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Just saw a freaking mouse walk leisurely in my $2,000 apartment!!!! this city is so god damn filthy. I walk around and it smells like dog piss everywhere, everyone is so rude, subways suck a**.....eh, that was me just venting, but I will probably live here for the next couple of years. Tomorrow I will just walk into a CVS while smelling the fresh piss and trash, buy some mouse traps and hope to catch the little sucker.

Good night!

2 1

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Comments (246)

  • Ambitious88's picture

    So, let's see.

    Cons of NYC:
    - Dirty
    - Expensive
    - Hot subways

    Pros of NYC:
    - Infrastructure/transportation
    - Things to do (restaurants, parks, bars, etc.)
    - Culture and diversity
    - Financial capital of America (and arguably the world)
    - Gorgeous women (if that appeals to you)
    - Bars are open until 4 AM
    - History/sights
    - Best dealflow for i-banking

    NYC isn't that bad of a place to live, assuming you follow similar criteria. Obviously it can get frustrating when waiting for the L train in 100+ degree heat. But it's definitely better than being stuck in the Yukon Territory or Helena, Montana.

    There are tradeoffs between all cities (and suburbs). Just do your homework beforehand so you know what you're getting yourself into.

  • geofinance's picture

    I love NYC, but lately have been questioning it.

    The number of homeless and inability or refusal of the city to deal with them has really gotten out of hand. To the point that I'm concerned about safety.

    Also gotta say that paying >$3k for an apartment in a nice neighborhood and constantly walking by the projects next door where the trash is overflowing with HDTV and xbox packing and people are just sitting around all day doesn't make me very happy either, but I feel like in the entitlement states of america you're going to have deal with that everywhere.

    All in all you have to realize some things are just outside your control, focus on what's important to you and let the rest go.

  • In reply to Ambitious88
    Malakari's picture

    Ambitious88:
    So, let's see.

    Cons of NYC:
    - Dirty
    - Expensive
    - Hot subways

    Pros of NYC:
    - Infrastructure/transportation
    - Things to do (restaurants, parks, bars, etc.)
    - Culture and diversity
    - Financial capital of America (and arguably the world)
    - Gorgeous women (if that appeals to you)
    - Bars are open until 4 AM
    - History/sights
    - Best dealflow for i-banking

    NYC isn't that bad of a place to live, assuming you follow similar criteria. Obviously it can get frustrating when waiting for the L train in 100+ degree heat. But it's definitely better than being stuck in the Yukon Territory or Helena, Montana.

    There are tradeoffs between all cities (and suburbs). Just do your homework beforehand so you know what you're getting yourself into.

    People always think NYC has the best dealflow, the best everything. As an analyst in NYC at a top BB and with many friends working elsewhere, its simply not true. What you want to do might not be the best in NYC. For example for Tech you go to palo alto or the west coast. Energy/Power you go to Houston. Industrials you go to Chicago. New york is so great that Goldamn put its TMT group out there right? And MS puts its healthcare there too right? Give me a break and stop jerking it to WSO. Ive met so many prospective monkeys so are so focused on NYC its stupid.

    Sure I love New York sometimes. The variety is awesome, there are smoking hot girls. But for every smoking hot girl I see I see 10 crackwhores. 5 screaming/crazy hobos. 5000 dirty ass lower class people who dont shower and are loud as shit.

    The subway is great! Except it takes fucking forever. And it always randomly stops. And its hot as shit. And it smells like shit. Ive never had acne in my life and Im starting to get some from dirty NYC.

    3G is slow as balls out here.

    There are tons of other things but Im far too lazy to type them out and Im going to enjoy my weekend. Is NY great? Sometimes. is it the best place to start out if you dont know what group you want to be in/what to do? Yes. Is it the end all be all? Hell no.

  • In reply to West Coast rainmaker
    RonBurgandy's picture

    West Coast rainmaker:
    New York is a marvel of civil engineering...but it is a shame that such infrastructure is necessary, and often inadequate.

    The subway is probably the best in the US, but still inconvenient when you think about it: it might take 40 minutes to get from Tribeca to the UES (4-5 miles). It just doesn't compare to driving. Of course, driving is nearly as slow and cost prohibitive in NYC. You only hear about how easy the commute is in NYC because most bankers live blocks from their offices. And the above comments about the subway being hot in the summer are dead on. I am surprised that (more) people don't get heat stroke down there from humidity and 100+ degree heat.

