B-School Q&A w/ Betsy Massar of Master Admissions

I'm Betsy Massar, founder of Master Admissions. I'm glad to be here on Wall Street Oasis back with kindred spirits. Right out of Harvard Business School I worked for Goldman Sachs and have spent most of my professional career in and around the financial industry. I worked on both the sell and buy sides (Barclays Global Investors, now BlackRock), and have worked on Wall Street, Asia, and San Francisco.

You might think I am partial to HBS, but I'm actually quite fond of Stanford Graduate School of Business, as a communications and resume coach and an editor of GSB professors' academic papers. I am also a writer for the Journal of PortfolioManagement. Back to MBA admissions, I'm a member of the Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants, the industry group, and a bit of an ethical watchdog on all things MBA admissions.

Lately I've been doing pro-bono work for the Forte Foundation, which has really amazing resources for women, and for a group called Service2School.org, which offers free application counseling to military vets.

And yes, that's me communing with a monkey in the pic.

For this Q&A thread, I'd like to focus on these two things:

  1. How you can improve your profile to get into one of the best business schools in the world
  2. How to talk about leadership in your application.

In both cases, the answers may surprise you.

I look forward to reading your questions and learning about you.
If you keep it to just a paragraph or two, it's easier for everyone to read and for me to include your question in my response. No worries about follow up questions, please ask!

I will do my best to check in often and respond promptly.

 

Dear Betsy,

      Thank you very much for taking the time to give out advice for free. I am sure myself and many other monkey on <abbr title="Wall Street Oasis">WSO</abbr> are appreciative and grateful. I am very young (23 years old), and I know that it's too early to be thinking about business school. However, I would like to have an idea of where it would be possible for me to end up for an <abbr title="Masters in Business Administration">MBA</abbr> program in the future. Also, I would appreciate any advice that you have on improving my profile or any suggestions on how to talk about leaderships experiences.

My stats are as follows: Asian American Male, 23 years old, U.S. Citizen gmat score: 730, 50/51 Quant and 40/51 Verbal Undergrad: Fordham University, Cumulative GPA: 3.95/4:00, Major in Finance and Minor in Business Economics Class rank: top 2%, Highest GPA in the undergrad finance major Grad School: London Business School Masters in Management (2012-2013, haven't started yet) Extracurriculars: Involved in Asia Club, Finance Club, and did a volunteer internship with Asia Society After I start working full-time, I would definitely want to find time to work at an asian non-profit

Speak fluent English and Shanghai dialect, basic Mandarin, and basic Spanish Post-LBS, I am probably going to begin a career in investment banking in either London or Singapore

My post MBA goals are PE/VC, and my target schools are HBS/Wharton/LBS/Columbia (the traditional "finance" schools)

I don't think that I would be a good fit for the midwestern Chicago culture or the techy culture of Stanford. If you have additional insights into other programs that are good for PE/VC or any advice in general, I would love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks!

 
shanghaibanker123:
Dear Betsy,
      Thank you very much for taking the time to give out advice for free. I am sure myself and many other monkey on <abbr title="Wall Street Oasis">WSO</abbr> are appreciative and grateful. I am very young (23 years old), and I know that it's too early to be thinking about business school. However, I would like to have an idea of where it would be possible for me to end up for an <abbr title="Masters in Business Administration">MBA</abbr> program in the future. Also, I would appreciate any advice that you have on improving my profile or any suggestions on how to talk about leaderships experiences.

,,,,

Speak fluent English and Shanghai dialect, basic Mandarin, and basic Spanish Post-LBS, I am probably going to begin a career in investment banking in either London or Singapore

My post MBA goals are PE/VC, and my target schools are HBS/Wharton/LBS/Columbia (the traditional "finance" schools)

I don't think that I would be a good fit for the midwestern Chicago culture or the techy culture of Stanford. If you have additional insights into other programs that are good for PE/VC or any advice in general, I would love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks!

Hi Shanghai Banker, Thanks for being the first to weigh in. I want to say that it's a real honor to be on this forum, and I certainly hope I can add some insight into the whole process. i look forward to getting to know some of you online and maybe even in person.

In your case, you already have the next year planned out for you by going to the LBS Masters in Management Programme, which is one of the premier post-undergraduate programs of its kind. Some might say that it's enough to get your MiM, and not even to bother with an MBA, but they are not mutually exclusive.

It's going to be a fantastic, eye-opening, learning experience, surrounding you with an international cohort of top students. You will learn from them about their own experiences and backgrounds -- and that's more than half of the benefit of being at LBS.

I know you are trying to plan things way out, but since my focus on this thread is really about what you can do right now, my suggestion is to relax and enjoy your position. I don't want to give you suggestions on which schools, because I think that will narrow, rather than expand your choices.

Think strategically: If you really want to go into PE or VC (bearing in mind that these industries may look very different after your receive your MBA), then spend time meeting people in both those industries. You can

Find out : --What they like about their jobs --What they wish they knew --What kind of international experience should you aim for now --What they do for fun

And whatever else you want to ask.

I also am glad to see that you want to work at an Asian non-profit. That would be amazing. Do it! And tell us all about what you learned. I lived in Asia for 10 years (Taiwan, Singapore, HK, and even a bit in Vietnam) -- and boy do I miss it. Especially the food!

Let us know how it goes, Best regards, Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 
Betsy Massar:
shanghaibanker123:
Dear Betsy,
      Thank you very much for taking the time to give out advice for free. I am sure myself and many other monkey on <abbr title="Wall Street Oasis">WSO</abbr> are appreciative and grateful. I am very young (23 years old), and I know that it's too early to be thinking about business school. However, I would like to have an idea of where it would be possible for me to end up for an <abbr title="Masters in Business Administration">MBA</abbr> program in the future. Also, I would appreciate any advice that you have on improving my profile or any suggestions on how to talk about leaderships experiences.

,,,,

Speak fluent English and Shanghai dialect, basic Mandarin, and basic Spanish Post-LBS, I am probably going to begin a career in investment banking in either London or Singapore

My post MBA goals are PE/VC, and my target schools are HBS/Wharton/LBS/Columbia (the traditional "finance" schools)

I don't think that I would be a good fit for the midwestern Chicago culture or the techy culture of Stanford. If you have additional insights into other programs that are good for PE/VC or any advice in general, I would love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks!

Hi Shanghai Banker, Thanks for being the first to weigh in. I want to say that it's a real honor to be on this forum, and I certainly hope I can add some insight into the whole process. i look forward to getting to know some of you online and maybe even in person.

