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Currently an analyst at a top sweatshop group (GS TMT/MS M&A/Lazard/MoCo LA), just finished my 9th week in a row of 95 -140 hour weeks. Having trouble dealing with the hours.

It was a lot easier coping during my internship/fall because there was an end to the internship/fun events and in the fall there was Thanksgiving and Christmas. There is no end in sight right now, and I am having trouble thinking I can keep this pace up for the next 15 weeks til the interns get here. I keep telling myself the hours will ease up next year (second years have it better), but it is still a struggle.

I find myself turning more and more to alcohol to reduce the stress (tequila) , but in the long term it only does more damage (not as restful when I wake up). Given my compressed time frame it is mostly binge drinking in the 30-45 minutes I sometimes have before I fall asleep. If it wasn't for the trains in this city I would probably have a DUI or five.

Any advice? I keep looking at my bank account / reduction in my college loan balance, but it only goes so far. None of my friends at other banks have it this rough (seems like I am the exception, not the norm).

I know people will say there are a ton of other people willing to take my job, but I highly doubt many people could actually cope with this (we already had a Wharton/Harvard analyst with a 4.0 GPA drop out), so please save me that comment.

*Update*
Spoke to my staffer after an allnighter on Monday, basically said to buck up and shut up, so I guess that's what I will be doing. He described one of his experiences back in Iraq which gave me a new perspective on things. I am not getting shot at, have a shower, toilet and good food (plus getting paid 3x more than many people who do not have these amenities). 15+ more weeks is worth the wait.

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Comments (119)

  • kidflash's picture

    only a junior, so i know my advice might be absolutely useless, but have you thought about leaving early to whatever next step of your career?

  • ContemplatingBanker's picture

    My hobbies include making powerpoint presentations, excel models, buyers logs, and correcting my associates mistakes, so I think I have that front covered.

  • oppcostofcapital's picture

    you've gotta speak up and let people know what's going on if you really can't handle it to see if you can get even a little more slack. otherwise, it's all about staying positive. it's very tough to do but you can do it. it's been done many times before -- and as long as you can handle it physically you can def train your mind to handle it mentally. the 1st year is hard because you're not as efficient in your first year. you'll get there. I'd try to cut out or ease up on the alcohol -- that can mess up what sleep you do get which has huge ripple effects given your days. understand that you made a commitment and do the best you can. you can definitely do this -- esp if you have survived this long. it's already march. summers get there in just a few months. this stretch of time is one of the toughest but if you get through it it's all downhill -- not a quick downhill, but you just get better and quicker and more efficient.

  • oppcostofcapital's picture

    people have been doing this job for years -- decades even. and in the old days they didn't have programs like CIQ / FactSet. Data rooms were actual rooms. Take some comfort in that.

  • TechBanking's picture

    1. Keep your head up; 2 years is actually a short period of time, although the finish line looks very far away to you right now.
    2. Take some small breaks here and there to just get out of the office and take a walk - it will actually make you more efficient and help clear your head.
    3. Realize that most analysts go through some bad cycles - your friends may look to have it easier now, but their time will come. I had a brutal 3-4 month stretch as a second year.
    4. Think critically about your daily schedule. Where are you wasting time? Are there any things that you can cut out? Is there daily time consuming work that is not deal related? Are there other ways that you can be more efficient in completing your work product? I realize that most of your productivity/work flow is outside of your control.
    4. If you are getting >110 hrs/week regularly, then maybe talk to your staffer. Are all of the other analysts in your group working the same hours? Can you leverage resources from other groups/cross-staffed deal teams?

  • Latrell Sprewell CFA's picture

    College student, so at this point I can't really imagine working 140 hours... How has your general health progressed from when you started?

  • DBCooper's picture

    What helped me is probably what you already know: water, vitamins (multi, D3, Fish Oil, and B-complex minimum), cut out/back the booze. Try melatonin or if you're really frazzled Benadryl, it is a mild sedative. I used to do HIIT training (sprints) twice a week, so my body didn't go to total shit. If I wasn't working I slept or was relaxing. You get through it, hang in there.

    Please don't quote Patrick Bateman.

  • In reply to DBCooper
    rcm's picture

    DBCooper:
    What helped me is probably what you already know: water, vitamins (multi, D3, Fish Oil, and B-complex minimum), cut out/back the booze. Try melatonin or if you're really frazzled Benadryl, it is a mild sedative. I used to do HIIT training (sprints) twice a week, so my body didn't go to total shit. If I wasn't working I slept or was relaxing. You get through it, hang in there.