    The CoL is retarded. RE prices never really burst like they did in the rest of the country (don't mention Stuy Town). Everything else is priced at a premium too. Bankers are doubly screwed, since we can't exactly go all the way to Queens or Jersey to shop at a big box store.

    If you actually want to stay in NYC long term, you are going to need to figure in the cost of at least 4 years of private school (50k/year) for your kid...not that I would particularly want my kid to grow up in the city.

    SF, LA, Boston, Chicago, Miami, and even Houston are all expensive relative to middle America. But they are nothing compared to NYC. You can get a better quality of life for far less cash. Yea, you might only have 1 Ethiopian restaurant in Houston, and you might not have a museum as famous as the Met. But what does that matter when you are working 100+ hours per week?

    For me, I care about: weather, nightlife (to a limited extent, and CoL. New York falls short on all three metrics. I am just holding out for a megafund / BB to open a Santa Barbara office.

    What you're describing is really a product of living in any very large, congested city. Compare NYC to Lagos, Seoul, Cairo, Calcutta, or Mumbai. You want to talk about traffic jams?! NYC does not even come close!

    My point is, it's very difficult to compare NY to these other American cities when NY is far more populous, and more importantly, far more densely populated. And BTW, the subways are air conditioned. Sucks to wait on the platform in a suit in 100 degree weather, but once you're on the train, it's nothing.

  • Ambition's picture

    ok well I love LA, but I also like the rush of NYC and the CoL in Chii-town. ugh so many choices..

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • analystonsmack's picture

    The only people who hate NYC are those that believe that NYC is the Island of Manhattan. They're usually either transplants from other states, Staten Island, or non NYC NY'ers.

    Take it from someone who grew up in Brooklyn. The City (Manhattan) is detached from the rest of NYC.That wasn't the case but in the last 15 years it's changed a lot. It changed for the better in terms of cleanliness, wealth, housing, high wage employment, etc. but its lost that NYC edge.

    If you want a taste of the real NYC, Manhattan isn't it anymore.

  • RKBanker's picture

    If you guys ever get a chance, Hong Kong is definitely a place that you want to experience. Very diverse, not just asians, but a mix of people from all over the world. You might say that's in every city, but it's even more evident in Hong Kong, in my opinion.

    The streets are very clean, and the A/C on full blast during the summer even in the subway stations, although it could get very cold in the winter since there is no central heat. If you want to go out, LKF and WanChai is the place. It's packed with people drinking and walking around. The people are nice and everything there is cheap except rent. Doesn't really matter if you can't speak the language. My buddy lives there all his life, and all he does is point.

  • Ambition's picture

    I would love hong kong banking too, but I cant speak mandarin or chinese

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • In reply to RKBanker
    Kanon's picture

    RKBanker:
    If you guys ever get a chance, Hong Kong is definitely a place that you want to experience. Very diverse, not just asians, but a mix of people from all over the world. You might say that's in every city, but it's even more evident in Hong Kong, in my opinion.

    The streets are very clean, and the A/C on full blast during the summer even in the subway stations, although it could get very cold in the winter since there is no central heat. If you want to go out, LKF and WanChai is the place. It's packed with people drinking and walking around. The people are nice and everything there is cheap except rent. Doesn't really matter if you can't speak the language. My buddy lives there all his life, and all he does is point.

    This.

    I will say streets aren't 'very clean' - as I mentioned earlier, there are some parts of the city that can be even dirtier than nyc, but it is otherwise cleaner overall (though neither city's all that clean...). But HK's public transit system is amazing (you can get anywhere and almost anything fast food and snack wise via the transit 'Octopus' card). And their subway stations and trains are immaculate - I have yet to witness a crazy person or a urine-soaked homeless terrorizing citizens in subways, or green-slime covering station walls whenever I visit, as I have seen in new york. The drawback is that they don't run 24/7, though the taxis and buses are cheap and plentiful in wee hours so that covers that.