In your case, you already have the next year planned out for you by going to the LBS Masters in Management Programme, which is one of the premier post-undergraduate programs of its kind. Some might say that it's enough to get your MiM, and not even to bother with an MBA, but they are not mutually exclusive.

It's going to be a fantastic, eye-opening, learning experience, surrounding you with an international cohort of top students. You will learn from them about their own experiences and backgrounds -- and that's more than half of the benefit of being at LBS.

I know you are trying to plan things way out, but since my focus on this thread is really about what you can do right now, my suggestion is to relax and enjoy your position. I don't want to give you suggestions on which schools, because I think that will narrow, rather than expand your choices.

Think strategically: If you really want to go into PE or VC (bearing in mind that these industries may look very different after your receive your MBA), then spend time meeting people in both those industries. You can

Find out : --What they like about their jobs --What they wish they knew --What kind of international experience should you aim for now --What they do for fun

And whatever else you want to ask.

I also am glad to see that you want to work at an Asian non-profit. That would be amazing. Do it! And tell us all about what you learned. I lived in Asia for 10 years (Taiwan, Singapore, HK, and even a bit in Vietnam) -- and boy do I miss it. Especially the food!

Let us know how it goes, Best regards, Betsy

Hi Betsy,

Thank you for the excellent advice! Your experience in Asia sounds amazing, and I definitely want to spend some time in either/both HK sometime in the future. The diversity of the student body and the world-class curriculum were what attracted me to LBS, and I am definitely extremely excited to meet my new classmates as well as live in London. Your list of questions is very helpful and I will definitely keep them in mind as I go through the grad program and my first job. Once I get involved with an asian non-profit, I will definitely come back to post about my experience here. Asian food is the best, and every time I go to Shanghai, I seem to come back a few pounds heavier. I definitely hope to stay in touch and hear more about your experiences in Asia.

Cheers, Shanghaibanker

 

Yep, I grew up in the States. The thing is I pushed all of my GMAT studying into 2 weeks to meet LBS deadlines. Did very minimal studying, which I know is really bad. Math was always the stronger section, and verbal was always weaker. Embarassing story, but I drank too many energy drinks before the exam and really had to use the bathroom during the verbal section with my current score as a result lol. If I have to re-take for a 20-30 point boost, I would definitely be open to it as well.

 
shanghaibanker123:
Yep, I grew up in the States. The thing is I pushed all of my GMAT studying into 2 weeks to meet LBS deadlines. Did very minimal studying, which I know is really bad. Math was always the stronger section, and verbal was always weaker. Embarassing story, but I drank too many energy drinks before the exam and really had to use the bathroom during the verbal section with my current score as a result lol. If I have to re-take for a 20-30 point boost, I would definitely be open to it as well.

You're already looking far better than most applicants, I just thought your split was unusual. On the bright side, there's no need to worry about it at all for a while.

 

Hi Betsy,

I'm graduating from undergrad this week and was wondering, based on my stats, what I could do to improve my chances over the next few years. I don't want my life to revolve around going to b-school, but I would like to know if you have any tips for things I should look into on the side. I would like to stay in Finance (dream is to work as an Analyst for a hedge fund) preferably on the West coast.

My question: Which schools will I be competitive for in 4 years and what could I do on the side to improve my odds at Stanford/Harvard?

My stats: - Starting in Equity Research with an elite buyside firm (~$100 bil. AUM), would like to matriculate in 4 years - 730 GMAT (48 Q, 42 V), just took it - 3.65 GPA in Finance from state school (Magna Cum Laude and Beta Gamma Sigma) - President of undergrad Finance club, Treasurer of Fraternity, several awards for leadership - 5 undergrad internships - 1 in IB M&A, 1 in IB public finance - Private Pilot (looking to start training aerobatics) - Starting professional prep./leadership development non-profit for highschool students

I know it's a little early to be thinking about this, but I'd love to hear your opinion on what I could do to improve my application. Thanks in advance for your help!

 
eriginal:
Hi Betsy,

I'm graduating from undergrad this week and was wondering, based on my stats, what I could do to improve my chances over the next few years. I don't want my life to revolve around going to b-school, but I would like to know if you have any tips for things I should look into on the side. I would like to stay in Finance (dream is to work as an Analyst for a hedge fund) preferably on the West coast.

My question: Which schools will I be competitive for in 4 years and what could I do on the side to improve my odds at Stanford/Harvard?

My stats: - Starting in Equity Research with an elite buyside firm (~$100 bil. AUM), would like to matriculate in 4 years - 730 GMAT (48 Q, 42 V), just took it - 3.65 GPA in Finance from state school (Magna Cum Laude and Beta Gamma Sigma) - President of undergrad Finance club, Treasurer of Fraternity, several awards for leadership - 5 undergrad internships - 1 in IB M&A, 1 in IB public finance - Private Pilot (looking to start training aerobatics) - Starting professional prep./leadership development non-profit for highschool students

I know it's a little early to be thinking about this, but I'd love to hear your opinion on what I could do to improve my application. Thanks in advance for your help!

Hi Eriginal, Andy is right, that's one awesome hobby! Also, congratulations on graduating this week. It looks like you've done quite a bit in your 4 years. And also congratulations for having taken the GMAT. I'd like to evangelize your strategy -- taking the GMAT and getting it out of the way so you can concentrate on the rest, that is your life!

As I read through your email, it looks to me like you want to work for Pimco or a division of Blackrock, right? If so, I actually wonder if you are already on your way there by having landed such a great post-undergraduate job.
In reality, the best thing you can do now is to concentrate on performing well at that job. Admissions officers care about career progression, but it's too early for me to advise you on what you can do because you haven't even started.

So I would have to say, keep doing what you are doing, and if you want to start studying for your CFA, that can't hurt either.

Having said that, since this is my first day, I am going to spell out a bit of what I've been thinking about lately, especially as I have been working with some undergraduate groups lately. Here's the deal -- the top business schools are looking for 3 things 1. Intellectual ability 2. Career progression 3. Global awareness

In your case, you have pretty much proven you have the smarts and are on your way to career progression. You also seem like in interesting person who has made the most of his time on this earth so far. My bet is that you will do the same for the next few years.

As you look forward, see if you can incorporate an international angle into your career and your life. Tomorrow's leaders will be global leaders. The top schools are 33% or more filled with international students. You cannot even qualify for a school like INSEAD unless you are bilingual.

