about cost of living in NYC? Try Zurich, then you will know what "expenses" are.

5/4/13

why doesn't anyone like NYC? because it's filled with [insert ethnic group here]!!!

Money Never Sleeps? More like Money Never SUCKS amirite?!?!?!?

In reply to BlackHat
5/4/13

BlackHat:

futurectdoc:

The simple reason most people don't like New York is that they don't have deep enough pockets. NYC is very expensive, a decent apartment (2000+ square feet in a good Manhattan neighborhood) is in the mid 7 figures. If you are making 7 figures there is nowhere better in the world than NY. If you're making 500k then you would be much better off in someplace like Houston.

this is so fucking wrong

Yea, a well-off HOUSEHOLD makes about ~$350k a year. The above poster is grossly overestimating how many individuals rake in 7-figure salaries... and most of those that do make the $ from operating their own businesses.

Some people are completely out of touch of reality on how few people, relative to the total population, on Wall Street make 7-figure salaries.

In reply to BlackHat
5/4/13

BlackHat:

edit: or just watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeMgs3yqNzs (you knew it was coming eventually, didnt you?)

Was waiting for that...

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

5/4/13

Should I go to NYC this summer?? This is a question...

The Auto Show

5/4/13

Wow I am seriously reconsidering a possible move to NYC now.

In reply to guyfromct
5/4/13

futurectdoc:

The simple reason most people don't like New York is that they don't have deep enough pockets. NYC is very expensive, a decent apartment (2000+ square feet in a good Manhattan neighborhood) is in the mid 7 figures. If you are making 7 figures there is nowhere better in the world than NY. If you're making 500k then you would be much better off in someplace like Houston.

That's exactly right, couldn't have said it better--if only everyone else realized this. Once you accumulate 7+ figures, the streets no longer smell like George Costanza's taint and the depraved, rabid lunatics that typically inhabit the waste-ridden streets decide they would like to simply give you your privacy. And perceived threats of terrorism? Spare me! Terrorism only affects the poors.

I also couldn't agree more with your hypothesis that anyone making a half-million dollars should automatically be relegated to Houston. That way, we can keep all the poors in Texas while we 1%ers can enjoy our gang and hipster-free NYC neighborhoods. "Sanchez" is a little poor sounding to me but I'm his biggest fan anyways.

5/4/13

NYC was a great, quirky city. Unfortunately much of its quirkiness has been washed away, sanitized and disneyfied. These days much of Manhattan consists of nothing more than an endless display of sports bars, designer stores and restaurants. It is like an expanded version of the Las Vegas Strip without the benefit of open alcohol containers. Lower East Side is arguably the only part of Manhattan that still retains the charms and characteristics of what the village used to be like but even there things have been changing with long standing joints closing down and being replaced by generic luxury hotels and condos. And the same thing has been happening in Brooklyn too. Williamsburg nowadays looks like a clone of West Village and the creative types that helped build the neighborhood are mostly gone.

NYC is still a fantastic place to visit (just like Las Vegas) but no longer such an interesting place to live, even for those who can comfortably afford to live here. To me, cities like Philly and Chicago remind me of what NYC used to be like and indeed, many of the artsy and creative types that used to live here have transplanted there and took the quirkiness and charm along with them. I too, shall follow their footsteps as soon as I wrap up the projects i have been working on.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

5/5/13

If it weren't for the opportunities, there's no way I would still live here. I came from a suburb and hopefully move out after my initial stint in finance. This city is definitely not like a college town, unless you maybe went to Amherst or some other LAC. People here tend to act like zombies. Eye contact and acknowledgement are usually not returned.

Subways all have a unique, but equally appalling shitty smell.
The 4/5 train during rush hour
Price has been mentioned, but its a major turnoff. Micky D's doesn't even have a dolla menu here.If you're not a baller and you're careful with money, you can't really do shit that's unique to NYC (shopping, restaurants, arts).
Too many hipsters who think they are going to start a revolution
Outdoor activities are realistically impossible here.
Tourists who walk 4 wide on the sidewalk and randomly stop
This city serves 3 distinct groups of people that naturally don't mesh well: tourists, hipsters, and professionals.

In reply to brandon st randy
5/5/13

brandon st randy:

NYC was a great, quirky city. Unfortunately much of its quirkiness has been washed away, sanitized and disneyfied. These days much of Manhattan consists of nothing more than an endless display of sports bars, designer stores and restaurants. It is like an expanded version of the Las Vegas Strip without the benefit of open alcohol containers. Lower East Side is arguably the only part of Manhattan that still retains the charms and characteristics of what the village used to be like but even there things have been changing with long standing joints closing down and being replaced by generic luxury hotels and condos. And the same thing has been happening in Brooklyn too. Williamsburg nowadays looks like a clone of West Village and the creative types that helped build the neighborhood are mostly gone.

NYC is still a fantastic place to visit (just like Las Vegas) but no longer such an interesting place to live, even for those who can comfortably afford to live here. To me, cities like Philly and Chicago remind me of what NYC used to be like and indeed, many of the artsy and creative types that used to live here have transplanted there and took the quirkiness and charm along with them. I too, shall follow their footsteps as soon as I wrap up the projects i have been working on.

lol ok, hipster

5/5/13

Have been visiting NYC several times. It's an awesome (probably the best) city to visit, there's plenty of stuff to do and see and it never gets boring. But after a few days I just want to leave again. It's just too crowded.. You don't have the time to take a nice picture because several people will bump into you, everyone is in a hurry, it's dirty as shit and the subway is a joke.