    Don't take Benadryl to make you go to sleep. You'll most likely wake up feeling like shit.

  • Bruce.Wayne's picture

    I think you should just realize that in the long run you'll look back on these days and realize how short the 'pain' was relative to everything else in your life. I mean yeah, during the stint, 2 years might be a long time, but I would just continuously remind yourself that when you're 60-70 one day you can either look back on this time of your life and regret not pushing through or 2) be happy you disciplined yourself and maintained a positive attitude.

    Either way, what the fuck do I know - I'm just a college student, but this exact mindset is what got me through some of my roughest times in the Military, so I guess it can sort of be applied here.

  • In reply to rcm
    DBCooper's picture

    rcm:
    DBCooper:
    What helped me is probably what you already know: water, vitamins (multi, D3, Fish Oil, and B-complex minimum), cut out/back the booze. Try melatonin or if you're really frazzled Benadryl, it is a mild sedative. I used to do HIIT training (sprints) twice a week, so my body didn't go to total shit. If I wasn't working I slept or was relaxing. You get through it, hang in there.

    Don't take Benadryl to make you go to sleep. You'll most likely wake up feeling like shit.

    Benadryl is the active sleep ingredient in Tylenol PM.

    Please don't quote Patrick Bateman.

  • bIastoise's picture

    just think about the fact that as long as you can take this for 2 years, you have a solid chance of moving to a PE associate role at Apollo, Cerberus, KKR, or some other top fund

  • In reply to DBCooper
    rcm's picture

    DBCooper:
    rcm:
    DBCooper:
    What helped me is probably what you already know: water, vitamins (multi, D3, Fish Oil, and B-complex minimum), cut out/back the booze. Try melatonin or if you're really frazzled Benadryl, it is a mild sedative. I used to do HIIT training (sprints) twice a week, so my body didn't go to total shit. If I wasn't working I slept or was relaxing. You get through it, hang in there.

    Don't take Benadryl to make you go to sleep. You'll most likely wake up feeling like shit.

    Benadryl is the active sleep ingredient in Tylenol PM.

    Don't take Tylenol PM to make you go to sleep. You'll most likely wake up feeling like shit.

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  • rpc's picture

    Only in college so take it for what it's worth (not much to you) but try to work out. Your situation sounds brutal but having my physical health go downhill would push me over the top.

  • In reply to bIastoise
    LiamNeeson's picture

    bIastoise:
    just think about the fact that as long as you can take this for 2 years, you have a solid chance of moving to a PE associate role at Apollo, Cerberus, KKR, or some other top fund

    That's probably exactly what he needs. A prospect of working (almost) the same hours for another 2 years ;-)

  • Bearearns's picture

    Here is an idea. Ask the second year that you are friendly with to give you some advice as to how they made it through.

  • OMS's picture

    first step. get the fuck off WSO. take a 20 minute nap instead.

  • yeahright's picture

    start giving 0 ****s and just leave earlier

    Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

  • DaisukiDaYo's picture

    I find taking 15-20 minute power naps really helpful. Stresswise, it's good to get an ergonomic foot pillow, and have lots of things at work that remind you of something else (pictures, green things, stress toys, etc). In the end, it's the little things that get you through the day.

    The foot pillow really helps, trust me :)

  • rufiolove's picture

    ContemplatingBanker:
    Currently an analyst at a top sweatshop group (GS TMT/MS M&A/Lazard/MoCo LA), just finished my 9th week in a row of 95 -140 hour weeks. Having trouble dealing with the hours.

    It was a lot easier coping during my internship/fall because there was an end to the internship/fun events and in the fall there was Thanksgiving and Christmas. There is no end in sight right now, and I am having trouble thinking I can keep this pace up for the next 15 weeks til the interns get here. I keep telling myself the hours will ease up next year (second years have it better), but it is still a struggle.

    I find myself turning more and more to alcohol to reduce the stress, but in the long term it only does more damage (not as restful when I wake up). Given my compressed time frame it is mostly binge drinking in the 30-45 minutes I sometimes have before I fall asleep.

    Any advice? I keep looking at my bank account / reduction in my college loan balance, but it only goes so far. None of my friends at other banks have it this rough (seems like I am the exception, not the norm).

    I know people will say there are a ton of other people willing to take my job, but I highly doubt many people could actually cope with this (we already had a Wharton/Harvard analyst with a 4.0 GPA drop out), so please save me that comment.