Even if you've never had the chance to live or work abroad, I guarantee you will be working on a cross-cultural project within the next 5 years. If you can bring some experience with and sensitivity to other cultures, you will add more to your future class and work teams.

I wrote a blog post on the three things admissions officers are looking for : here.

Good luckl

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

hi,

Canadian, quant at a hedge fund (1b aum) in NYC for 2 years. Computer science, 3.4 in the US 760 gmat, 50math/42

which school should i focus? which schools are a long shot?

Thanks

 
lil_barac:
hi,

Canadian, quant at a hedge fund (1b aum) in NYC for 2 years. Computer science, 3.4 in the US 760 gmat, 50math/42

which school should i focus? which schools are a long shot?

Thanks

Hi Lil Barac

I have to be honest. You should focus on the schools which interest you the most. Business school admissions and the business schools themselves are holistic. That is, they look for the right fit for the right person. It's really your job to do your research to figure out what schools appeal. The schools spend a lot of time and money on marketing and outreach. Take advantage.

The numbers themselves are merely goalposts. If your stats are within the standard deviation of what the school publishes on its class profile page, then perhaps you are in the running. from what I can tell, your numbers look fine. But I cannot tell you any more than that.

Admissions are much more art than science. If you have good numbers, then you have passed one hurdle. And . But when considering the top 15 schools that show up regularly in the top 10, that's only a small piece of it. The rest is all about your leadership: character, goals, teamwork, and vision.

I suggest you attend a few outreach sessions that all the business schools put on in New York and talk to current students and recent grads. That will be some of the best use of your time over the next few years as you embark on the application process. It's worth it.

Best to you, Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 
Betsy Massar:

Hi Lil Barac

I have to be honest. You should focus on the schools which interest you the most. Business school admissions and the business schools themselves are holistic. That is, they look for the right fit for the right person. It's really your job to do your research to figure out what schools appeal. The schools spend a lot of time and money on marketing and outreach. Take advantage.

The numbers themselves are merely goalposts. If your stats are within the standard deviation of what the school publishes on its class profile page, then perhaps you are in the running. from what I can tell, your numbers look fine. But I cannot tell you any more than that.

Admissions are much more art than science. If you have good numbers, then you have passed one hurdle. And . But when considering the top 15 schools that show up regularly in the top 10, that's only a small piece of it. The rest is all about your leadership: character, goals, teamwork, and vision.

I suggest you attend a few outreach sessions that all the business schools put on in New York and talk to current students and recent grads. That will be some of the best use of your time over the next few years as you embark on the application process. It's worth it.

Best to you, Betsy

Thanks Betsy.

To be more precise, my weaknesses are my low gpa, only 2 years of work experience (by the time i start business school). What do you think is the best buy to address those areas?

Thanks

 

Hello Betsy:

I think I have a competitive profile for the top schools but things didn't go well when I applied last time. I need to know how to improve my application (through messaging, as realistically, there isn't a ton I can do between now and the fall)

My stats: Currently ~2 years at top consulting firm, top of class and will be promoted this summer (will have ~3 years at matriculation) 3.8 in Econ from a top LAC (think Vassar/Wesleyan/Middlebury); the only person to make the jump from my school directly to my company 750+ GMAT, but buoyed by a very strong verbal score (thanks, liberal arts college!) Varsity captain and President of student business club in college, but weak organized extracurriculars after college

Long term, I want to move up the ranks at a sports-focused consumer or retail firm, and eventually become COO. Short term, I'll stay in consulting (I'm sponsored).

I probably didn't do a great job of stating my long-term goals last time (knew I wanted something sports-related and retail-related), I'm on the younger side, and a white male consultant, and I don't have "save the world" type goals or experience.

I do have strong experience from a premier firm, strong stats, interesting casework (a mix of blue-chips, quirky industries and highly public projects), realistic goals (consumer/retail/sports are my current focus at work/personally), and should have international experience by the time I apply (would have gone before, but got offered projects that were too cool domestically to turn down).

I couldn't get any interest from HBS or Stanford before, and I wonder whether that's even the right place to look. Everyone I work with jush pushes their alma mater as the best place to go, but I can't find too many objective parties who understand me, my goals, and business schools...

Thanks, petergibbons

Life, liberty and the pursuit of Starwood Points
 
petergibbons:
Hello Betsy:

I think I have a competitive profile for the top schools but things didn't go well when I applied last time. I need to know how to improve my application (through messaging, as realistically, there isn't a ton I can do between now and the fall)

My stats: Currently ~2 years at top consulting firm, top of class and will be promoted this summer (will have ~3 years at matriculation) 3.8 in Econ from a top LAC (think Vassar/Wesleyan/Middlebury); the only person to make the jump from my school directly to my company 750+ GMAT, but buoyed by a very strong verbal score (thanks, liberal arts college!) Varsity captain and President of student business club in college, but weak organized extracurriculars after college

Long term, I want to move up the ranks at a sports-focused consumer or retail firm, and eventually become COO. Short term, I'll stay in consulting (I'm sponsored).

I probably didn't do a great job of stating my long-term goals last time (knew I wanted something sports-related and retail-related), I'm on the younger side, and a white male consultant, and I don't have "save the world" type goals or experience.

I do have strong experience from a premier firm, strong stats, interesting casework (a mix of blue-chips, quirky industries and highly public projects), realistic goals (consumer/retail/sports are my current focus at work/personally), and should have international experience by the time I apply (would have gone before, but got offered projects that were too cool domestically to turn down).

I couldn't get any interest from HBS or Stanford before, and I wonder whether that's even the right place to look. Everyone I work with jush pushes their alma mater as the best place to go, but I can't find too many objective parties who understand me, my goals, and business schools...

Thanks, petergibbons

First, I have to say I love your tagline! Starwood points is hilarious. I hope you show that kind of spontaneity in your new applications. Second, I have to admit I am a sucker for liberal arts college types, as I did go to Vassar. I actually think the liberal arts combo with a quantitative job shows a tendency toward well-roundedness. So that's a big positive.

My guess, and this is a guess, is that you didn't have enough career progression, and here's what you can do now: keep working and try to get as much international exposure as you can. Global awareness is huge at business schools, and even if you cannot work abroad between now and then, see if you can jump on a cross-cultural team.

I actually think you have all sorts of potential, and a reapplication based more diverse and responsible work experience is actually the easiest argument you can make for yourself.