    In terms of 'everything is cheap', HK is more 'affordable' to the lower class than say NYC, in that you can get a decent meal for a decent price (e.g., you can probably feed yourself lunch on $16-20 HKD... ~$3 USD, which can barely buy you a pizza slice in New York), but it's still a place of great wealth disparity. And rent as you mentioned is very high - ridiculous even. If you don't have the cash, you could end up here: http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/10/28/ca...

    The way I see it... HK is like an Asian version of New York, with crap-ton more malls, less broadway musicals, cleaner transportation, no baseball teams more soccer, and tropical weather.

  • JulianRobertson's picture

    It's a grass is greener thing. I'm on the west coast in a city with very good cost of living, very low crime, and things are pretty orderly. Tradeoff: job market flat out sucks here, not much nightlife, west coast finance hours (meaning waking up at 4:30 AM), and plenty of pretentious hipster types

    I wouldn't want to settle down in NYC, but I'd like to live there for a bit, especially while I'm young. Long run I'll probably end up in the South...went to school down there and love it.

  • Ambition's picture

    ^^^ LA or SF?? Or some other city I wouldnt think that the nightife in LA would suck or SF for that matter. Just wondering. Correct me if I am wrong.

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • In reply to Kanon
    ivoteforthatguy's picture

    Kanon:
    RKBanker:
    If you guys ever get a chance, Hong Kong is definitely a place that you want to experience. Very diverse, not just asians, but a mix of people from all over the world. You might say that's in every city, but it's even more evident in Hong Kong, in my opinion.

    The streets are very clean, and the A/C on full blast during the summer even in the subway stations, although it could get very cold in the winter since there is no central heat. If you want to go out, LKF and WanChai is the place. It's packed with people drinking and walking around. The people are nice and everything there is cheap except rent. Doesn't really matter if you can't speak the language. My buddy lives there all his life, and all he does is point.

    This.

    I will say streets aren't 'very clean' - as I mentioned earlier, there are some parts of the city that can be even dirtier than nyc, but it is otherwise cleaner overall (though neither city's all that clean...). But HK's public transit system is amazing (you can get anywhere and almost anything fast food and snack wise via the transit 'Octopus' card). And their subway stations and trains are immaculate - I have yet to witness a crazy person or a urine-soaked homeless terrorizing citizens in subways, or green-slime covering station walls whenever I visit, as I have seen in new york. The drawback is that they don't run 24/7, though the taxis and buses are cheap and plentiful in wee hours so that covers that.

    In terms of 'everything is cheap', HK is more 'affordable' to the lower class than say NYC, in that you can get a decent meal for a decent price (e.g., you can probably feed yourself lunch on $16-20 HKD... ~$3 USD, which can barely buy you a pizza slice in New York), but it's still a place of great wealth disparity. And rent as you mentioned is very high - ridiculous even. If you don't have the cash, you could end up here: http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/10/28/ca...

    The way I see it... HK is like an Asian version of New York, with crap-ton more malls, less broadway musicals, cleaner transportation, no baseball teams more soccer, and tropical weather.

    love it.

  • Ambition's picture

    like i said i would love HK but I can speak any of the native languages there

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • shorttheworld's picture

    For anyone who complains about the city being loud or not quiet then don't live in the fucking village or LES. Live on the ues or uws. Same for complaining about smells, I have a 2 bed 2.5 bath duplex with a Viking sub zero kitchen a block from Columbus circle and it's 3500 a month. Fuck a doorman. But yeah I def agree Texas is where it's at

  • In reply to shorttheworld
    awm55's picture

    shorttheworld:
    For anyone who complains about the city being loud or not quiet then don't live in the fucking village or LES. Live on the ues or uws. Same for complaining about smells, I have a 2 bed 2.5 bath duplex with a Viking sub zero kitchen a block from Columbus circle and it's 3500 a month. Fuck a doorman. But yeah I def agree Texas is where it's at

    The village is much quieter than the UES or UWS. The grid system up there makes it such that you are no more than a 2 min walk from a 4-6 lane highway.

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  • K3's picture

    moving back into nyc for my FT job and this time the firm isnt paying for the apt... fucking wonderful.

    Funny finds though:

    Picking out an apartment in June is WAYYYYYY better than finding one now, in August, because all the students/new hires/EVERYONE is sacking this housing market dry.