I prefer SF, London, Munich, Zurich or Stockholm, but I can still see why people here love NYC. It's a fascinating city with an awesome nightlife and plenty of things to discover, it's just not for everyone.

In reply to above_and_beyond
5/5/13

above_and_beyond:
It's an awesome (probably the best) city to visit, there's plenty of stuff to do and see and it never gets boring. But after a few days I just want to leave again.

Nailed it.

In reply to prospie
5/5/13

prospie:

Wal-Mart kicks ass, actually. All you Wal-Mart haters can SUCK it.

Agreed. Show me another store where you can walk in at 3am and buy groceries for the week with the same amount of money you nycers spend on food for a day.

In reply to carreragt
5/5/13

carreragt:

This city serves 3 distinct groups of people that naturally don't mesh well: tourists, hipsters, and professionals.


Agreed. The funny thing is that in other cities like Chicago or Philly the artists and yuppies get along just fine and hang out at the same joints, e.g. Stanley Kitchen n Pub at Lincoln Park in Chicago. There is something about NYC that fosters apathy and discourages interactions with others outside one's clique. There may be 10,000 sports bars and 10,000 piano bars in NYC but there is not a single venue that combines the 2. And then there is the conspicuous absence of a country music scene in the city, with the exception of a few venues here and there.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

5/5/13

I wonder how many kids on here claiming the array of shits to do in the city actually even do a sliver of those said activities.

In reply to shingge
5/5/13

shingge:

I wonder how many kids on here claiming the array of shits to do in the city actually even do a sliver of those said activities.

Exactly. The city seems awesome to them because they're stuck in a cubicle night and day and anything seems better than that..

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

In reply to SirTradesaLot
5/5/13

SirTradesaLot:

shingge:

I wonder how many kids on here claiming the array of shits to do in the city actually even do a sliver of those said activities.

Exactly. The city seems awesome to them because they're stuck in a cubicle night and day and anything seems better than that..

It definitely requires effort to make sure you take advantage of the things that are available. I try to do a minimum of one interesting thing a week: go to a restaurant or bar I haven't been to, see some music, go to a gallery, see some comedy, see a live reading at a bookstore, etc. There are probably more options in NY than anywhere else.

It's very easy to fall into the trap of going home and collapsing on the couch everyday after work and then going to the same bar a block from my apartment every weekend, especially in the winter. But 9 out of 10 times when I make myself go do something I'm glad I did it.

New York seems like a miserable place to raise kids though.

In reply to Edmundo Braverman
5/6/13

You missed the biggest one

- Tourists

In reply to brandon st randy
5/6/13

brandon st randy:

NYC was a great, quirky city. Unfortunately much of its quirkiness has been washed away, sanitized and disneyfied. These days much of Manhattan consists of nothing more than an endless display of sports bars, designer stores and restaurants. It is like an expanded version of the Las Vegas Strip without the benefit of open alcohol containers. Lower East Side is arguably the only part of Manhattan that still retains the charms and characteristics of what the village used to be like but even there things have been changing with long standing joints closing down and being replaced by generic luxury hotels and condos. And the same thing has been happening in Brooklyn too. Williamsburg nowadays looks like a clone of West Village and the creative types that helped build the neighborhood are mostly gone.

NYC is still a fantastic place to visit (just like Las Vegas) but no longer such an interesting place to live, even for those who can comfortably afford to live here. To me, cities like Philly and Chicago remind me of what NYC used to be like and indeed, many of the artsy and creative types that used to live here have transplanted there and took the quirkiness and charm along with them. I too, shall follow their footsteps as soon as I wrap up the projects i have been working on.

But...but what about Arlene's? \m/ \m/

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

In reply to In The Flesh
5/7/13

In The Flesh:

brandon st randy:

NYC was a great, quirky city. Unfortunately much of its quirkiness has been washed away, sanitized and disneyfied. These days much of Manhattan consists of nothing more than an endless display of sports bars, designer stores and restaurants. It is like an expanded version of the Las Vegas Strip without the benefit of open alcohol containers. Lower East Side is arguably the only part of Manhattan that still retains the charms and characteristics of what the village used to be like but even there things have been changing with long standing joints closing down and being replaced by generic luxury hotels and condos. And the same thing has been happening in Brooklyn too. Williamsburg nowadays looks like a clone of West Village and the creative types that helped build the neighborhood are mostly gone.

NYC is still a fantastic place to visit (just like Las Vegas) but no longer such an interesting place to live, even for those who can comfortably afford to live here. To me, cities like Philly and Chicago remind me of what NYC used to be like and indeed, many of the artsy and creative types that used to live here have transplanted there and took the quirkiness and charm along with them. I too, shall follow their footsteps as soon as I wrap up the projects i have been working on.

But...but what about Arlene's? \m/ \m/

Please refer back to my reference to the LES. Arlenes is the only reason I have not (yet) skipped this God forsaken town.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

5/19/13

I hate when people don't specify Borough. NYC doesn't always = Manhattan. And to the starting family thing, uh hello Westchester County. Even parts of NJ are family towns. Having lived in both Orlando and NY, tourists fill same ratio of population in Orlando as in NYC. Every area/city has its advantages! The trash and people is what makes Manhattan and other Boroughs great...if that makes sense. West coast of Florida is great too in its own right. Capitalism is a wonderful thing...

5/20/13

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Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

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5/20/13
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11/25/13

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

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