There's also a possibility that you had boring essays and non-differentiating recommendations, or just didn't show enough self-awareness. I personally don't think the white male from a premier consulting firm is insurmountable. It's just a matter of showing more of who you really are and -- I hate to say this here on a website full of Wall Streeters, -- you need to show some vulnerability.

Having said all that, if you just applied to Harvard and Stanford, the probabilities are just plain too low. It isn't clear if that's what you did, so forgive me if I am making assumptions. You want to be a good risk manager next time and apply to about five or six schools. I personally believe there are 15 schools in the top 10 (just compare the rankings of US News and BusinessWeek, not to mention the weird Economist and FT rankings) so you have actually plenty of choices.

Please feel free to PM me if you want to have a longer conversation about your own situation, I'd be delighted to hear more about you and your sporty goals.

Go to sleep now, Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

Hi Betsy,

Many thanks for your attention and time spent on this forum,helping us.

Currently I am enrolled masters student in George Washington University Business School(Information Systems Technologies) and in about 2-3 years I really want to successfully apply to HSW MBA.

My current stats are:

28 years old ( will be 31-32 during application to MBA) Azerbaijan(exUSSR) citizenship BSc in European Studies (4.4/5) MSc in GWU (will push it to 3.7+ GPA) Pretty sure that I will hit 710-720 GMAT Work exp: 15 years (from the age of 10) of professional chess career,4 times national champion etc,international master 1 year in United Nations AIDS organization in Russia as an IT Consultant 2 years in BP as Organizational Capability Specialist (technical development,deployment,recruiting) my post masters and pre-mba employment is a mystery for now,but I plan to join either a management/strategy consulting (in best case) or IT consulting company (Big4,Accenture etc) for about 2-3 years. I speak fluent English,native Russian,Azeri,basic Turkish and Swedish. Fulbright scholar/fellow. A lot of extrac. and nonprofit activities.

Could you advise will I have any chances at 32 applying to H/S/W ? Or I better look for a less selective schools? I read a lot that nowdays 30+ is kind of out of the range especially in top programs.

Thanks for your help, Elmir

 

Hi Elmir, In answer to your specific question, can I advise on your chances, all I can say is that you have to look at the histogram on Harvard's age bracket and figure the numbers out . I took this from Dee Leopold''s blog post of June 21, 2011,

http://www.hbs.edu/mba/images/site/class13graph.png

15 years of work experience is literally, off the chart.

So I'm not sure there's much I can advise you at this stage, and I'm not even sure that an MBA makes sense for you. Why would you want to take two more years off after you graduate from the GW program?
I'm not quite sure of your real focus, and you are making a lot of assumptions about your future career. I would suggest you focus on getting the best possible job you can that corresponds with your goals. Figure out your "mystery" and align it with a vision first. Otherwise, It looks a lot like check the box.

Wish I could answer yes, go for it! But even with your excellent language and international experience, I'm not convinced why you are on the pre-MBA path. If anyone else on this forum can weigh in, please do, as may be missing something.

Best regards, Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 
TW Pepper:
lol she didnt even read what you said man

TW Pepper, what do you mean? What question didn't I answer? Happy to try again.

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

He said 15 years chess experience not 15 years work experience, and hes not going to take 2 years off after mfin hes going to work for 2 years(his plan is mfin then job then mba after getting experience)

 

Oh my, thank you for pointing that out! I stand totally corrected about the chess experience. I truly apologize. My bad.

And yet... by the time Elmir finishes his degree -- not an M.Fin, but a MS in IT, (right?) he will be at the tail end of the histogram -- at least for HBS.

But, I still think that there's a lot of "maybes" in his career -- he's gone from international development to IT, and is now talking about getting a job in a top-tier consulting firm pre-MBA. But he himself said he's still not sure: (my post masters and pre-mba employment is a mystery for now,but I plan to join either a management/strategy consulting (in best case) or IT consulting company (Big4,Accenture etc) for about 2-3 years.)

and because of that, I find it hard to advise, since it isn't clear whether he really needs or wants an MBA.

Elmir has pretty exciting credentials and an interesting, international outlook. But it's impossible to give credible advice about getting into an MBA program without knowing where he is going to be in about 3-4 years. And even then, why does he need such a program? His is a case where it just isn't clear that the financial and time investment might not advance him any further than he can get already, especially if he lands one of those prestige consulting jobs.

@Marcus2012 (Elmir) sorry if your ears are burning as refer to your post. Please clarify any misconceptions -- like TW Pepper did -- he's doing a good job keeping me honest.

Many thanks and have a good weekend Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

Yes,now everything is the way as it is ,yet I think that I will still need an MBA at the age of 32-33 by various reasons,probably some top 1-year program not from HSW... In any case - thanks for your time and advice!I really appreciate.

 
marcus2012:
Yes,now everything is the way as it is ,yet I think that I will still need an MBA at the age of 32-33 by various reasons,probably some top 1-year program not from HSW... In any case - thanks for your time and advice!I really appreciate.

Let us know how you get on as things progress!

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

@Phantombanker wrote a very insightful article about the new HBS format, and I am commenting on it here because he's looking only for potential applicants to comment on his thread.

So I thought I would post a few immediate thoughts about the change, bearing in mind that this announcement represents, as Dee says, "the product of an admissions team that is always in design/development mode."

It's true, there are fewer words, but if you've ever tried your hand at writing a sonnet as opposed to a blog post, you will notice that the number of words is not correlated with the effort.

To me, it looks like they are setting the bar higher for people who don't have the numbers. I do know that some people say that the "feeder schools" and careers are also equally important, but they do take second place. I think admissions officers are tired of someone getting a 3.0 GPA from even a very tough school and trying to make the case that they had extenuating leadership experiences.

Dee has always said out loud, "hello, we're a school," and I would have to say that the new format does put more emphasis on the academic entry point.

As for the wording of the questions, to me it seems like it is still a story about an accomplishment and a story about a setback. I think the wording of the accomplishment essay was dated; as far as I know that question has been around since the Dark Ages, at least, I had to answer it, and I was in Jamie Dimon's class (and Immelt's, & Klarman's & Conard's, & Zoe Cruz's).

The interview is, and has always been a huge deal at Harvard. I don't see any change there. But the redress, that's cool. I think it does give the student the chance to round out the picture. I'm a bit puzzled why they came up with this new technique; it's not like it mirrors anything in business that I can recall -- but I may have to do more research.

Anyway, the floor is open -- and happy to answer questions.