    I also closely monitored the prices per apartment and back in June you could have gotten a nice 1850 per month Alcove Studio in Hell's Kitchen, and now that option DOES NOT EXIST IN ANY WAY OR FORM!

    In August, shitty broker fee high season, you WILL NOT find what you want unless your paying out the ass and all those room/shared on craigslist are the most unappealing things I have ever seen in my life.

    Nyc has to do something about the finance pay grades.... how those Big4 accountants move into nyc with bases of 55k, I HAVE NO EFFING CLUE... I feel like as long as your under the 100k base, your fucked regardless.

    done with my vent.

    Oh by the way, Houston is definitely a pretty good spot to be, SHIT IS DIRT CHEAP HERE!!!! food is pretty good, the people are very laid back compared to nyc, but it would be an awesome save money move.

    .

  • In reply to K3
    analystonsmack's picture

    khara 3alekon:
    moving back into nyc for my FT job and this time the firm isnt paying for the apt... fucking wonderful.

    Funny finds though:

    Picking out an apartment in June is WAYYYYYY better than finding one now, in August, because all the students/new hires/EVERYONE is sacking this housing market dry.

    I also closely monitored the prices per apartment and back in June you could have gotten a nice 1850 per month Alcove Studio in Hell's Kitchen, and now that option DOES NOT EXIST IN ANY WAY OR FORM!

    In August, shitty broker fee high season, you WILL NOT find what you want unless your paying out the ass and all those room/shared on craigslist are the most unappealing things I have ever seen in my life.

    Nyc has to do something about the finance pay grades.... how those Big4 accountants move into nyc with bases of 55k, I HAVE NO EFFING CLUE... I feel like as long as your under the 100k base, your fucked regardless.

    done with my vent.

    Oh by the way, Houston is definitely a pretty good spot to be, SHIT IS DIRT CHEAP HERE!!!! food is pretty good, the people are very laid back compared to nyc, but it would be an awesome save money move.

    Roomates and living check to check. That's how they get by on 55k.

  • In reply to awm55
    RonBurgandy's picture

    awm55:
    The village is much quieter than the UES or UWS. The grid system up there makes it such that you are no more than a 2 min walk from a 4-6 lane highway.

    Depends on which part of the Village we're talking about. The EV is definitely louder than both the UES and the UWS. The WV is, for the most part, quieter. But in any of them, there are loud streets and there are quiet streets.

    You want quiet? Go to Brooklyn! Peaceful and serene...

  • seedy underbelly's picture

    NYC is the greatest city in the world. So, shut up.

    P.S: NYCbandar - Damn! lol you're living a pretty badass life, even by IBD standards. :D

  • In reply to Ambition
    JulianRobertson's picture

    Ambition:
    ^^^ LA or SF?? Or some other city I wouldnt think that the nightife in LA would suck or SF for that matter. Just wondering. Correct me if I am wrong.

    Not in California, I'm in the Northwest...PM me if you want more details

  • Bondarb's picture

    NYC is the only global city in America. Yes if you hang out with a bunch of bankers all day and go get drunk every night in crappy irish pubs in midtown then it will suck. Thats like saying you went to Tokyo and it sucks because they have a McDonalds which you hung out at the entire time. Not liking New York is a reflection of you, not the city. If you cant find a good time here then you are hopeless and you should leave...but please dont blame it on anybody but yourself.

  • sdumb's picture

    I saw some guy smoke crack on the 6 train last night (while it was moving). This was in midtown too. My biggest complaint about NYC (right now) is the lack of A/C, or any kind of temperature control, in the subway stations, especially Grand Central.

  • In reply to Bondarb
    awm55's picture

    Bondarb:
    NYC is the only global city in America. Yes if you hang out with a bunch of bankers all day and go get drunk every night in crappy irish pubs in midtown then it will suck. Thats like saying you went to Tokyo and it sucks because they have a McDonalds which you hung out at the entire time. Not liking New York is a reflection of you, not the city. If you cant find a good time here then you are hopeless and you should leave...but please dont blame it on anybody but yourself.

    I really disagree, NYC does not provide an opportunity to live in the heart of the city in a neighborhood that provides a decent quality of life. I grew up outside NYC and now live in London, the best neighborhoods in London are in the heart of the city but also provide a great quality of life. Most of them are quiet, clean, and very close to loads of green spaces. The only decent neighborhoods that are close to a park are the UES and UWS, both of which are plagued by the stupid grid system making it such that you are no more than a 2 min walk from a major road.