    I've been there dude... Not at the 140 end (I think I personally only know of maybe 2 guys who have hit 138, but I've hit 130 a couple of times and have had stretches of 100+ for 3 months at a time and I can honestly say that I wouldn't wish it on anyone. All I can say is that I feel your pain and that you just need to do whatever you need to do. I've done the booze thing and agree that you are just more exhausted and then jittery (hands get shaky, you're hungover and just feel like death). If you've had a couple of especially insane weeks back to back, I would reach out to your staffer and sit down for a convo and just try to see what he sees coming down the pipe and if there is any way you get get a bit of sleep or a lighter week. Sometimes this is fruitless, but they are human as well and they can realize when they are breaking someone down to the point where they can't function. If it's getting that bad you would be amazed how just getting a Saturday off from the office and just sleeping for like 12 hours will help.

    I will say that it gets better. Keep your head up and try to get a bit of perspective... Times will come when you are going to have to miss a deadline or "disappoint someone" but you just have to let it go, if you don't you are going to end up with health problems due to the stress. At the end of the day, these people don't own you, and you don't have to prove anything to the try hard kids on these forums that think they could replace you and can handle the hours. I know the hours suck, I've lived them, but just know that if you need to push back on things or get some sleep it isn't the end of the world as long as you are smart and tactful about it and don't come across as insubordinate. They need you even if they don't want to admit it.

  • In reply to chi312
    rufiolove's picture

    chi312:
    I would suggest anything but alcohol. Try and find a hobby.

    Lol good one. A hobby with the 5-6 hours you have away from work that also have to encompass sleeping, showering, shaving and getting back into the office.

  • In reply to TechBanking
    rufiolove's picture

    TechBanking:
    1. Keep your head up; 2 years is actually a short period of time, although the finish line looks very far away to you right now.
    2. Take some small breaks here and there to just get out of the office and take a walk - it will actually make you more efficient and help clear your head.
    3. Realize that most analysts go through some bad cycles - your friends may look to have it easier now, but their time will come. I had a brutal 3-4 month stretch as a second year.
    4. Think critically about your daily schedule. Where are you wasting time? Are there any things that you can cut out? Is there daily time consuming work that is not deal related? Are there other ways that you can be more efficient in completing your work product? I realize that most of your productivity/work flow is outside of your control.
    4. If you are getting >110 hrs/week regularly, then maybe talk to your staffer. Are all of the other analysts in your group working the same hours? Can you leverage resources from other groups/cross-staffed deal teams?

    OP- The above are also really good suggestions. I know that a lot of times I will hit a mental and physical wall around 2AM, sometimes earlier or later depending on the day. When that happens, I like to walk to a cafe or bodega and grab a coffee or tea, not so much for the caffeine but to remove myself from the office and break up the monotony and get some fresh air. A hot beverage also helps, that or really cold water.. the extremes just engage your senses and jolt you into a more alert state.

    Regarding evaluating your daily schedule see if there are things that you could be utilizing your DTP teams for. If you have table pages or things that look as though they will take substantial time to format, shoot that to DTP while you work on the model or valuation outputs, that way you aren't opening yourself up to bottlenecks unnecessarily. Obviously, as TB and you know, the hierarchy creates bottlenecks on its own but you can also use those to your advantage. While you are waiting on draft comments, you can sometimes sneak away and catch a quick nap in a secluded spot if you're especially exhausted... take your BB with you and leave the sound on and set multiple alarms. This is generally reasonable during weeks when you are living at the office. No one is really going to be able to come flip out at you if you've worked 36 hours straight and you pop off to a secluded conference room on another floor for a 1 hour nap, especially if you aren't going to be getting comments for a while.

    I agree with talking to your staffer as I mentioned in my other post. If you are getting blown up more than other analysts, it's probably a sign that you are performing well, because the most efficient analysts often tend to get the most work because people think you can handle it. You should attempt to build trust with your staffer that goes 2 ways. This makes honest dialogue much easier.

  • In reply to rufiolove
    oreos's picture

    rufiolove:

    such an asset to this site.

    "After you work on Wall Street it's a choice, would you rather work at McDonalds or on the sell-side? I would choose McDonalds over the sell-side." - David Tepper

  • Bullet-Tooth Tony's picture

    Why booze? You sound tired enough that you can just pass out. Either switch to weed (no hangover and better sleep IMO) or coke (to get you through the day).