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

I'm wondering if you think I have a shot at somewhere good (T10 ideally--I want to do asset management or strategy consulting) with two years of experience or if I should try to find a more directly business-related job and wait another two years.

My profile: - Paralegal at a white-shoe law firm, doing business development and marketing as well as legal support for cases involving hedge funds/private equity firms/Fortune 500 companies - 3.8 at a T10 liberal arts college, B.A. in History with High Honors - Editor-in-chief of a journal - GMAT score pending but likely high--SAT score was above 1500 - interned at a private equity firm and a hedge fund, with a strong rec from a partner at the hedge fund. Also interned at a top business school in France as an English teacher.

 
nerdspeak:
I'm wondering if you think I have a shot at somewhere good (T10 ideally--I want to do asset management or strategy consulting) with two years of experience or if I should try to find a more directly business-related job and wait another two years.

My profile: - Paralegal at a white-shoe law firm, doing business development and marketing as well as legal support for cases involving hedge funds/private equity firms/Fortune 500 companies - 3.8 at a T10 liberal arts college, B.A. in History with High Honors - Editor-in-chief of a journal - GMAT score pending but likely high--SAT score was above 1500 - interned at a private equity firm and a hedge fund, with a strong rec from a partner at the hedge fund. Also interned at a top business school in France as an English teacher.

Hi nerdspeak, I've got a couple of ideas, some of which may go against the grain -- just to shake things up. If you get over 80% on your quant score, and feel grounded around your "why now" answer, then I think you might want to try applying now. Why? if you get in, great, if not, you can go ahead with your plans to get more work experience in your chosen field, and come back a year or two later with new & improved experience.

Here are some other thoughts-- I know it's a forum, so hard to get into public details, but you will need to explain why you are at a law firm if you already have HF and PE experience. No one will fault you for that if you are comfortable with your own answer (PS, this is true for almost any choices anyone makes as they apply to business school). I also suggest you get a fix on why asset management OR strategy consulting -- as they are very different in practice. Otherwise you look a bit too opportunistic, again, in itself, not a bad thing in the investing world, but business schools are looking for more authenticity.

Another thing people overlook is the quality of the transcript. By that I mean, not just that you got a 3.8 (congrats!) but if you showed a pattern of intellectual curiosity and challenge. I worked with a student, now going to HBS, who had a super GPA from a top liberal arts college, but the thing that made her stand head and shoulders above the others was her ability to get A's in organic chemistry, "topics in single variable calculus," as well as "Reading Homer and Virgil"

It sounds like you probably took some great courses, but they will look for your hard-core analytic ability, and AP courses don't count. If you don't have them yet, take an online calculus course from an accredited school and get an A. (will I get silver bananas if I mention the WSO courses too?)

And how is your career progression? A strong work-in-process, with tangible, measurable results? Doesn't matter where you work, HF or the Metropolitan Opera, you have to be able to show that element as well. Do you feel you can apply with what you've got so far?

Anxious to hear the rest, Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 
Betsy Massar:
nerdspeak:
I'm wondering if you think I have a shot at somewhere good (T10 ideally--I want to do asset management or strategy consulting) with two years of experience or if I should try to find a more directly business-related job and wait another two years.

My profile: - Paralegal at a white-shoe law firm, doing business development and marketing as well as legal support for cases involving hedge funds/private equity firms/Fortune 500 companies - 3.8 at a T10 liberal arts college, B.A. in History with High Honors - Editor-in-chief of a journal - GMAT score pending but likely high--SAT score was above 1500 - interned at a private equity firm and a hedge fund, with a strong rec from a partner at the hedge fund. Also interned at a top business school in France as an English teacher.

Hi nerdspeak, I've got a couple of ideas, some of which may go against the grain -- just to shake things up. If you get over 80% on your quant score, and feel grounded around your "why now" answer, then I think you might want to try applying now. Why? if you get in, great, if not, you can go ahead with your plans to get more work experience in your chosen field, and come back a year or two later with new & improved experience.

Here are some other thoughts-- I know it's a forum, so hard to get into public details, but you will need to explain why you are at a law firm if you already have HF and PE experience. No one will fault you for that if you are comfortable with your own answer (PS, this is true for almost any choices anyone makes as they apply to business school). I also suggest you get a fix on why asset management OR strategy consulting -- as they are very different in practice. Otherwise you look a bit too opportunistic, again, in itself, not a bad thing in the investing world, but business schools are looking for more authenticity.

Another thing people overlook is the quality of the transcript. By that I mean, not just that you got a 3.8 (congrats!) but if you showed a pattern of intellectual curiosity and challenge. I worked with a student, now going to HBS, who had a super GPA from a top liberal arts college, but the thing that made her stand head and shoulders above the others was her ability to get A's in organic chemistry, "topics in single variable calculus," as well as "Reading Homer and Virgil"

It sounds like you probably took some great courses, but they will look for your hard-core analytic ability, and AP courses don't count. If you don't have them yet, take an online calculus course from an accredited school and get an A. (will I get silver bananas if I mention the WSO courses too?)

And how is your career progression? A strong work-in-process, with tangible, measurable results? Doesn't matter where you work, HF or the Metropolitan Opera, you have to be able to show that element as well. Do you feel you can apply with what you've got so far?

Anxious to hear the rest, Betsy

Betsy,

Thanks for the feedback!

I’m at the law firm because the hedge fund I worked for rescinded my offer a month before graduation and I needed a job—at that point it was too late to do recruiting at banks or consulting firms (my parents don’t live in a financial center so I couldn’t move home and wait for something perfect). I chose this paralegal position in particular because there’s a marketing/business development component and the cases mostly involve financial services. Obviously I’d spin this a bit differently in my essays and say I thought I wanted to do law or something.

I realize the consulting v. AM thing is a potential problem. I need to resolve it. That’s pretty much all I can say right now unfortunately. I like consulting because of the exposure to a variety of different problems and it’s what I’m trying to break into right now pre-MBA as it seems more open to liberal arts majors and less freaked out by the crisis, but asset management is my long-term goal. I’m most attracted to value investing rather than short-term options trading or something, so to my mind the two fields are related.

As far as “hard-core analytic ability,” I took courses in symbolic logic, but I haven’t taken calculus or statistics since high school…I drank the humanities kool-aid pretty hard. I’m sure I could do well in online courses in calculus or stat though.

I think my career progression has been good. Unfortunately cases take forever in commercial litigation, but I’ve conducted audits of discovery costs with legal consulting companies and managed several business development projects. I’ve also assisted with a big internal investigations at a F25 company.