    Downtown is a great place to go out, but its cramped and not close to any parks.

  • RonBurgandy's picture

    There's Washington Square Park, Madison Square Park, or Tompkins Square Park downtown.

    Again, you have to think of NYC as more than just Manhattan. I know that's a difficult concept for most people (even for locals sometimes), as everyone associates 'The City' with Manhattan, but it's important. There's five boroughs here, and plenty for everyone. Okay, so maybe Park Slope or Astoria are not in the center of the city, as you said, but they are not exactly far from Midtown, either.

    NYC is unique in the sense that it's built around Manhattan, which is this long, slender, very densely populated island. Many people find living in Manhattan unbearable because of the density. So the alternative is the suburbs (LI, Westchester, NJ), or the outer boroughs.

  • In reply to RonBurgandy
    awm55's picture

    RonBurgandy:
    There's Washington Square Park, Madison Square Park, or Tompkins Square Park downtown.

    Again, you have to think of NYC as more than just Manhattan. I know that's a difficult concept for most people (even for locals sometimes), as everyone associates 'The City' with Manhattan, but it's important. There's five boroughs here, and plenty for everyone. Okay, so maybe Park Slope or Astoria are not in the center of the city, as you said, but they are not exactly far from Midtown, either.

    NYC is unique in the sense that it's built around Manhattan, which is this long, slender, very densely populated island. Many people find living in Manhattan unbearable because of the density. So the alternative is the suburbs (LI, Westchester, NJ), or the outer boroughs.

    The green spaces at those parks are the size of private gardens in London and the neighborhoods around those parks are busy as hell. I am really splitting hairs now, but unless you have lived in a city that provides everything in a single neighborhood its hard to understand.

  • trailmix8's picture

    I live in Tribeca and I love it.

  • In reply to trailmix8
    awm55's picture

    trailmix8:
    I live in Tribeca and I love it.

    Tribeca is great, I agree. But its not exactly green.

  • In reply to awm55
    RonBurgandy's picture

    awm55:
    The green spaces at those parks are the size of private gardens in London and the neighborhoods around those parks are busy as hell. I am really splitting hairs now, but unless you have lived in a city that provides everything in a single neighborhood its hard to understand.

    I hear what you're saying, London's green spaces are vast compared to NY's, and it's best neighborhoods have quiet, tree-lined streets that make you feel at home. It's hard to compare the two, because apart from The City, things are much more calm and serene in Central London.

    To be honest, I'd rather live in London, and would move in a heartbeat if I was offered a job there (spent 3 months there two years ago and loved it!) It's definitely a more livable city than most, especially for such a highly populated place. Just supporting the livability of NY in the process.

  • In reply to RonBurgandy
    awm55's picture

    RonBurgandy:
    awm55:
    The green spaces at those parks are the size of private gardens in London and the neighborhoods around those parks are busy as hell. I am really splitting hairs now, but unless you have lived in a city that provides everything in a single neighborhood its hard to understand.

    I hear what you're saying, London's green spaces are vast compared to NY's, and it's best neighborhoods have quiet, tree-lined streets that make you feel at home. It's hard to compare the two, because apart from The City, things are much more calm and serene in Central London.

    To be honest, I'd rather live in London, and would move in a heartbeat if I was offered a job there (spent 3 months there two years ago and loved it!) It's definitely a more livable city than most, especially for such a highly populated place. Just supporting the livability of NY in the process.

    Don't get me wrong, some neighborhoods in NYC are great. SoHo, Tribeca, West Village, etc ooze character and are genuinely nice neighborhoods. Hell I wouldn't mind living in the West Village at all.

  • Ambition's picture

    ^^ costs too much money

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • NuevoBanker's picture

    what I always wonder is how can people with a "normal" income like teachers, nurses, assistants afford to live in such an expensive city like London? Are they all living in shitty apartments or what?