  • State of Trance's picture

    We have all been there having worked in this industry. When I was doing my analyst stint at a top tier BB I would always use the weekends to do something I really enjoyed. In my case it was being a DJ.

  • newfirstyear's picture

    Dont drink alcohol. Drink water/tea.

    Go to sleep AS soon as you can. and most importantly, talk to your staffer.

  • surferbarney's picture

    suck it up. Nobody is shooting at you and I doubt you are shtting in a wag bag while you overcome dysentery.

  • SenhorFinance's picture

    The idea of cutting back the alcohol and having stress toys is good, as are those to find a hobby, get into meditation, whatever. But by all means, hang on in there. If you ask people (successful ones and otherwise) if they regret any decisions, they will answer yes, and they will inevitably qualify those as decisions made under stress. The decision to quit because of 140-hour workweeks - or similar events e.g. culture clash with another team after M&A, a high-profile scandal just a few degrees of separation away, et caetera - tend to be psychologically relieving and socially lauded, but after a few years, inevitably prove to be short-sighted. You won't disappoint anyone but yourself, but that is the worst disappointment to live with.

  • DonVon's picture

    Some of these comments are kinda disappointing...I hope most people are joking when they tell you to suck it up.

    OP it looks like you're really struggling and I can understand that. I guess my advice would be two-fold: 1. keep your eye on the prize (whatever that may be -- PE, starting your own thing, or whatever); 2. if the going is getting really tough, look to do #1 sooner rather than later.

    Yes everyone on this site salivates over the firms & groups you've listed, and "many would kill for your spot", but also realize that you're a human being and you don't _have_ to do this. That's not to say that you should quit -- far from it -- but take solace in the fact that there is an end, and if you look for an exit sooner, you have control over when it happens for the most part.

    "An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
    - Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Check out my blog!

  • beezle's picture

    I know exactly how you feel (alright... maybe you have it a little worse than I did - I never hit 140 hours). My staffer always used to remind us that around this time is when bullpen morale was at its lowest (furthest point away from summer analysts, no holidays to look forward to, cold weather, a lot of pitching, etc.). It was brutal. The way we used to cope was (1) if you truly feel like the workload is unbalanced among the bullpen, have an honest conversation with your staffer to at least avoid getting staff on new work for the time being. A good staffer will appreciate your honesty and think about your conversation the next time a pitch/deal comes through. (2) Since in our bullpen, the work was evenly distributed and it pretty much sucked for everyone, we spent our late nights bitching about how much work we had, fantasizing about what menial projects/tasks we would assign our incoming summer analysts, and how much we wanted to be on the buyside or quit altogether. Afterall, that's what bullpens are for - complaining and being miserable together. It didn't accomplish anything, but it sure made me feel better knowing someone else was suffering as well.

    I don't know what people are talking about re: getting a hobby. All I did during my few terrible months was work and take naps whenever I could fit it in. Also now would be a good time to cash in your good graces with your admins/assistants. Mine would bring me coffee in the morning or pastries because they started feeling sorry for us.

    Just know that these hours aren't permanent. If they are starting to seem permanent and you can't handle it, wait until your summer analysts start alleviating your workload, and start recruiting.

  • In reply to DonVon
    DaisukiDaYo's picture

    DonVon:
    Some of these comments are kinda disappointing...I hope most people are joking when they tell you to suck it up.

    OP it looks like you're really struggling and I can understand that. I guess my advice would be two-fold: 1. keep your eye on the prize (whatever that may be -- PE, starting your own thing, or whatever); 2. if the going is getting really tough, look to do #1 sooner rather than later.

    Yes everyone on this site salivates over the firms & groups you've listed, and "many would kill for your spot", but also realize that you're a human being and you don't _have_ to do this. That's not to say that you should quit -- far from it -- but take solace in the fact that there is an end, and if you look for an exit sooner, you have control over when it happens for the most part.

    No offense, but aren't you telling him to basically suck it up/move on as well? TBH I think that's the best advice, suck it up or move on. I mean, it's not like we didn't know what we were getting ourselves into...or we did but the greed and "exit opps" made us dismiss the fact that we'd age faster than the president.

  • In reply to surferbarney
    rufiolove's picture

    surferbarney:
    suck it up. Nobody is shooting at you and I doubt you are shtting in a wag bag while you overcome dysentery.

    why are you even bothering to post on this thread?

  • In reply to DaisukiDaYo
    DonVon's picture

    DaisukiDaYo:
    DonVon:
    Some of these comments are kinda disappointing...I hope most people are joking when they tell you to suck it up.