Anyway, I think I’m going to take your advice and apply, although in my ideal world I would work in consulting for two years, then do an MBA and switch to asset management.

Thanks again!

 

Hi Betsy,

This is a great thread. For someone who was laid off for a fairly long period of time (roughly two years), what would be the best way to account for that lost time in an essay for business school? Or is this something that should be focused on in an essay?

Thank you!

 
TraderDaily:
Hi Betsy,

This is a great thread. For someone who was laid off for a fairly long period of time (roughly two years), what would be the best way to account for that lost time in an essay for business school? Or is this something that should be focused on in an essay?

Thank you!

Hi TraderDaily, thanks for asking. There's a couple of misperceptions about being laid off that I want to put to rest. First, it's no badge of shame. Almost everyone gets laid off, and after the mess that was the 2008-9 financial crisis, it wasn't easy to find a decent position. I've seen lots of successful candidates who were wandering around during that time when the finance-related professional positions contracted.

Like in any job interview, admissions reps will be asking themselves, "what did he do with that time?" If you were productive -- that is, using that time to educate yourself in some way (courses, licenses, training) , do some independent consulting, and/or volunteered to use up those non-office hours, then almost any admissions officer will get it. If you bounced back from a bad time, even better -- because everyone loves a turnaround story.

I've also seen successful candidates start their own businesses during fallow periods -- and ended up being challenged in some unexpected ways. That's also a plus.

Try not to look at it as "lost time," or that won't help you. Do look at it as a learning opportunity. And given that it was probably significant, it is definitely worth writing about. The application usually asks for you to account for anything over a 3-month gap, so you will have to own up to it anyway. Then it's your choice whether to discuss it in one of the regular essays or in the optional essay.

Believe me, I don't want to sound like Mary Sunshine on this --but being out of work for awhile, especially in a fluid economy, isn't the end of the world.

Hope that answers the question!

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

Hey Betsy. Great thread so far, thanks for all your insight. I'd like to ask about my chances. My stats are:

Big Ten school, 3.6 GPA Finance and Economics double major 730 GMAT (can't remember the split, although the quantitative was higher than the verbal) 2 years BB M&A experience, will have 2 more years PE or (hopefully) VC School Extracurriculars: Captain of club sport team, co-founded a microfinance club , Gluten-Free Club member, and the standard finance club stuff Outside School Extracurriculars: Between freshman and sophomore year I guided a 28 day canoe trip in Canadian wilderness for 7 boys after their sophomore year in high school. Also, after I graduated I taught kids computer classes (Word, PPT) for 3 weeks in an elementary school in an incredibly poor area in Nicaragua. In addition, and I don't know if this counts, I've traveled extensively through South America. O and one more thing, I'm Hispanic.

I'm looking mostly at top 5 ish schools, with Stanford being my absolute first choice because I'd like to be apart of a start up or be a more mainstream entrepreneur. What are your thoughts?

 
ElSmokeoMucho:
Hey Betsy. Great thread so far, thanks for all your insight. I'd like to ask about my chances. My stats are:

Big Ten school, 3.6 GPA Finance and Economics double major 730 GMAT (can't remember the split, although the quantitative was higher than the verbal) 2 years BB M&A experience, will have 2 more years PE or (hopefully) VC School Extracurriculars: Captain of club sport team, co-founded a microfinance club , Gluten-Free Club member, and the standard finance club stuff Outside School Extracurriculars: Between freshman and sophomore year I guided a 28 day canoe trip in Canadian wilderness for 7 boys after their sophomore year in high school. Also, after I graduated I taught kids computer classes (Word, PPT) for 3 weeks in an elementary school in an incredibly poor area in Nicaragua. In addition, and I don't know if this counts, I've traveled extensively through South America. O and one more thing, I'm Hispanic.

I'm looking mostly at top 5 ish schools, with Stanford being my absolute first choice because I'd like to be apart of a start up or be a more mainstream entrepreneur. What are your thoughts?

To be honest, I cannot think of anything you haven't done right. You obviously have the smarts, you are athletic, bi-cultural and bi-lingual (right?) and have been around the block a few times. I think you are doing well by taking advantage of the post-investment banking rush to get into PE or VC -- my one recommendation is to look for a great fit with your next employer. I have seen that people who are really well supported (not necessarily financially, but mentored) by their employers in that industry do really well as they apply to business school

I guess you know I've seen a lot of people come and go at the GSB -- I was a critical analytical thinking course coach and continue to consult to the career management center there on resumes and cover letters. It's a great place. Come visit, get to know some students, get fluent in GSB lingo. Having said all that, it's still a bit of a wild card, even if you have all the right stuff. They have such a touchy-feely (in a good way) definition of leadership that it's hard to predict who is going to win a spot in the class.

So you are smart to look at other schools -- however you define the top 5. Don't be a slave to parsing the rankings, and use this time to talk to people honestly about their experiences in school and as they look for jobs. Because of your Hispanic heritage, If you are interested in staying in finance, you may be able to benefit from the Toigo Foundation -- free money!

Let us know how you get on,

Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

Betsy,

One topic I've seen a lot of conflicting information about on these forums is b-school admission from the Big 4, especially from traditional accounting roles as opposed to advisory. I've seen some people claim anything up to Wharton is possible and others say that any top 20 school is a stretch, obviously considering other factors. I just completed undergrad so the b-school process is a few years down the road (if ever) for me, but here's what I've done so far and expect to do:

3.5 GPA from a mid-tier Big 10 school, upward trend from a 1.9 freshman year 760 GMAT, above 90th percentile on both sections Expecting significantly better GPA from a top MAcc program next year Plan to enter the B4 in tax Weak ECs. Did some tutoring in undergrad, not sure if the future holds any major developments here.

What would you consider a reasonable range of schools if I were to pursue an MBA? Do you think someone with this kind of background would be significantly limited in the career paths available after completing the degree? I'm not expecting to waltz into KKR coming from filling out 1120s all day, but I would at least like to know that there's a decent range of finance positions that I'm competitive for.

 
obscenity:
Betsy,

One topic I've seen a lot of conflicting information about on these forums is b-school admission from the Big 4, especially from traditional accounting roles as opposed to advisory. I've seen some people claim anything up to Wharton is possible and others say that any top 20 school is a stretch, obviously considering other factors. I just completed undergrad so the b-school process is a few years down the road (if ever) for me, but here's what I've done so far and expect to do:

3.5 GPA from a mid-tier Big 10 school, upward trend from a 1.9 freshman year 760 GMAT, above 90th percentile on both sections Expecting significantly better GPA from a top MAcc program next year Plan to enter the B4 in tax Weak ECs. Did some tutoring in undergrad, not sure if the future holds any major developments here.