  • Genetic's picture

    I don't think anyone mentioned how much the state/city of NY, NYC rapes you on your taxes. I had to do an NYC return for a client once and it was quite a headache. If i remember, the guy was paying half his salary away. That's practically theft and for what? it's apparent from the above posts that the city isn't doing enough with it

  • Genetic's picture

    I don't think anyone mentioned how much the state/city of NY, NYC rapes you on your taxes. I had to do an NYC return for a client once and it was quite a headache. If i remember, the guy was paying half his salary away. That's practically theft and for what? it's apparent from the above posts that the city isn't doing enough with it

  • Genetic's picture

    I don't think anyone mentioned how much the state/city of NY, NYC rapes you on your taxes. I had to do an NYC return for a client once and it was quite a headache. If i remember, the guy was paying half his salary away. That's practically theft and for what? it's apparent from the above posts that the city isn't doing enough with it

  • Genetic's picture

    I don't think anyone mentioned how much the state/city of NY, NYC rapes you on your taxes. I had to do an NYC return for a client once and it was quite a headache. If i remember, the guy was paying half his salary away. That's practically theft and for what? it's apparent from the above posts that the city isn't doing enough with it

  • In reply to NuevoBanker
    awm55's picture

    NuevoBanker:
    what I always wonder is how can people with a "normal" income like teachers, nurses, assistants afford to live in such an expensive city like London? Are they all living in shitty apartments or what?

    They don't live in central or they live in subsidized housing for key workers.

  • In reply to awm55
    UFOinsider's picture

    awm55:
    NuevoBanker:
    what I always wonder is how can people with a "normal" income like teachers, nurses, assistants afford to live in such an expensive city like London? Are they all living in shitty apartments or what?

    They don't live in central or they live in subsidized housing for key workers.


    Or they share an apartment, live in a shoe, or rent a room with common living space for $900

    Get busy living

  • technoviking's picture

    Yes, i just moved out of NYC after 4 years. Absolutely loved the place, despite its griminess. Recently moved to a european city for work. Having the time of my life, and just signed a lease in the city centre 3 minutes from work for a 4 floor, two bedroom apartment at 1100 euro a month. happy days!

  • Ambition's picture

    I love NYC but if I think about the analyst there are getting the worst deal of them all. I know an analyst in Mumbai that gets paid as much as he would in NYC (think BB IBD branch). I know there is a lot of trash in mumbai and india (more slums) but there are also really rich areas which are sometimes even better. Also he has a Merc, driver (cheap as shit) nice apartment (full AC) and lives a nice fancy lifestyle there I mean bankers earn 10X then the average starting salary for most industries. (unless you are a really good actor or something).

    I still feel like starting in NYC is better because of the network, but in the long run I think I would want to go to L.A., mumbai, SF. Honestly though I could change my mind next week lol and Technoviking thats good rent! Congratz

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • HFFBALLfan123's picture

    Chicago is by far the best bang for your buck...

  • In reply to NYCbandar
    captainradio's picture

    NYCbandar:

    3. MAKE FRIENDS WITH NON BANKERS.

    This x1000. Also make friends with a couple of hipsters, as annoying as they may seem, they always know how to have fun on a budget.

  • In reply to sdumb
    Kanon's picture

    sdumb:
    I saw some guy smoke crack on the 6 train last night (while it was moving). This was in midtown too. My biggest complaint about NYC (right now) is the lack of A/C, or any kind of temperature control, in the subway stations, especially Grand Central.

    Seriously? wtf?

    I've seen some people tripping in the street, but have never seen anyone openly do drugs when I lived there. I feel like I missed out on some crazy moments.

    I think the worst I've seen was a guy urinating inside a phone booth. And the usual "possessed by religion" folks in subways.

  • In reply to Ambition
    Kanon's picture

    Ambition:
    like i said i would love HK but I can speak any of the native languages there

    You can live in HK just fine w/o cantonese/mandarin, but specifically for finance/consulting type roles, language has become a huge barrier (particularly at junior levels), sadly...

    Unless of course you're in your mid 30s-40s, already established connections and experience in banking/PE/etc. and your exp/network is worth more than language. Even then I still see these high-level non-Asians having 'mandarin' skills - puts me to shame.

  • In reply to Kanon
    UFOinsider's picture

    Kanon:
    And the usual "possessed by religion" folks in subways.