    OP it looks like you're really struggling and I can understand that. I guess my advice would be two-fold: 1. keep your eye on the prize (whatever that may be -- PE, starting your own thing, or whatever); 2. if the going is getting really tough, look to do #1 sooner rather than later.

    Yes everyone on this site salivates over the firms & groups you've listed, and "many would kill for your spot", but also realize that you're a human being and you don't _have_ to do this. That's not to say that you should quit -- far from it -- but take solace in the fact that there is an end, and if you look for an exit sooner, you have control over when it happens for the most part.

    No offense, but aren't you telling him to basically suck it up/move on as well? TBH I think that's the best advice, suck it up or move on. I mean, it's not like we didn't know what we were getting ourselves into...or we did but the greed and "exit opps" made us dismiss the fact that we'd age faster than the president.


    I think there's a subtle difference between "suck it up lololololol" and advice that shows some understanding and empathy. Ultimately, yeah, the OP obviously has two options: work, not work. He's well-aware of this because he's not a dunce. But I think it's also difficult for him to process that on his own given the circumstances (completely understandable), which is why he came here for advice.

    "An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
    - Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Check out my blog!

  • milehigh's picture

    ContemplatingBanker:
    (we already had a Wharton/Harvard analyst with a 4.0 GPA drop out), so please save me that comment.

    Unfortunately, dealing with long hours is an intangible and so it doesn't really matter how intelligent you are. 95-140 hours is unreal though, and so what you do about the hours all depends on your goal down the road.

    It sounds like you're in a group primed for mega-fund placement and all the glory and prestige BS people spout about on here that comes with it. If your end goal is to be working at a mega-fund in 2 years, then you'd be best to suck it up and remember where that group is likely to take you. If not, lateral to another group with a better lifestyle/culture.

    FWIW, the fact you're posting this to begin with leads me to believe you'd be willing to work in a lesser group, for a better lifestyle. As for the comp, I doubt it will change by much if you switch to another top bank.

  • AndyLouis's picture

    ContemplatingBanker:
    95 -140 hour weeks.

    140? ouch.. that leaves you 28 hours the rest of the week to s/s/s/s/s, don't know how you do it

  • White Lion's picture

    Granted I've only done the 9 week stretch as an SA, but I never had weeks under 100, and most of the time was in the 120 range (two weeks over 130).

    I found that drinking tons of water throughout the day helped keep me going. Getting up to re-fill water bottles and take piss breaks (honestly 10+ times a day, they probably thought I had a prostate problem, or a coke issue) allows you to get up and move your legs and clear your mind even for just 2 minutes. Being super hydrated also helps with stamina and alertness. Combine this water intake with some serious vitamins (I'm talking 20x your daily recommended intake of every vitamin you've ever heard of, and plenty you haven't) and your body will be in tip-top shape even if you're not working out too much.

    On that note, I almost never got to work out and that really dragged on my well being. I found that playing a game of pingpong with another analyst before I went home (even at 3 or 4 am) really helped relax me. Another move I found that helped a lot was going for late night runs. On Friday and Saturday nights when we would be wrapping up work (between 10pm and 1am usually) I would often put on running clothes in the office and go for a run directly from work. The streets are much more empty at night and this helped me to sleep.

    Good luck to you.

  • esbanker's picture

    the hours you are putting in are inhuman.100 hr/weeks are tough. I can't imagine another 40 hours on top of that.

    Is it really worth it? Only you can answer that.

    Capitalist

  • target for life's picture

    Perspective

    1) With this role - you can transition to ANY other finance related role at ANY company as everyone knows you have the smarts, will & track record for it. No one will question you.

    2) The buyside. I assume by now you have already been contacted by headhunters. Even if you don't want to put it similar hours at BX, KKR & the like you can still go to other top MM & megafunds.

    3) Most important. THE MONEY! Think about how much you can make if you & your team performs well. Not just this year but in the future.
    130 - 150K first year out of college
    160 - 200K second year out
    Top Buyside 200 - 250 3rd year
    250+ 4th year

    Pretty boss & gives you the freedom to do just about anything you want in the world. The money is more than worth it, more useful than your health for a year.

    Go to a top M7 school if your heart desires, you can literally get whatever position you want, no one will say no t you.

    10 years from now you will look back and be like that was one of the best decisions I've ever made.

  • LBT's picture

    Quit and lateral. How do you get to 140 hours? I had plenty of weeks and all nighters as an analyst, but I can't figure out how on average you could literally be at work for an average of 20 hours per day for 7 days straight. Especially if you are doing 90-140 every week for over 2 months.