What would you consider a reasonable range of schools if I were to pursue an MBA? Do you think someone with this kind of background would be significantly limited in the career paths available after completing the degree? I'm not expecting to waltz into KKR coming from filling out 1120s all day, but I would at least like to know that there's a decent range of finance positions that I'm competitive for.

Hi Obscenity, Hope you are already enjoying the weekend. Don't you just love summer?

I'm only going to opine quickly on your first paragraph because some of it is untrue. I personally know people who got into great schools from the accounting side. One guy who comes to mind (who went to a mid-ranked school in California for undergrad) is starting at Kellogg this autumn. Do a LinkedIn search and you will find there's plenty to go around. (I just did to prove it to myself; it's true)

To answer the range of schools, I think you should research all that appeal. Seriously -- why limit yourself? OK, a 1.9 freshman year GPA is pretty weak, but you pulled yourself up, and obviously got your act together. If you do well in tax and get a chance to work on actual transactions, lead teams, and have some fun, you'll be fine. I think for you you want to get out and do well on the job, over-deliver, and be the guy that everyone fights over to have on the team.

Question: Where are you at with the CPA? That won't hurt either, because it's a decent professional designation, and a tough exam to pass.

I don't think you would be limited -- but 4-5 years from now we honestly don't know what the world and the economy will look like. I cannot think of a reason why you would not have many finance, or managerial, choices open to you. And by the way, KKR is not the Holy Grail. If you start getting really narrowly focused (which it doesn't sound like you are), then you won't be able to stumble upon other rocket ships that are out there. (Thank you Sheryl Sandberg).

BTW, Nice work on getting over 90% on both sections on the GMAT. That's unusual. In a good way. You must have read a lot of books in college. Any recommendations for us?

Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

Hi all, I truly apologize if this is spam, but I am moderating a pretty cool MBA panel on June 12 at the Harvard Club in San Francisco. We've got senior adcom -- not just alums or random people -- from HBS, Stanford GSB, Wharton, Haas, Tuck & Columbia. It's a pretty small venue for this kind of thing, and admissions people actually beg to join this event because there are so many good people in the audience. So if you can either check out your competition, or schmooze up some adcom before they get exhausted from reading applications.
Here's the link for registration: http://www.harvardclubsf.org/article.html?aid=436 And you do not have to be a member of the Harvard Club to attend -- all are welcome.

Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 
Betsy Massar:
Hi all, I truly apologize if this is spam, but I am moderating a pretty cool MBA panel on June 12 at the Harvard Club in San Francisco. We've got senior adcom -- not just alums or random people -- from HBS, Stanford GSB, Wharton, Haas, Tuck & Columbia. It's a pretty small venue for this kind of thing, and admissions people actually beg to join this event because there are so many good people in the audience. So you can either check out your competition, or schmooze up some adcom before they get exhausted from reading applications.
Here's the link for registration: http://www.harvardclubsf.org/article.html?aid=436 And you do not have to be a member of the Harvard Club to attend -- all are welcome.

Betsy

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

I just wanted to inquire about your post about getting into a top B-School such as Harvard, Stanford, etc. You said that it was very important for students to take classes in "hard science" classes. However, I am currently a Economics/Middle Eastern Studies double major at NYU. I'm a sophomore (junior this fall) interning in Equity Research and I could see myself in ER my entire life. I have absolutely no interest in STEM classes, yet I feel that Middle Eastern studies/ economics offers the best quantitative and qualitative approach. My (dream) plan is to work 2 years in NYC and then 2 years in the ME, yet, I am worried because you said HBS and other top business schools look for students who take hard science classes, which I have no interest taking.

My dream is to get into HBS/Columbia or an MBA business schools ">M7 school, but will I get dinged as a MEIS/Econ major? I have a 3.9 GPA which I'm going to try and keep up, but your advice would be so meaningful to me. Thank you.

 

Hi AQM, Thanks for the question. I do think that calculus is a requirement -- funny enough, even if you waived in on AP calculus for your requirement, taking more math and getting a decent grade is actually more helpful than having been so smart as to have passed it in high school. So if there's a "topics in applied math" or something like that, it's a good one, because it shows a)desire to challenge yourself and go out of your comfort zone and b)an ability to understand the logic of arguments. Derrick Bolton (head of Stanford GSB admissions) has gone on record as to saying that logic is an important skill for students to have grounding in before going to business school. This can be seen in the logic component of the first-year required course called Critical Analytical Thinking. (I was a coach to first-year students on that course, and there's a whole section on inductive and deductive reasoning)

Computer science courses could be challenging -- this is a personal thing, but I'd rather see more on decision science or game theory, because I think it's really relevant to markets analysis. But that's just me.

As for your Middle Eastern studies, that's helpful because it is relevant to the world, and shows an interest in globalness. If you have a second language and work experience overseas, especially in a developing country, that's even better. I hate to be check-the-box about the int'l element of an application, but it's really a very big component of the MBA experience. With the top schools about 1/3 international, you need to bring that element to the party so that you too can participate in the conversation.

You definitely won't get dinged as econ major at all. That's good. I just think to get you over the top academically, STEM courses are helpful. Also -- other students who have gone through b-school can chime in, your ability to write well and be persuasive in your communications skills are also a big deal. And that's where some of the liberal arts courses help. I know, it sounds like I am asking a lot of you, but you are asking a lot of yourself by wanting to go to a top school, and you are in the ball park.

Now go and enjoy the rest of the weekend!

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 

Question : What is maximum age to get in HBS.