    ^ passed one of those on the way to work this morning. It takes every once of willpower not to fuck with them. There's one dude on the PATH every fucking Friday who recites bible passages LOUDLY the entire ride, and there's another one in front of the NYSE but he's well dressed.

    Get busy living

  • shark445's picture

    Wow, I didn't realize NYC was THAT bad. You should start applying for jobs in San Francisco. I just moved here from San Diego, and it's unbelievable. Solid financial district, amazing nightlife, and it's relatively clean for such a big city.

    The girls are really hot here too. I live in the Marina District where everyone is in there 20's, so it's been a nice transition out of college.

  • In reply to UFOinsider
    Kanon's picture

    UFOinsider:
    Kanon:
    And the usual "possessed by religion" folks in subways.

    ^ passed one of those on the way to work this morning. It takes every once of willpower not to fuck with them. There's one dude on the PATH every fucking Friday who recites bible passages LOUDLY the entire ride, and there's another one in front of the NYSE but he's well dressed.

    I guess I never became one of those hard-edged New Yorkers while I was there... the kind that take the seat next to these crazies w/o hesitation,and don't bat an eye or squirm away.

    As fun as it could potentially be, I totally would NOT mess around with these folks. No idea what they're capable of... or what their spirits are gonna compel them to do...

  • In reply to Kanon
    UFOinsider's picture

    Kanon:
    UFOinsider:
    Kanon:
    And the usual "possessed by religion" folks in subways.

    ^ passed one of those on the way to work this morning. It takes every once of willpower not to fuck with them. There's one dude on the PATH every fucking Friday who recites bible passages LOUDLY the entire ride, and there's another one in front of the NYSE but he's well dressed.

    I guess I never became one of those hard-edged New Yorkers while I was there... the kind that take the seat next to these crazies w/o hesitation,and don't bat an eye or squirm away.

    As fun as it could potentially be, I totally would NOT mess around with these folks. No idea what they're capable of... or what their spirits are gonna compel them to do...


    I take the next train or get on another car....he scares the shit out of me more than any gangster. There's no telling WHAT that type will do. He gets on the train and I'm like "hell no, I'm outta here"

    Get busy living

  • guyfromct's picture

    NYC is a mixed bag, some will love it and some will hate it. For most it's just a stopping-off point for a few years. The best parts of the city are the food, the diversity, the fact that it doesn't close down early (DC Metro shuts down by midnight on weekdays and union stations shops and restaurants close by 9), the fact it is really safe, it is the finance capital of the world and it is like nowhere else on earth. The downsides are mainly the cost, the fact that it is tough to raise a family in Manhattan unless you are well into the 7 figure club, the noise (that's true in most cities though), the crowding and the lack of open space. There are nice places in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx (Riverdale) which are a bit more suburban/have lawns, but don't expect a 1/4 acre lot in NYC. Most of the criticisms are fairly generic and could apply anywhere. Here in Miami Beach we have homeless, a godawful mass transit system, traffic in South Beach is horrible, the tourists, but on the whole I love it and wouldn't give it up. Everywhere has its share of problems NYC is good, but not perfect.

  • In reply to awm55
    Bondarb's picture

    awm55:
    Bondarb:
    NYC is the only global city in America. Yes if you hang out with a bunch of bankers all day and go get drunk every night in crappy irish pubs in midtown then it will suck. Thats like saying you went to Tokyo and it sucks because they have a McDonalds which you hung out at the entire time. Not liking New York is a reflection of you, not the city. If you cant find a good time here then you are hopeless and you should leave...but please dont blame it on anybody but yourself.

    I really disagree, NYC does not provide an opportunity to live in the heart of the city in a neighborhood that provides a decent quality of life. I grew up outside NYC and now live in London, the best neighborhoods in London are in the heart of the city but also provide a great quality of life. Most of them are quiet, clean, and very close to loads of green spaces. The only decent neighborhoods that are close to a park are the UES and UWS, both of which are plagued by the stupid grid system making it such that you are no more than a 2 min walk from a major road.

    Downtown is a great place to go out, but its cramped and not close to any parks.

    I live in west village which I consider to to be the "heart of the city"...I am not quite sure what you mean by that phrase. I have an 8 minute subway or a 4 minute cab to and from work everyday. If you really need green spaces go to the park...but this is a city not a nature preserve.

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