  • In reply to LBT
    target for life's picture

    LBT:
    Quit and lateral. How do you get to 140 hours? I had plenty of weeks and all nighters as an analyst, but I can't figure out how on average you could literally be at work for an average of 20 hours per day for 7 days straight. Especially if you are doing 90-140 every week for over 2 months.

    Top dogs got to put in top hours. It's only a year of his life with an incredibly low discount rate (lower the rate, higher the valuation). The payoff for things like this are huge. I think it would be worse if he quits & 10 years from now regrets the choice like I could have done XYZ if I just stuck it out.

    Year 2 might get better & SA's are just around the corner.

  • In reply to target for life
    DonVon's picture

    target for life:
    3) Most important. THE MONEY! Think about how much you can make if you & your team performs well. Not just this year but in the future.
    130 - 150K first year out of college
    160 - 200K second year out

    Top Buyside 200 - 250 3rd year
    250+ 4th year

    These figures sure seem realistic...

    "An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
    - Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Check out my blog!

  • In reply to target for life
    LBT's picture

    target for life:
    LBT:
    Quit and lateral. How do you get to 140 hours? I had plenty of weeks and all nighters as an analyst, but I can't figure out how on average you could literally be at work for an average of 20 hours per day for 7 days straight. Especially if you are doing 90-140 every week for over 2 months.

    Top dogs got to put in top hours. It's only a year of his life with an incredibly low discount rate (lower the rate, higher the valuation). The payoff for things like this are huge. I think it would be worse if he quits & 10 years from now regrets the choice like I could have done XYZ if I just stuck it out.

    Year 2 might get better & SA's are just around the corner.

    Well I don't agree that it is worth it for even a year, but I could be convinced otherwise. I am mostly interested in is something like CCTV footage of a 140 hour week. I will count taking a shit at the office as work, but at that high of a number I would guess the fatigue of working anywhere close to that gives way to some aggressive rounding.

  • In reply to DonVon
    target for life's picture

    DonVon:
    target for life:
    3) Most important. THE MONEY! Think about how much you can make if you & your team performs well. Not just this year but in the future.
    130 - 150K first year out of college
    160 - 200K second year out

    Top Buyside 200 - 250 3rd year
    250+ 4th year

    These figures sure seem realistic...

    Top group, top bucket, top firm - that's very realistic. Even with a slowing/recovering M&A market if your killing it at GS you will rake it in.

  • In reply to target for life
    duffmt6's picture

    target for life:
    DonVon:
    target for life:
    3) Most important. THE MONEY! Think about how much you can make if you & your team performs well. Not just this year but in the future.
    130 - 150K first year out of college
    160 - 200K second year out

    Top Buyside 200 - 250 3rd year
    250+ 4th year

    These figures sure seem realistic...

    Top group, top bucket, top firm - that's very realistic. Even with a slowing/recovering M&A market if your killing it at GS you will rake it in.

    All of your posts should come with the following disclaimer:

    "I am a prestige obsessed college (high school?) kid who has no idea what he is talking about."

    "For I am a sinner in the hands of an angry God. Bloody Mary full of vodka, blessed are you among cocktails. Pray for me now and at the hour of my death, which I hope is soon. Amen."

  • In reply to target for life
    DonVon's picture

    target for life:
    DonVon:
    target for life:
    3) Most important. THE MONEY! Think about how much you can make if you & your team performs well. Not just this year but in the future.
    130 - 150K first year out of college
    160 - 200K second year out

    Top Buyside 200 - 250 3rd year
    250+ 4th year

    These figures sure seem realistic...

    Top group, top bucket, top firm - that's very realistic. Even with a slowing/recovering M&A market if your killing it at GS you will rake it in.


    Have to agree with duff. Either that or you have the super insane prestigious inside information. Going with the former.

    "An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
    - Dwight D. Eisenhower

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  • In reply to target for life
    DonVon's picture

    target for life:
    LBT:
    Quit and lateral. How do you get to 140 hours? I had plenty of weeks and all nighters as an analyst, but I can't figure out how on average you could literally be at work for an average of 20 hours per day for 7 days straight. Especially if you are doing 90-140 every week for over 2 months.

    Top dogs got to put in top hours. It's only a year of his life with an incredibly low discount rate (lower the rate, higher the valuation). The payoff for things like this are huge.


    Also...shut up.

    "An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
    - Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Check out my blog!

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