3 year plan : Getmyself in good BB in PE or MA position, so after 3 year Can HBS can be an good option Age : 28 My resume : GMAT :750 Current : President of organization responsible for charity for cancer. Raising money every summer

CGGVeritas Public Company; 5001-10,000 employees; Oil & Energy industry February 2012 – Present (5 months) Calgary, Canada Area

Junior Geophysicist Divestco Inc. Public Company; 201-500 employees; DVT; Oil & Energy industry July 2011 – February 2012 (8 months) Calgary, Canada Area

Research Assistant CREWES, University of Calgary September 2008 – July 2011 (2 years 11 months) Calgary

Junior Research Fellow Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay Educational Institution; 10,001+ employees; Higher Education industry August 2007 – September 2008 (1 year 2 months) Mumbai Area, India Identification of Gas Hydrates presence using Seismic data Seismic Processing and Interpretation for Gas Hydrate identification. Developed Algorithm based on Artificial Neural Network for prediction of Seismic attributes like Faults. Model. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Filled Gas Hydrate Deposits Geoscientist http://www.rmsi.com/anr/applications/oil.asp Privately Held; 1001-5000 employees; Information Technology and Services industry January 2007 – June 2007 (6 months) Noida Area, India

Seismic interpretation and integration of multidata sets to identify lead/prospect areas * To suggest exploratory well locations *Using GIS for better evaluation of prospect June 2006 – December 2006 (7 months) New Delhi Area, India

Mine Planning and Material handling systems Statutory documents- Mine Plan, Post Mine Closure Plan Pre-feasibility reports Detailed Project Reports (DPR) Open cast and Under ground designing including high wall mining Environmental Impact Assessment and Management Plan (EIA/ EMP) Cost Estimation Courses

Msc, Geophysics The University of Calgary 3D Seismic Attributes for Prospect Identification and Reservoir Characterization (CSEG Doodle Train 2010) Seismic Data Processing (CSEG Doodle Train 2009) Petrel Training from Sclumberger (2011) Junior Geophysicist Divestco Inc. Multicomponent Seismic Exploration in Western Canada (CSEG Doodle Train 2011) Honors and Awards

CSEG Scholarship CSEG September 2009 The University of Calgary CSEG scholarship, generously donated by Hampson - Russell. EAGE Travel Grant EAGE June 2011 The University of Calgary EAGE granted travel grant for presenting Paper in EAGE 2011 at Vienna. Also, granted grant to take part in Field challenge competition sponsored by Total oil. Placed 2nd for Fully Integrated EvaLuation and Development of Field European Association of Geo scientist and Engineer June 2011 The University of Calgary The EAGE student FIELD Challenge (Fully Integrated EvaLuation and Development) to promote cross-disciplinary geoscience and engineering integration within universities.

• Seismic interpretation • Well log analysis • Structural model • Identified flow units • Static reservoir model property modelling • Dynamic reservoir model • Forward (appraisal and) development plan Skills & Expertise

Geophysics Geotechnical Engineering Seismic Seismic Interpretation Data Processing GIS Matlab Publications

Artificial neural network and liquefaction susceptibility assessment: a case study using the 2001 Bhuj earthquake data, Gujarat, India Springerlink - Computational GeoscienceJune 25, 2008 Authors: Akshay Gulati This study pertains to prediction of liquefaction susceptibility of unconsolidated sediments using artificial neural network (ANN) as a prediction model. The backpropagation neural network was trained, tested, and validated with 23 datasets comprising parameters such as cyclic resistance ratio (CRR), cyclic stress ratio (CSR), liquefaction severity index (LSI), and liquefaction sensitivity index (...more Evaluating cut slope failure by numerical analysis—a case study Springerlink - Natural HazardsMarch 12, 2008 Authors: Akshay Gulati Slope failure is very common phenomenon in hilly regions, especially in young techno active mountainous like Himalayas. It is hazardous because of the accompanying progressive movement of the slope-forming material. In order to minimize the landslide effects, slope failure analysis and stabilization requires in depth understanding of the process that governs the behavior of the slope. The present...more Geoinformatics for Natural Resource Management : Nova publications USA : Application of Soft Computing for Landslide Prediction, Prevention and Mitigation pp. 349-382June 1, 2009 Authors: Akshay Gulati This is a book chapter written by me as a co author. Publishers are leading NOVA publishers, Newyork, USA. Chapter number 16: Use of soft computing for Landslide prediction. Natural and Man Made Disasters : Vulnerability, Preparedness and Mitigation 1st ed. New Delhi, M. D. Publications Pvt. Ltd.June 1, 2010 Authors: Akshay Gulati Book chapter written by me as a Co Author. Chapter focus on landslide, Geology and slope stability factor. Algorithm for the Restoration of Clipped GPR Amplitudes 73rd EAGE Conference & ExhibitionMay 23, 2011 Authors: Akshay Gulati, Robert.J.Ferguson It is common in Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imagery to have missing or corrupted traces. This can be either due to obstacles, noise, technical problems or economic considerations. Antenna-ground coupling is another reason for clipped amplitudes in GPR data. Most commercially available software use the famous "rubber band interpolation", which uses the spline polynomial to undo the clippings....more NFFT: Algorithm for Irregular Sampling CSEG :GEOCANADA 2010May 11, 2010 Authors: Akshay Gulati, Robert J. Ferguson Accurate Declipping Hybrid Algorithm for Ground Penetrating Radar Data. Recovery – 2011 CSPG CSEG CWLS ConventionMay 10, 2011 Authors: Akshay Gulati, R. J. Ferguson, Education

The University of Calgary Msc, Geophysics 2009 – 2011

Activities and Societies: President of European Association of Geo scientist and Engineer. Responsible for arranging technical talk twice a month from people working in industry. Arranging technical workshops so that students can interact with some real industry work. Working in Teams for activities like Geo quiz.

During my Engineering, My focus was on Geo-technical Engineering and Engineering Geology. Activities and Societies: President of Civil Engineering Student Association.

 

re your specific question: I see you want to know what age you can get in, but you probably already know that the range of students getting into HBS have about 3-4 years of work experience.

Unfortunately, from you post, I don't see enough that convinces me that you have a shot at at all, mostly because it's not clear to me how you have met the criteria of HBS

http://www.hbs.edu/mba/admissions/admissioncriteria.html

I wish I could be more helpful, but I do not really have a feel for what you would add to the class -- if you can try again, more succinctly, that would help me answer you.

Betsy Massar Come see me at my Q&A thread http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions Ask away!
 
Betsy Massar:
re your specific question: I see you want to know what age you can get in, but you probably already know that the range of students getting into HBS have about 3-4 years of work experience.

Unfortunately, from you post, I don't see enough that convinces me that you have a shot at at all, mostly because it's not clear to me how you have met the criteria of HBS

http://www.hbs.edu/mba/admissions/admissioncriteria.html

I wish I could be more helpful, but I do not really have a feel for what you would add to the class -- if you can try again, more succinctly, that would help me answer you.

Thanks for the reply. My questions are

  1. Is 32 too old for HBS ?
  2. I see what HBS look for, do you have any advice for me which can my my profile strong ?

Thanks for going through that big post.